Fall Courses 2008 Cúrsaí an Fhómhair 2008

Beginning Irish I
IRST/IRLL 10101:01
Visiting Professor
MWF 8:30-9:20, T 9:30-10:20
This course provides an enjoyable introduction to Modern Irish. Energetic teachers in small classes teach basic language skills, prepare students to conduct conversations and to read authentic texts. Extensive use is made of role-play and interactive teaching methods. Irish 10101 is a superb opportunity to learn a new language, explore Irish/Celtic culture and investigate the linguistic politics of the only minority language offered at Notre Dame. In addition to satisfying the College language requirement, Irish satisfies the popular Irish Studies Minor’s requirements and selected students will have an opportunity to study in Dublin, Ireland. No prior knowledge of the Irish Language required.
Beginning Irish I
IRST/IRLL 10101:02
Tara MacLeod
MWF 10:40-11:30, T 11:00-11:50
This course provides an enjoyable introduction to Modern Irish. Energetic teachers in small classes teach basic language skills, prepare students to conduct conversations and to read authentic texts. Extensive use is made of role-play and interactive teaching methods. Irish 10101 is a superb opportunity to learn a new language, explore Irish/Celtic culture and investigate the linguistic politics of the only minority language offered at Notre Dame. In addition to satisfying the language requirement of the College of Arts and Letters, Irish satisfies the popular Irish Studies Minor’s requirements and selected students will have an opportunity to study in Dublin, Ireland. No prior knowledge of the Irish Language required.
Beginning Irish I
IRST/IRLL 10101:03
Visiting Professor
MWF 9:35-10:25, R 9:30-10:20
This course provides an enjoyable introduction to Modern Irish. Energetic teachers in small classes teach basic language skills, prepare students to conduct conversations and to read authentic texts. Extensive use is made of role-play and interactive teaching methods. Irish 10101 is a superb opportunity to learn a new language, explore Irish/Celtic culture and investigate the linguistic politics of the only minority language offered at Notre Dame. In addition to satisfying the language requirement of the College of Arts and Letters, Irish satisfies the popular Irish Studies Minor’s requirements and selected students will have an opportunity to study in Dublin, Ireland. No prior knowledge of the Irish Language required.
Beginning Irish I
IRLL 10101:04
Muireann Ní Bheaglaoich
MWF 12:50-1:40, R 11:00-11:50
This course provides an enjoyable introduction to Modern Irish. Energetic teachers in small classes teach basic language skills, prepare students to conduct conversations and to read authentic texts. Extensive use is made of role-play and interactive teaching methods. Irish 10101 is a superb opportunity to learn a new language, explore Irish/Celtic culture and investigate the linguistic politics of the only minority language offered at Notre Dame. In addition to satisfying the language requirement of the College of Arts and Letters, Irish satisfies the popular Irish Studies Minor’s requirements and selected students will have an opportunity to study in Dublin, Ireland. No prior knowledge of the Irish Language required.
Beginning Irish II
IRST/IRLL 10102:01
Ciara Conneely
MWF 10:40-11:30, R 9:30-10:20
A second semester of instruction in the Irish Language. This course is a continuation of IRST 10101 and further develops the students’ linguistic ability and knowledge of Irish. Role-play, pair work and group work, written exercise and dialogue are used to expand the student’s vocabulary, and cultivate a deeper understanding of the language. Students read basic texts and view a select number of authentic materials including some videos. Students are required to have passed Irish 101. In addition to satisfying the language requirement of the College of Arts and Letters, Irish satisfies the popular Irish Studies Minor’s requirements and selected students will have an opportunity to study in Dublin, Ireland.
