Fall Courses 2006 Cúrsaí an Fhómhair 2006

Irish Language Courses

Beginning Irish I-- IRST 10101:01
TR 9:30-10:45
Brian Ó Conchubhair
This course provides an enjoyable introduction to Modern Irish. Energetic teachers in small classes teach basic language skills, prepare students to conduct conversations and to read authentic texts. Extensive use is made of role-play and interactive teaching methods. Irish 10101 is a superb opportunity to learn a new language, explore Irish/Celtic culture and investigate the linguistic politics of the only minority language offered at Notre Dame. In addition to satisfying the language requirement of the College of Arts and Letters, and College of Science, Irish satisfies the popular Irish Studies Minor’s requirements and selected students will have an opportunity to study in Dublin, Ireland. No prior knowledge of the Irish Language required.
Beginning Irish--IRST 10101:02
MWF 10:40-11:30
Tara MacLeod
This course provides an enjoyable introduction to Modern Irish. Energetic teachers in small classes teach basic language skills, prepare students to conduct conversations and to read authentic texts. Extensive use is made of role-play and interactive teaching methods. Irish 10101 is a superb opportunity to learn a new language, explore Irish/Celtic culture and investigate the linguistic politics of the only minority language offered at Notre Dame. In addition to satisfying the language requirement of the College of Arts and Letters, and College of Science, Irish satisfies the popular Irish Studies Minor’s requirements and selected students will have an opportunity to study in Dublin, Ireland. No prior knowledge of the Irish Language required.
Beginning Irish I--IRST 10101:03
MWF 8:30-9:20
Laoise Ní Thuairisg
This course provides an enjoyable introduction to Modern Irish. Energetic teachers in small classes teach basic language skills, prepare students to conduct conversations and to read authentic texts. Extensive use is made of role-play and interactive teaching methods. Irish 10101 is a superb opportunity to learn a new language, explore Irish/Celtic culture and investigate the linguistic politics of the only minority language offered at Notre Dame. In addition to satisfying the language requirement of the College of Arts and Letters, and College of Science, Irish satisfies the popular Irish Studies Minor’s requirements and selected students will have an opportunity to study in Dublin, Ireland. No prior knowledge of the Irish Language required.
Beginning Irish I--IRST 10101:04
MWF 8:30-9:20
TBA
This course provides an enjoyable introduction to Modern Irish. Energetic teachers in small classes teach basic language skills, prepare students to conduct conversations and to read authentic texts. Extensive use is made of role-play and interactive teaching methods. Irish 10101 is a superb opportunity to learn a new language, explore Irish/Celtic culture and investigate the linguistic politics of the only minority language offered at Notre Dame. In addition to satisfying the language requirement of the College of Arts and Letters, Irish satisfies the popular Irish Studies Minor’s requirements and selected students will have an opportunity to study in Dublin, Ireland. No prior knowledge of the Irish Language required.
Beginning Irish II--IRST 10102:01
TR 1:55-2:45
Sarah McKibben
A second semester of instruction in the Irish Language. This course is a continuation of IRST 10101 and further develops the students’ linguistic ability and knowledge of Irish. Role-play, pair work and group work, written exercise and dialogue are used to expand the student’s vocabulary, and cultivate a deeper understanding of the language. Students read basic texts and view a select number of authentic materials including some videos. Students are required to have passed Irish 101. In addition to satisfying the language requirement of the College of Arts and Letters, Irish satisfies the popular Irish Studies Minor’s requirements and selected students will have an opportunity to study in Dublin, Ireland.
Beginning Irish II--IRST 10102:02
MWF 4:05-4:55
Tara MacLeod
A second semester of instruction in the Irish Language. This course is a continuation of IRST 10101 and further develops the students’ linguistic ability and knowledge of Irish. Role-play, pair work and group work, written exercise and dialogue are used to expand the student’s vocabulary, and cultivate a deeper understanding of the language. Students read basic texts and view a select number of authentic materials including some videos. Students are required to have passed Irish 10101. In addition to satisfying the language requirement of the College of Arts and Letters, and College of Science, Irish satisfies the popular Irish Studies Minor’s requirements and selected students will have an opportunity to study in Dublin, Ireland.
