Fall Courses 2009 Cúrsaí an Fhómhair 2009

IRST 10101:01
MWF 10:40-11:30, R 9:30-10:20
Tara MacLeod
Beginning Irish I
No prior knowledge of the Irish language required. This course provides an enjoyable introduction to modern Irish. Energetic teachers in small classes teach basic language skills and prepare students to conduct conversations and read authentic texts. Extensive use is made of role-play and interactive teaching methods. Irish 10101 is a superb opportunity to learn a new language, explore Irish/Celtic culture, and investigate the linguistic politics of the only minority language offered at Notre Dame. In addition to satisfying the language requirement of the College of Arts and Letters and the College of Science, Irish satisfies the popular Irish Studies minor’s requirements, and selected students will have an opportunity to study in Dublin, Ireland.
IRST 10101:02
MWF 11:45-12:35, T 11:00-11:50
Muiris Ó Meara
Beginning Irish I
No prior knowledge of the Irish language required. This course provides an enjoyable introduction to modern Irish. Energetic teachers in small classes teach basic language skills and prepare students to conduct conversations and read authentic texts. Extensive use is made of role-play and interactive teaching methods. Irish 10101 is a superb opportunity to learn a new language, explore Irish/Celtic culture, and investigate the linguistic politics of the only minority language offered at Notre Dame. In addition to satisfying the language requirement of the College of Arts and Letters and the College of Science, Irish satisfies the popular Irish Studies minor’s requirements, and selected students will have an opportunity to study in Dublin, Ireland.
IRST 10102:01
MWF 10:40-11:30, T 11:00-11:50
Muireann Ni Bheaglaoich
Beginning Irish II

A second semester of instruction in the Irish Language. This course is a continuation of IRST 10101 and further develops the students’ linguistic ability and knowledge of Irish. Role-play, pair work and group work, written exercise and dialogue are used to expand the student’s vocabulary, and cultivate a deeper understanding of the language. Students read basic texts and view a select number of authentic materials including some videos. Students are required to have passed Irish 101. In addition to satisfying the language requirement of the College of Arts and Letters, Irish satisfies the popular Irish Studies Minor’s requirements and selected students will have an opportunity to study in Dublin, Ireland.
IRST 10102:02
MWF 11:45-12:35, R 12:30-1:20
Tara MacLeod
Beginning Irish II
A second semester of instruction in the Irish Language. This course is a continuation of IRST 10101 and further develops the students’ linguistic ability and knowledge of Irish. Role-play, pair work and group work, written exercise and dialogue are used to expand the student’s vocabulary, and cultivate a deeper understanding of the language. Students read basic texts and view a select number of authentic materials including some videos. Students are required to have passed Irish 101. In addition to satisfying the language requirement of the College of Arts and Letters, Irish satisfies the popular Irish Studies Minor’s requirements and selected students will have an opportunity to study in Dublin, Ireland.
IRST 20103:01
MWF 10:40-11:30
Sarah McKibben
Intermediate Irish
Continuation of the study of the Irish language with increased emphasis on the ability to read 20th-century literary work in the original Irish.
IRST 20120:01
TR 9:30-10:45
Brian Ó Conchubhair
The Irish Short Story
This course introduces students to the themes, motifs, approaches and various forms common to the Irish short story as well as the critical debates associated with the genre. We begin with a survey of the literary history and cultural politics of Ireland in the nineteenth and the emergence of the Irish short story and compare it to the American and French story, before considering the relationship between folklore and literature and the origins of the modern short story form. Having discussed various theories of the short story, we proceed to examine the interactive relationship between orality and print culture, tradition and modernity, native and foreign, natural/authentic and artificial/other. Among the authors we read in detail are: George Moore, P.H. Pearse, James Joyce, Pádraic Ó Conaire, Máirtín Ó Cadhain, Frank O’Connor, Sean O’Faolain, Liam Ó Flaithearta/Liam O’Flaherty, Seamus Ó Grianna, Seosamh Mac Grianna, Angela Bourke, Samuel Beckett, Máire Mhac an tSaoi, Pádraic Breathnach, Seán Mac Mathúna, Micheál Ó Conghaile, Alan Titley, Dara Ó Conaola and Eilís Ní Dhuibhne. Stories are read primarily as literary texts that shed light on evolving cultural, political and social conditions and provide incisive insights into the Irish literary and cultural tradition. This course is an ideal introduction to literary criticism and cultural studies. No prior knowledge of Irish or Ireland is required. All texts will be available in English.