Beginning Irish II
IRST/IRLL 10102:02
Tara MacLeod
MWF 10:45-12:35, T 9:30-10:20
A second semester of instruction in the Irish Language. This course is a continuation of IRST 10101 and further develops the students’ linguistic ability and knowledge of Irish. Role-play, pair work and group work, written exercise and dialogue are used to expand the student’s vocabulary, and cultivate a deeper understanding of the language. Students read basic texts and view a select number of authentic materials including some videos. Students are required to have passed Irish 101. In addition to satisfying the language requirement of the College of Arts and Letters, Irish satisfies the popular Irish Studies Minor’s requirements and selected students will have an opportunity to study in Dublin, Ireland.
Intermediate Irish
IRST/IRLL 20103:01
Brian Ó Conchubhair
MWF 9:35-10:25
This course follows on IRLL 10101 and 10102 with attention to more advanced grammatical structures, speaking and reading. You will hone your linguistic skills and also delve into some short twentieth-century texts in Irish. In addition, you will learn about Irish culture, music and participate in performances involving Irish. Prerequisites: you must have passed 10101 and 10102 to enroll.
Intermediate Irish
IRST/IRLL 20103:02
Sarah McKibben
MWF 10:40-11:30
This course follows on IRLL 10101 and 10102 with attention to more advanced grammatical structures, speaking and reading. You will hone your linguistic skills and also delve into some short twentieth-century texts in Irish. In addition, you will learn about Irish culture, music and participate in performances involving Irish. Prerequisites: you must have passed 10101 and 10102 to enroll.
Advanced Readings in Irish Culture
IRST/IRLL 20203:01
Brian Ó Conchubhair
MWF 10:40-11:30
An advanced course focusing on reading and translating a variety of texts in the Irish language. We concentrate on further development of reading, interpretive, and technical skills mastered in previous language courses (IRLL 10101, IRLL 10102, IRLL 20101). Texts from various authors and historical periods allow students to taste different writing styles: contemporary fiction, journalism, literary criticism, historical and cultural texts. Emphasis will be on sentence structure, stylistics and syntax. Students are required to have earned a high grade in IRLL 20101 in order to take this class. At the conclusion of this course, students will be able to conduct independent research with Irish texts.
Irish and American Tap Dance
IRST 21601:01
Professor James McKenna
MW 4:30-5:45
This course will teach a range of fundamental steps.
The Hidden Ireland
IRST 30107:01
Peter McQuillan
TR 12:30-1:45
The Hidden Ireland denotes both a book and a concept. The book was written by Daniel Corkery in 1924 and was an immediate success as it encapsulated a version of Irish history which had not hitherto been available to the general public; it is still considered to be a classic of its kind. The concept promoted the notion that history should emanate from “below” and should not be confined to the elites and governing classes. Both book and concept have had a profound impact on our understanding of Irish identity, Irish history, and Irish literature. This course will examine the book in depth and utilize it to open a window on the hidden Ireland of the 18th century. The cultural, historical, and literary issues which are raised by the book will be studied in the context of the poetry of the period. Poetry will be read in translation.
20th Century Irish Literature
IRST 30108:01
Sarah McKibben
MW 11:45-1:00
This course will introduce you to the vibrant contemporary literature in Irish (Gaelic) from the Gaelic Revival, which sought to rescue the language from extinction, right up to the present. This course will focus on developing your ability to read, analyze and write about literature with care and precision. You will do a LOT of writing, both graded and ungraded, to become a stronger reader and writer. In the process, we will consider the particular excitement and difficulty of writing in (and about!) a minority language that also happens to be the first official language of Ireland, as well as debates about identity, belonging, symbolization, history, anglicization, assimilation and hybridity, the new prominence of women writers, and ongoing challenges to stereotypes about Irish as tradition-bound (rather than, say, tradition-enabled), puritanical or premodern.
Writing Nations: Defining Englishness and Irishness in Victorian Era Literature
IRST 30226:01
Heather Edwards
TR 9:30-10:45
This course seeks to counter the view of English and Irish Literature as unrelated during the Victorian period by exploring how both Irish and English writers of the period engage in the process of defining their respective countries and cultures. Certainly, in the Victorian Era defining Ireland’s relationship to England was anything but simple. What becomes apparent by exploring Irish and English attempts to write about their respective ‘nations’ is not only the divergence in ways Irish and English writers characterized the relationship between the two countries but also how the process of defining Irish and English realities ultimately took different forms. Therefore, this course will not only explore how individual writers go about writing ‘nations’ but how the forms these writings take also reveal certain intersections and divergences between what characterizes Irishness and Englishness.