Intermediate Irish--IRST 20103:01
TR 9:30-10:45
Hugh Fogarty
This course follows on IRLL 10101 and 10102 with attention to more advanced grammatical structures, speaking and reading. You will hone your linguistic skills and also delve into some short twentieth-century texts in Irish. In addition, you will learn something about Irish culture and music. Prerequisites: you must have passed 10101 and 10102 to enroll.
Graduate Course Beginning Irish I--IRLL 60101:01
TR 9:30-10:45
Brian Ó Conchubhair
This course provides an enjoyable introduction to Modern Irish. Energetic teachers in small classes teach basic language skills, prepare students to conduct conversations and to read authentic texts. Extensive use is made of role-play and interactive teaching methods. Irish 60101 is a superb opportunity to learn a new language, explore Irish/Celtic culture and investigate the linguistic politics of the only minority language offered at Notre Dame. In addition to satisfying the language requirement of the College of Arts and Letters, and College of Science, Irish satisfies the popular Irish Studies Minor’s requirements and selected students will have an opportunity to study in Dublin, Ireland. No prior knowledge of the Irish Language required.
Graduate Course Beginning Irish I--IRLL 60101:02
MWF 10:40-11:30
Tara MacLeod
This course provides an enjoyable introduction to Modern Irish. Energetic teachers in small classes teach basic language skills, prepare students to conduct conversations and to read authentic texts. Extensive use is made of role-play and interactive teaching methods. Irish 60101 is a superb opportunity to learn a new language, explore Irish/Celtic culture and investigate the linguistic politics of the only minority language offered at Notre Dame. In addition to satisfying the language requirement of the College of Arts and Letters, and College of Science, Irish satisfies the popular Irish Studies Minor’s requirements and selected students will have an opportunity to study in Dublin, Ireland. No prior knowledge of the Irish Language required.
Graduate Course Beginning Irish I--IRLL 60101:04
MWF 8:30-9:20
TBA
This course provides an enjoyable introduction to Modern Irish. Energetic teachers in small classes teach basic language skills, prepare students to conduct conversations and to read authentic texts. Extensive use is made of role-play and interactive teaching methods. Irish 60101 is a superb opportunity to learn a new language, explore Irish/Celtic culture and investigate the linguistic politics of the only minority language offered at Notre Dame. In addition to satisfying the language requirement of the College of Arts and Letters, and College of Science, Irish satisfies the popular Irish Studies Minor’s requirements and selected students will have an opportunity to study in Dublin, Ireland. No prior knowledge of the Irish Language required.
Graduate Course Beginning Irish II--IRLL 60102:01
MWF 1:55-2:45
Tara MacLeod
A second semester of instruction in the Irish Language. This course is a continuation of IRST 60101 and further develops the students’ linguistic ability and knowledge of Irish. Role-play, pair work and group work, written exercise and dialogue to expand the student’s vocabulary, and cultivate a deeper understanding of the language. Students read basic texts and view a select number of authentic materials including some videos. Students are required to have passed Irish 60101.
Graduate Course Beginning Irish II--IRLL 60102:02
MWF 4:05-4:55
Tara MacLeod
A second semester of instruction in the Irish Language. This course is a continuation of IRST 60101 and further develops the students’ linguistic ability and knowledge of Irish. Role-play, pair work and group work, written exercise and dialogue to expand the student’s vocabulary, and cultivate a deeper understanding of the language. Students read basic texts and view a select number of authentic materials including some videos. Students are required to have passed Irish 60101.
Intermediate Irish--IRST 60103:01
TR 9:30-10:45
Hugh Fogarty
This course follows on IRLL 10101 and 10102 with attention to more advanced grammatical structures, speaking and reading. You will hone your linguistic skills and also delve into some short twentieth-century texts in Irish. In addition, you will learn something about Irish culture and music. Prerequisites: you must have passed 10101 and 10102 to enroll.
Intermediate Irish--IRST 60103:02
TR 11:00-12:15
Hugh Fogarty
This course follows on IRLL 10101 and 10102 with attention to more advanced grammatical structures, speaking and reading. You will hone your linguistic skills and also delve into some short twentieth-century texts in Irish. In addition, you will learn something about Irish culture and music. Prerequisites: you must have passed 10101 and 10102 to enroll.
Intermediate Irish--IRST 20103:02
TR 11:00-12:15 Hugh Fogarty
This course follows on IRLL 10101 and 10102 with attention to more advanced grammatical structures, speaking and reading. You will hone your linguistic skills and also delve into some short twentieth-century texts in Irish. In addition, you will learn something about Irish culture and music. Prerequisites: you must have passed 10101 and 10102 to enroll.
