Tracy Kijewski-Correa
  Tracy
Bio Sketch

Tracy Kijewski-Correa is Linbeck Associate Professor of the Department of Civil Engineering and Geological Sciences at the University of Notre Dame and leads the Structural DYNamics And MOnitoring (DYNAMO) Laboratory. DYNAMO is dedicated to addressing 21st Century Civil Infrastructure Challenges posed by increased urbanization and hazard vulnerability, using inter-disciplinary collaborations and context-driven technologies ranging from advanced sensing, simulation and cyber-infrastructure to innovative sustainable systems suitable for developing countries. These efforts include an NSF-funded, full-scale monitoring program for signature buildings in three countries around the globe, including the world’s tallest building, Burj Khalifa. This work has been recognized by a number of awards, including the International Association of Wind Engineering’s Junior Researcher Award. Other activities include research in cyber-physical systems and embedded sensing, in collaboration with a multi-disciplinary, college-wide research team focused on wireless sensor networks for detection of damage in civil infrastructure and terrorist activities in major cities. In addition, Dr. Kijewski-Correa is a PI on two NSF-funded projects leveraging cyber-infrastructure to mitigate wind hazards on structures and to create new paradigms for open-sourcing the design of civil infrastructure. Recently, these efforts have been extended by Notre Dame’s SAPC Program to include the seeding of CYBER-EYE: A Cyber-Collaboratory for National Risk Modeling and Assessment to Mitigate the Impacts of Hurricanes in a Changing Climate.

Dr. Kijewski-Correa’s scholarship is now being extended to global development challenges. This began with her founding of an NSF-funded REU site to allow undergraduates to work on sustainable and culturally appropriate housing designs in the wake of the 2004 Boxing Day Tsunami, including conducting three years of field reconnaissance and recovery evaluation in Thailand and Indonesia. Her most prominent work now focuses on the master planning and rebuilding of Leogane, Haiti, the effective epicenter of the 2010 Earthquake. To this end, she and her collaborators have conducted numerous reconnaissance trips following the earthquake and are currently engaged in development of a sustainable model for low-income housing, funded by the National Collegiate Inventors Association, under the banner of Engineering2Empower (E2E). This project and another effort she advises, ND SEED: Notre Dame Students Empowering Engineering Development, allows students to engage in service-based research and scholarship to help deliver critical infrastructure to developing countries in Latin America and the Caribbean.

Research Group Website

tkijewsk@nd.edu

574.631.2980

Alexandros Taflanidis
  Alex
Bio Sketch
Alexandros Taflanidis is the Rooney Family Assistant Professor at the Department of Civil Engineering and Geological Sciences and Concurrent Assistant Professor of Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering at the University of Notre Dame. His work in the HIPAD Laboratory focuses on the implementation of advanced computational and simulation methodologies for assessment and mitigation of risk due to natural hazards (such as earthquakes, waves and hurricanes) and for the analysis and design of high-performance engineering systems in the presence of probabilistically characterized modeling uncertainties. The applications his group examines extend to seismic resistant design of structural systems, assessment of risk due to hurricanes in support of emergency responses, optimal monitoring and maintenance of bridge infrastructure systems, and optimization of grids of wave-energy extraction devices or offshore wind turbines. Dr. Taflanidis is also part of the University of Notre Dame team that is committed to scholarship and service for Haiti following the devastating January 2010 earthquake. Along with Professor Kijewski-Correa they have visited Haiti numerous times and have formed Engineering2Empower with the ultimate goal of providing hazard resilient, sustainable solutions for residential housing serving bottom of the pyramid families still living in IDP camps two years after the 2010 earthquake.

Research Group Website

a.taflanidis@nd.edu

574.631.5696

Ahsan Kareem
  Ahsan
Bio Sketch
Ahsan Kareem is the Robert M. Moran Professor of Civil Engineering and Geological Sciences and the director of the NatHaz Modeling Laboratory at the University of Notre Dame. His research uses computer models and laboratory and full-scale experiments to study the dynamic effects of environmental loads under winds, waves, and earthquakes in order to understand and predict the impact of natural hazards on the constructed environment and to develop mitigation strategies that enhance the performance and safety of structures. He is a former president of the American Association for Wind Engineering, and past editor-in-chief for the international journal Wind and Structures. Dr. Kareem is the recipient of the Alan G. Davenport Medal presented by the International Association for Wind Engineering in recognition of his distinguished achievement in the dynamic wind effects on structures, the Robert H. Scanlan Medal for outstanding contributions to the study of aeroelasticity/aerodynamics and wind-load effects on structural design, and the Jack E. Cermak Medal in recognition for his contributions to wind effects on structures from the American Society of Civil Engineers(ASCE). Dr. Kareem was elected to the National Academy of Engineering in 2009 for his contributions in analyses and designs to account for wind effects on tall buildings, long-span bridges, and other structures. In 2010, he was elected as a Foreign Fellow of the Indian National Academy of Engineering. In 2010, he was elected as a distinguished Member of ASCE for his knowledge, eminence in the field of wind engineering, structural engineering, engineering mechanics, for profound contributions to the ASCE Wind Loads Standards and for development of web-based technologies and design tools for practice. Dr. Kareem was appointed Honorary Professor of Tongji University, Shanghai, PROC, 2010, for his contributions to wind engineering, bridge engineering and structural engineering. In 2011, he was inducted to the Offshore Technology Conference Hall of Fame, ASCE/COPRI for his paper presented at early years of OTC that offered innovation, direction and lasting impact on the design, construction or installation of offshore infrastructure.

Research Group Website

kareem@nd.edu

574.631.6648