IRST 20538:01
TR 11:00-12:15
Sean O’Brien
Irish Prison Literature
Along with the church, the university and the army, the prison is one of the central institutions in Ireland, and literature has traditionally been the way prisoners protest, resist, and critique their harrowing experiences. In this course we will examine work written by men and women during and after their incarceration, including major literary figures (Brendan Behan and Oscar Wilde), key figures in Irish history (Jeremiah O’Donovan Rossa and Tom Clarke), and revolutionary women (Maude Gonne and Kathleen Clarke). Course requirements include response papers, presentations and a research paper.
IRST 21601:01
MW 4:30-5:45
James McKenna
Irish and American Tap Dance

This course will teach a range of fundamental steps.
IRST 30107:01
TR 11:00-12:15
Peter McQuillan
The Hidden Ireland
The Hidden Ireland denotes both a book and a concept. The book was written by Daniel Corkery in 1924 and was an immediate success as it encapsulated a version of Irish history which had not hitherto been available to the general public; it is still considered to be a classic of its kind. The concept promoted the notion that history should emanate from “below” and should not be confined to the elites and governing classes. Both book and concept have had a profound impact on our understanding of Irish identity, Irish history, and Irish literature. This course will examine the book in depth and utilize it to open a window on the hidden Ireland of the 18th century. The cultural, historical, and literary issues which are raised by the book will be studied in the context of the poetry of the period. Poetry will be read in translation.
IRST 30111:01
MW 3:00-4:15
Ian Kuijt
Archaeology of Ireland
This course examines the cultural and historical trajectory of the archaeology of Ireland through a series of richly illustrated lectures, organized chronologically, that trace cultural, social, and technological developments from the Neolithic through the Viking period. Integrated with this lecture series, and running concurrently on alternate days, will be a series of seminar and discussion classes focused upon a number of anthropological and archaeological issues related to each of these periods of time. This includes the emergence of the unique systems of communities, and the development of systems of metallurgy in the Iron Age. Other classes will touch upon the topics of regionalism and identity and contact at different periods of time, mortuary practices and ritual, and discussion of village life in ring forts during the Bronze Age.
IRST 30325:01
TR 3:30-4:45
Rory Rapple
Early Medieval Ireland
Consideration of the period between 950 and 1400 is of crucial importance in understanding Irish history. This course not only covers the range of continuities and radical discontinuities that marked Ireland’s development during this time, but charts the attempted conquest of the entire country by the English Crown. The lecture series also seeks to answer a number of questions. Why did the Papacy give the English Crown sovereignty over Ireland? Why did a country like Ireland, on the verge of attaining political and economic centralization, not organize better resistance to English attempts to subdue it? Why did the English colony fail to prove more successful in exerting its will over indigenous Irish potentates? Culturally the period also witnessed the growing assimilation of English invaders to the norms of Gaelic Irish politics and society. Lastly, events in Ireland had a serious influence on developments in England, Wales and Scotland, provoking, amongst other things, the fall of the Plantagenet dynasty and an attempted invasion by King Robert I of Scotland.
IRST 30415:01
MWF 9:35-10:25
James Smyth
Irish History, 1600-1800
This course explores the main themes in Irish histories from the plantation of Ulster, after 1603, to the rebellion of 1798 and the Act of Union with Great Britain in 1800. Attention focuses on plantation, colonization, and religious conflict; the Cromwellian reconquest and the Williamite wars in the 17th century, and the anti-Catholic penal laws and rise of Protestant Ascendancy in the 19th century. This dramatic and formative period witnessed the emergence of many of the forces and rivalries that shaped modern Irish politics and society and continues to generate lively disagreement among historians today.