Graduate Course Beginning Irish I--IRLL 60101:01 TR 9:30-10:45
Brian Ó Conchubhair
This course provides an enjoyable introduction to Modern Irish. Energetic teachers in small classes teach basic language skills, prepare students to conduct conversations and to read authentic texts. Extensive use is made of role-play and interactive teaching methods. Irish 60101 is a superb opportunity to learn a new language, explore Irish/Celtic culture and investigate the linguistic politics of the only minority language offered at Notre Dame. In addition to satisfying the language requirement of the College of Arts and Letters, and College of Science, Irish satisfies the popular Irish Studies Minor’s requirements and selected students will have an opportunity to study in Dublin, Ireland. No prior knowledge of the Irish Language required.
Graduate Course Beginning Irish I--IRLL 60101:02
MWF 10:40-11:30
Tara MacLeod
This course provides an enjoyable introduction to Modern Irish. Energetic teachers in small classes teach basic language skills, prepare students to conduct conversations and to read authentic texts. Extensive use is made of role-play and interactive teaching methods. Irish 60101 is a superb opportunity to learn a new language, explore Irish/Celtic culture and investigate the linguistic politics of the only minority language offered at Notre Dame. In addition to satisfying the language requirement of the College of Arts and Letters, and College of Science, Irish satisfies the popular Irish Studies Minor’s requirements and selected students will have an opportunity to study in Dublin, Ireland. No prior knowledge of the Irish Language required.
Graduate Course Beginning Irish I--IRLL 60101:04
MWF 8:30-9:20
TBA
This course provides an enjoyable introduction to Modern Irish. Energetic teachers in small classes teach basic language skills, prepare students to conduct conversations and to read authentic texts. Extensive use is made of role-play and interactive teaching methods. Irish 60101 is a superb opportunity to learn a new language, explore Irish/Celtic culture and investigate the linguistic politics of the only minority language offered at Notre Dame. In addition to satisfying the language requirement of the College of Arts and Letters, and College of Science, Irish satisfies the popular Irish Studies Minor’s requirements and selected students will have an opportunity to study in Dublin, Ireland. No prior knowledge of the Irish Language required.
Graduate Course Beginning Irish II--IRLL 60102:01
MWF 1:55-2:45
Tara MacLeod
A second semester of instruction in the Irish Language. This course is a continuation of IRST 60101 and further develops the students’ linguistic ability and knowledge of Irish. Role-play, pair work and group work, written exercise and dialogue to expand the student’s vocabulary, and cultivate a deeper understanding of the language. Students read basic texts and view a select number of authentic materials including some videos. Students are required to have passed Irish 60101.
Graduate Course Beginning Irish II--IRLL 60102:02
MWF 4:05-4:55
Tara MacLeod
A second semester of instruction in the Irish Language. This course is a continuation of IRST 60101 and further develops the students’ linguistic ability and knowledge of Irish. Role-play, pair work and group work, written exercise and dialogue to expand the student’s vocabulary, and cultivate a deeper understanding of the language. Students read basic texts and view a select number of authentic materials including some videos. Students are required to have passed Irish 60101.
Intermediate Irish--IRST 60103:01
TR 9:30-10:45
Hugh Fogarty
This course follows on IRLL 10101 and 10102 with attention to more advanced grammatical structures, speaking and reading. You will hone your linguistic skills and also delve into some short twentieth-century texts in Irish. In addition, you will learn something about Irish culture and music. Prerequisites: you must have passed 10101 and 10102 to enroll.
Intermediate Irish--IRST 60103:02
TR 11:00-12:15
Hugh Fogarty
This course follows on IRLL 10101 and 10102 with attention to more advanced grammatical structures, speaking and reading. You will hone your linguistic skills and also delve into some short twentieth-century texts in Irish. In addition, you will learn something about Irish culture and music. Prerequisites: you must have passed 10101 and 10102 to enroll.