The Irish Tradition
IRST 30307:01
Hugh Fogarty
TR 3:30-4:45
Ireland possesses the oldest vernacular literary tradition in Europe, spanning over 1500 years to the present day. This course will provide a survey of the origins and development of that literary tradition through more than a millennium from its beginnings until the seventeenth century, when political circumstances led to the collapse of the highly-developed native system of learning, poetry and patronage. The development of the Irish literary tradition will be traced against this background of political and cultural upheavals from approximately 500 to 1650.
Early Medieval Ireland
IRST 30325:01
Rory Rapple
TR 3:30-4:45
Consideration of the period between 950 and 1400 is of crucial importance in understanding Irish history. This course not only covers the range of continuities and radical discontinuities that marked Ireland’s development during this time, but charts the attempted conquest of the entire country by the English Crown. The lecture series also seeks to answer a number of questions. Why did the Papacy give the English Crown sovereignty over Ireland? Why did a country like Ireland, on the verge of attaining political and economic centralization, not organize better resistance to English attempts to subdue it? Why did the English colony fail to prove more successful in exerting its will over indigenous Irish potentates? Culturally the period also witnessed the growing assimilation of English invaders to the norms of Gaelic Irish politics and society. Lastly, events in Ireland had a serious influence on developments in England, Wales and Scotland, provoking, amongst other things, the fall of the Plantagenet dynasty and an attempted invasion by King Robert I of Scotland.
Introduction to Irish Writers
IRST 30371:01
Sean O’Brien
MWF 10:40-11:30
As the visit to campus of the most recent Irish winner of the Nobel Prize in Literature suggests, this small island has produced a disproportionate number of great writers. Designed as a general literature course, the class will introduce the student to a broad range of Irish writers in English from the eighteenth century to the present. Writers will include Jonathan Swift, Maria Edgeworth, Oscar Wilde, James Joyce, William Butler Yeats, Elizabeth Bowen, Brian Friel, and John McGahern. We will also look at recent film versions of several of these writers’ works, including Wilde’s Importance of Being Earnest. Themes to be explored include representations of “national character” and the relationships between religion and national identity, gender and nationalism, Ireland and England, and “Irishness” and “Englishness.” Students can expect a midterm, a paper (5-6 pages typed) and a final.
Introduction to Irish Writers
IRST 30371:02
Melissa Dinsman
MWF 10:40-11:30
As the visit to campus of the most recent Irish winner of the Nobel Prize in Literature suggests, this small island has produced a disproportionate number of great writers. Designed as a general literature course, the class will introduce the student to a broad range of Irish writers in English from the eighteenth century to the present. Writers will include Jonathan Swift, Maria Edgeworth, Oscar Wilde, James Joyce, William Butler Yeats, Elizabeth Bowen, Brian Friel, and John McGahern. We will also look at recent film versions of several of these writers’ works, including Wilde’s Importance of Being Earnest. Themes to be explored include representations of “national character” and the relationships between religion and national identity, gender and nationalism, Ireland and England, and “Irishness” and “Englishness.” Students can expect a midterm, a paper (5-6 pages typed) and a final.
Tudor England: Politics and Honor
IRST 30410:01
Rory Rapple
TR 12:30-1:45
The period from 1485 to 1603, often feted as something of a ‘Golden Age’ for England, saw that country undergo serious changes that challenged the traditional ways in which the nation conceived of itself. These included the break from Rome, the loss of England’s foothold in France, and the unprecedented experience of monarchical rule by women. Each of these challenges demanded creative political responses and apologetic strategies harnessing intellectual resources from classical, Biblical, legal, chivalric and ecclesiastical sources. This course will examine these developments. It will also look at how the English, emerging from under the shadow of the internecine dynastic warfare of the fifteenth century, sought to preserve political stability and ensure a balance between continuity and change, and, furthermore, how individuals could use these unique circumstances to their own advantage.
