Fighting For a More Generous World

Fighting For a More Generous World Fighting For a More Generous World

Researchers at the University of Notre Dame are taking a leadership role in providing individuals and organizations with the insights and tools to make the world a more generous place.

Exploring an essential human virtue. Whether it’s the gift of time, money, or a helping hand, everyone has the capacity to transform someone else’s life. But, in a world where millions struggle to put food on the table, millions more struggle either to keep their jobs or to find jobs that pay a living wage, and millions still struggle with either preventable or treatable diseases, why do some people give so much and others so little? The University of Notre Dame’s Science of Generosity initiative is leading an international effort to uncover the causes, manifestations, and consequences of generosity.

Established in 2009 by a $5 million grant from the John Templeton Foundation, the initiative takes a scientific approach to the study of generosity in all of its forms. Led by Christian Smith, Ph.D., professor of sociology and director of the University’s Center for the Study of Religion and Society, the initiative brings together a community of scholars from around the world—and from across various academic disciplines—to learn more about a subject of fundamental importance and, in the process, to fight for world-transforming change.

The University of Notre Dame asks you, “What would you fight for?” Learn more about the Science of Generosity.

What Would You Fight For?

The University of Notre Dame’s award-winning “What Would You Fight For?” series, now in its seventh season, showcases the work, scholarly achievements, and global impact of Notre Dame faculty, students, and alumni. These two-minute segments, each originally aired during a home football game broadcast on NBC, highlight the University’s proud moniker, the Fighting Irish, and tell the stories of the members of the Notre Dame family who fight to bring solutions to a world in need.

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