Irish Literature Courses

Celtic Heroic Literature--IRST 20109:01
TR 5:00-6:15
Hugh Fogarty
An exciting introduction to Celtic literature and culture, this course introduces the thrilling sagas, breathtaking legends and prose tales of Ireland and Wales. Readings include battles, heroic deeds, feats of strength and daring and dilemma faced by the warrior heroes of the Celts. Celtic Heroic Literature, which requires no previous knowledge of Irish or Welsh, studies the ideology, belief system and concerns of the ancient Celtic peoples as reveled in their saga literature. By examining the hero’s function in society, students investigate the ideological concerns of a society undergoing profound social transformation and religious conversion to Christianity and the hero’s role as a conduit for emotional and social distress. Among the heroes to be studied in depth are: Cú Chulainn, Lug, St. Patrick and the king-heroes. Wisdom literature, archaeological and historical evidence will also be considered in this course. No prior knowledge of Irish required. All texts provided in English. Fulfills University Literature Requirement.
Advanced Readings in Irish Culture--IRST 20203:01
TR 12:30-1:45
Brian Ó Conchubhair
Reading on culture, literature, sport, current affairs and politics form the basis of this course. Each week we read and contextualize a prearranged text. Students are encouraged to suggest readings/texts which relate to their studies or research topics and every reasonable effort is made to incorporate such material into the syllabus. Examples of texts studied in this class include: interviews with contemporary Irish writers: Nuala Ní Dhomhnaill and Alan Titley; essays by political figures (Sinn Féin/SDLP), journalism/opinion pieces from the Irish Times, Foinse, Feasta, Beo; literature criticism by Breandán Ó Buachalla and Diarmuid Ó Giolláin. This course suits students returning from a semester/year in Dublin, eager to keep in touch with current affairs and anxious to stay in touch with the political and cultural landscape in Ireland. A solid command of the language is required for this course. All texts are in Irish. This course is required for the Minor in Irish Language and Literature.
Irish Prison Literature--IRST 20538:01
TR 11:00-12:15
Sean T. O’Brien
Along with the church, the university and the army, the prison is one of the central institutions in Ireland, and literature has traditionally been the way prisoners protest, resist, and critique their harrowing experiences. In this course we will examine work written by men and women during and after their incarceration, including major literary figures (Brendan Behan and Oscar Wilde), key figures in Irish history (Jeremiah O'Donovan Rossa and Tom Clarke), and revolutionary women (Maude Gonne and Kathleen Clarke). Course requirements include response papers, presentations and a research paper.
The Hidden Ireland: Themes and Issues in Eighteenth-Century Irish Poetry--IRST 30107:01
TR 2:00-3:15
Breandán Ó Buachalla
Daniel Corkery’s study of the literature and society of Irish-speaking Munster in the eighteenth-century (The Hidden Ireland, first published in 1924) is an acknowledged classic of Irish literary history. This course will examine aspects of the corpus of eighteenth-century poetry in the Irish language in the light of Corkery’s analysis and of subsequent reassessments of that analysis (Louis Cullen and Breandán Ó Buachalla, for example). Selections from the corpus of poetry will be taken from Ó Tuama and Kinsella An Duanaire: poems of the dispossessed (1981).
The Irish in Their Own Words: Introduction to Irish Literature--IRST 40306:01
TR 12:30-1:45
Peter McQuillan
The purpose of this course is to introduce students to the richness and variety of literature produced in the Irish language during the medieval and early modern periods (we will cover primarily the period between approximately 800 and 1700 A.D).The emphasis in the first half of the semester will be on studying the mainly prose saga literature of the medieval period in its various literary, cultural and historical contexts. This will involve both a close reading of the texts themselves in English translation and an examination of the material in the light of recent scholarship in this area. The second half will investigate the literature of the early modern period, in this case largely the poetry. This period is one of cumulative crisis for the Irish and their linguistic and cultural well-being. Students read closely a selection of texts representative of various facets of this crisis and of Irish responses to them in their own language rather than in the English language of their colonisers. All the translations are accompanied by facing original text so that students gain some working knowledge of the Irish language which will assist them in evaluating the translations which they are reading and in appreciating the sensuous beauty of much of this poetry. The material provides interesting contrasts and comparisons for those who have already studied some Anglo-Irish literature and it should also be of interest to students of modern Irish history. No prior knowledge of Irish presumed. Fulfills University Literature Requirement.