Irish History Since 1800
IRST 30436:01
James Smyth
MWF 9:35-10:25
This course will consist of lectures and readings examining Irish political history and Anglo-Irish relations from 1801 up to and including the current conflict in Northern Ireland. Attention will be given to religious conflict, the development of romantic and revolutionary nationalism, the changing nature of Anglo-Irish relations, and the special problems of the North. A mid-semester examination, a paper/essay, and a final will be required.
Poetry and Politics in Ireland IRST 40304:01 Breandan Ó Buachalla TR 2:00-3:15 The political poetry of the period 1541-1688 will be discussed and analyzed against the historical background. The primary focus will be the mentality of the native intelligentsia as it is reflected in the poetry and as it responded to the momentous changes of the period. The origins and rise of the cult of the Stuarts will be examined and the historiography of the period will be assessed.
Culture and Politics
TR 3:30-4:45
Mary Smyth
IRST 40513:01
Using a broad range of texts--drama, fiction, poetry, film, painting, and documentary material--an examination of the politics of culture, and the cultures of politics, in the North of Ireland during the 20th century.
Scottish Gaelic (Graduate Course)
IRST 60213:01
Peter McQuillan
TR 2:00-3:15
The aim of this course is to provide an intensive introduction to the reading of texts in Scottish Gaelic. We will cover a wide spectrum of texts ranging from short stories, poetry, as well as journalistic and academic writing. No previous knowledge of Scottish Gaelic is required, but students should have studied at least three semesters of Modern Irish to prepare them for this course.
Clasaicí na Gaeilge (Graduate Course)
IRST 60309:01
Breandan Ó Buachalla
W 6:00-9:00 PM
Déanfar staidéar sa chúrsa seo ar na príomhshaothair a scríobhadh sa Ghaeilge sa tréimhse 1600 -1900. Déanfar cúram den teanga is den litríocht i dteannta a chéile; cuimseoidh an cúrsa idir staidéar téacsúil agus anailís liteartha. Iniúchfar cúlra na dtéacsanna go mion agus pléifear an chritic agus an tráchtaireacht atá déanta orthu go dtí seo.
IRST 60314:01 (Graduate Course)
MW 11:45-1:00
Susan Harris
Theatrical Realism
Ever since realism became the dominant mode of the nineteenth-century stage, most avant-garde movements in Western drama have defined themselves against it. But what exactly is realism? Where did it come from, and how does it change? How are spectators persuaded to “recognize” certain conventions, strategies, or content as “realistic” and then to reject those conventions and accept new ones? Is realism inherently conservative as many of its critics argue or does it contain the revolutionary potential that realist playwrights so often claim for it? Now that once-radical antirealist techniques have been adopted by commercial theaters, does realism still exist? And how is the practice of realism on the modern or contemporary stage related to changing conceptions of human nature, human behavior, human society, or the “real world”? This course will investigate the practice and the theory of realism in English-language theater from the late nineteenth to the early twenty-first century. Alongside the plays and criticism of the leading British, Irish, and American realists, we will read the critiques of realism that have emerged in contemporary critical theory. We will situate our study of realism in its historical, political, and economic contexts, and we will also look at the acting and production techniques that made realism possible. Playwrights may include but are not necessarily limited to: George Bernard Shaw, T. C. Murray, J. M. Synge, Sean O’Casey, Teresa Deevy, John Osborne, Arnold Wesker, EdwardBond, Brian Friel, Lillian Helmann, Clifford Odets, Eugene O’Neill, Arthur Miller, Sam Shepard, August Wilson, David Mamet, Conor Macpherson, Tony Kushner. Students will produce one conference-length (10-page) paper and one seminar-length (20-25 page) paper and will be responsible for at least one in-class presentation.