Faculty Directory--Matt Campbell

Matt Campbell


Matt Campbell
Naughton Fellow 2008-2009


Matt Campbell is Reader in English at the University of Sheffield. Educated at Trinity College Dublin and Christ’s College Cambridge he published Rhythm and Will in Victorian Poetry in 1999, a book about agency and poetic form in Tennyson, Browning, Hopkins and Hardy. He was also also editor of the Tennyson Research Bulletin  for five years, and his Victorian interests led him to William Allingham, the Irish poet whose Diary records the talk of many Victorian literary figures. An article on Allingham’s own poetry was to be one of the first of a number of pieces Campbell has published on nineteenth-century Irish poetry, and other poets he has written about include Thomas Moore, Samuel Ferguson and James Clarence Mangan. He subsequently wrote the chapter on poetry from 1829-1889 in the Cambridge History of Irish Literature, and a chapter on ‘Davis, Mangan, Ferguson’ is forthcoming in the first volume of the Blackwell Companion to Irish Literature. Irish and British poetry continues to be his main interest, particularly in the conflicts of the period of the United Kingdom from 1801: Irish Poetry in the Union, a forthcoming monograph about the poetry of nineteenth-century Ireland from Thomas Moore to James Joyce also features English poets writing about and in Ireland, including Tennyson, Arnold and, most notably, Hopkins. As part of his work on British poetry, in 2008 he gave the Warton Lecture on English Poetry to the British Academy, on ‘Wordsworth and the Druids’. He has published articles and chapters on Joyce and Yeats, and an interest in Irish music will be reflected in an essay on Moore in his forthcoming co-edited volume The Voice of the People: the European Folk Revival, 1765-1914.

Campbell also works on modern and contemporary poetry, and in 2003 he published an edited collection, The Cambridge Companion to Contemporary Irish Poetry. He has published articles and reviews on contemporary Irish poetry, most notably on Paul Muldoon and Seamus Heaney, but also on war poetry and metaphor in the modern Irish poem. Future interests are in Irish rhyme, and singing forms in Irish and English lyric poetry.