Modern Irish Poetry--IRST 40308:01
TR 3:30-4:45W 3:00-4:15
Nuala Ní Dhomhnaill
An introduction to Ireland and the Irish poetic tradition, this course is a magnificent chance to study modern Irish poetry with the greatest living Irish-language poet. Visiting Notre Dame for the 2006 Fall semester only, Nuala Ní Dhomhnaill will teach a course on modern and contemporary Irish poetry. This class will spotlight key canonical texts by Irish-language poets as students conduct close textual readings, examine the verses’ social and political context and deconstruct the mechanics of each individual poem. We will read: Cathal Ó Searcaigh, Gearóid Mac Lochlainn, Biddy Jenkinson, Michael Hartnett, Máire Mhac an tSaoi, Michael Davitt, Gabriel Rosenstock, Liam Ó Muirlithe, Pearse Hutchinson, Seán Ó Ríordáin, Máirtín Ó Direáin and Áine Ní Ghlinn. This course also focuses on Nuala Ní Dhomhnaill’s own work. All texts will be available in English. No prior knowledge of Irish required. Fulfills University Literature Requirement.
Ideology, Poetry and Politics in Jacobite Ireland--IRST 40310:01
W 6:00-9:00
Breandán Ó Buachalla
Jacobitism, or allegiance to the course of the House of Stuart (from Latin Jacobus “James”the deposed James II), was the common voice of political dissent in 18th century Ireland, Scotland and England. Irish Catholic advocacy of the Stuart cause had already become a political orthodoxy in the course of the 17th century and when the Stuarts were deposed by William of Orange (“King Billy”) later succeeded by the Hanoverians (1714) the culture of dispossession and displacement and the rhetoric of return and restoration became firmly entrenched in the political ideology of Catholic Ireland. This course will examine the development of Irish Jacobitism in its various literary, historical and ideological aspects in addition to placing it within its wider British and European context in the 18th century.
Visits to Bedlam--IRST 40311:01
TR 9:30-10:45
Christopher Fox
Until visitation was restricted in 1770, London’s Bethlem Hospital (popularly known as “Bedlam”) attracted as many as 96,000 spectators per year who paid for the privilege of watching mental patients: like the tigers in The Tower, these patients were not simply chained, but shown, put on exhibition. The cruelty of this practice and the fact that it was stopped both point to the eighteenth-century fascination with madness, with the irrational, with what Freud would call the “unheimlich,” the “uncanny.” Johnson’s astronomer who comes to believe that he personally controls the weather, Sterne’s mad Maria, piping for her lost lover, Locke’s man who believes himself made out of glass and who acts, “reasonably,” to avoid hard objects; or Swift’s modest proposer who concocts a cookbook to save the Irish nation--all bear witness to this other side of the eighteenth century, which will be the subject of this course. We will begin with selections from Cervantes’ Don Quixote and some short readings in Locke and others who attempted to analyze madness. We will then move on to explorations of Johnson, Smollett, Sterne, and Swift. Our major focus will be the last writer, with special attention to his poetry. Gulliver’s Travels, and A Tale of A Tub. (Swift, who was a Govenor of Bethlem Hospital, left most of his money to fund the first mental hospital in Ireland, St. Patrick’s, which is still there). For the sake of comparison, we will conclude with several nineteenth-century selections.
Modern Irish Poetry--IRST 60308:01
TR 3:30-4:45W 3:00-4:15
Nuala Ní Dhomhnaill
An introduction to Ireland and the Irish poetic tradition, this course is a magnificent chance to study modern Irish poetry with the greatest living Irish-language poet. Visiting Notre Dame for the 2006 Fall semester only, Nuala Ní Dhomhnaill will teach a course on modern and contemporary Irish poetry. This class will spotlight key canonical texts by Irish-language poets as students conduct close textual readings, examine the verses’ social and political context and deconstruct the mechanics of each individual poem. We will read: Cathal Ó Searcaigh, Gearóid Mac Lochlainn, Biddy Jenkinson, Michael Hartnett, Máire Mhac an tSaoi, Michael Davitt, Gabriel Rosenstock, Liam Ó Muirlithe, Pearse Hutchinson, Seán Ó Ríordáin, Máirtín Ó Direáin and Áine Ní Ghlinn. This course also focuses on Nuala Ní Dhomhnaill’s own work. All texts will be available in English. No prior knowledge of Irish required. Fulfills University Literature Requirement.
Early Versions of Modernity, 1790-1820--IRST 90535:01
TR 6:30-9:00
{Course meets 8/23-10/13/06}
Seamus Deane
Graduate Course
The aim of the course is to discover the basic structure of the early analyses of modernity in the following writers: Edmund Burke, Walter Scott, Maria Edgeworth, Benjamin Constant, Mary Shelley and William Wordsworth. The central themes will be (a) the nature of the difference between revolutionary modernity and the preceding socio-political world; (b) the interconnnection between versions of political and psychic dislocation. The main texts will be Burke's Reflections on the Revolution in France, and his 1792 'Letter to Sir Hercules Langrishe' ; Scott's Heart of Midlothian and Old Mortality; Edgeworth's Castle Rackrent; Mary Shelley's Frankenstein; Constant's Adolphe and his 'The Liberty of the Ancients Compared with that of the Moderns', selected poems and passages from Wordsworth, including 'Tintern Abbey', 'Resolution and Independence', passages from The Prelude.
Advanced Readings in Irish Culture--IRST 60203:01
TR 12:30-1:45
Brian Ó Conchubhair
Reading on culture, literature, sport, current affairs and politics form the basis of this course. Each week we read and contextualize a prearranged text. Students are encouraged to suggest readings/texts which relate to their studies or research topics and every reasonable effort is made to incorporate such material into the syllabus. Examples of texts studied in this class include: interviews with contemporary Irish writers: Nuala Ní Dhomhnaill and Alan Titley; essays by political figures (Sinn Féin/SDLP), journalism/opinion pieces from the Irish Times, Foinse, Feasta, Beo; literature criticism by Breandán Ó Buachalla and Diarmuid Ó Giolláin. This course suits students returning from a semester/year in Dublin, eager to keep in touch with current affairs and anxious to stay in touch with the political and cultural landscape in Ireland. A solid command of the language is required for this course. All texts are in Irish. This course is required for the Minor in Irish Language and Literature.
Ideology, Poetry and Politics in Jacobite Ireland--IRST 60310:01
W 6:00-9:00
Breandán Ó Buachalla
Jacobitism, or allegiance to the course of the House of Stuart (from Latin Jacobus “James”the deposed James II), was the common voice of political dissent in 18th century Ireland, Scotland and England. Irish Catholic advocacy of the Stuart cause had already become a political orthodoxy in the course of the 17th century and when the Stuarts were deposed by William of Orange (“King Billy”) later succeeded by the Hanoverians (1714) the culture of dispossession and displacement and the rhetoric of return and restoration became firmly entrenched in the political ideology of Catholic Ireland. This course will examine the development of Irish Jacobitism in its various literary, historical and ideological aspects in addition to placing it within its wider British and European context in the 18th century.
Advanced Readings in Irish Culture--IRST 60203:01
TR 12:30-1:45
Brian Ó Conchubhair
Reading on culture, literature, sport, current affairs and politics form the basis of this course. Each week we read and contextualize a prearranged text. Students are encouraged to suggest readings/texts which relate to their studies or research topics and every reasonable effort is made to incorporate such material into the syllabus. Examples of texts studied in this class include: interviews with contemporary Irish writers: Nuala Ní Dhomhnaill and Alan Titley; essays by political figures (Sinn Féin/SDLP), journalism/opinion pieces from the Irish Times, Foinse, Feasta, Beo; literature criticism by Breandán Ó Buachalla and Diarmuid Ó Giolláin. This course suits students returning from a semester/year in Dublin, eager to keep in touch with current affairs and anxious to stay in touch with the political and cultural landscape in Ireland. A solid command of the language is required for this course. All texts are in Irish. This course is required for the Minor in Irish Language and Literature.
Ideology, Poetry and Politics in Jacobite Ireland--IRST 60310:01
W 6:00-9:00
Breandán Ó Buachalla
Jacobitism, or allegiance to the course of the House of Stuart (from Latin Jacobus “James”the deposed James II), was the common voice of political dissent in 18th century Ireland, Scotland and England. Irish Catholic advocacy of the Stuart cause had already become a political orthodoxy in the course of the 17th century and when the Stuarts were deposed by William of Orange (“King Billy”) later succeeded by the Hanoverians (1714) the culture of dispossession and displacement and the rhetoric of return and restoration became firmly entrenched in the political ideology of Catholic Ireland. This course will examine the development of Irish Jacobitism in its various literary, historical and ideological aspects in addition to placing it within its wider British and European context in the 18th century.