IRST 30416:01
TR 11:00-12:15
Rory Rapple
Tudor England: Politics and Honor
The period from 1485 to 1603, often feted as something of a ‘Golden Age’ for England, saw that country undergo serious changes that challenged the traditional ways in which the nation conceived of itself. These included the break from Rome, the loss of England’s foothold in France, and the unprecedented experience of monarchical rule by women. Each of these challenges demanded creative political responses and apologetic strategies harnessing intellectual resources from classical, Biblical, legal, chivalric and ecclesiastical sources. This course will examine these developments. It will also look at how the English, emerging from under the shadow of the internecine dynastic warfare of the fifteenth century, sought to preserve political stability and ensure a balance between continuity and change, and, furthermore, how individuals could use these unique circumstances to their own advantage.
IRST 30442:01
MWF 12:50-1:40
Melinda Grimsley-Smith
Medicine and Disease in Modern Ireland
Ireland is among a handful of modern nations whose histories have been thoroughly transformed by disease events. These events, and the Great Famine in particular, are never simple "visitations of providence" that afflict an undifferentiated populace. They are, rather, inextricably linked with existing social structures and the exercise of power. Changes in government and society from the 1801 Act of Union with Great Britain through the relief of the penal laws against Catholics, emigration, electoral and land reform, and independence in the twentieth century are reflected in the health (or lack thereof) of the Irish people. This course, therefore, is intended to introduce students to the social and political history of modern Ireland as seen through the lens of health and disease. While focusing on Irish conditions, we will discuss issues that remain especially relevant in our own time, including: Who is responsible for health? Is health a universal right? Who is the "public" in public health? Where are the boundaries of medical expertise, and how are they determined?
IRST 40014:01
TR 12:30-1:45
Mark Pilkinton
Anglo-Irish Theatre, 1700-1990
Students of English theatre and drama often ignore both the overt and covert contributions made by Ireland, its people, and its culture. Many of the greatest English playwrights since the Restoration have in fact been Irish, Anglo-Irish, or heavily influenced by Ireland, and this discussion-oriented course will examine and explore this important symbiosis in terms of theatre, history, and society. Both in terms of internal aspects and external relations, the course will examine a dozen significant Anglo-Irish playwrights writing in English including Congreve, Goldsmith Sheridan, O’Keeffe, Boucicault, Yeats, Lady Gregory, Synge, O’Casey, Shaw, Wilde, Beckett, Behan, and Friel. We will relate a play (the drama) to the production history of that play (the theatre) while exploring both the larger societal issues of the times, internally to Ireland and externally to England, France, and the United States while also looking at the important World Drama component (as seen with Yeats and Japanese Noh).
IRST 40112:01
TR 2:00-3:15
Bríona Nic Dhiarmada
A Gendered Voice
This course will focus on the interstices of gender and cultural identity in the work of Nuala Ní Dhomhnaill, the foremost contemporary poet writing in Irish. Her poetry will be situated within a theoretical framework which draws, inter alia, on recent feminist scholarship. It will address theories of the feminine as well as the specificities of Irish-language literary and oral discourses and their impact on Ní Dhomhnaill’s poetic practice. The course will also address the implications of translation. While texts will be read in English, there will be an opportunity for close textual comparisons with the original Irish-language poems.
IRST 40420:01
TR 12:30-1:45
Mary Smyth
19th and 20th Century Scottish Literature
This course will survey major authors, genres, and themes of the literature of Scotland from the era of Burns to the present.
IRST 40506:01
TR 12:30-1:45
Susan Harris
Modern Irish Drama
A study both the drama produced by the playwrights of the Irish literary renaissance--W.B. Yeats, J.M. Synge, Lady Gregory, and Sean O’Casey--and the political struggle for Irish independence that was taking place at the same time.
IRST 40510
TR 3:30-4:45
Matthew Campbell
Romantic Ireland
A study of the romantic theme in Irish literature from Edgeworth and Moore to the young Yeats and Joyce. This course will include poetry, fiction, drama and aesthetics.
IRST 60309:01
W 6:00-9:00
Breandan Ó Buachalla
Clasaicí na Gaeilge
Déanfar staidéar sa chúrsa seo ar na príomhshaothair a scríobhadh sa Ghaeilge sa tréimhse 1600 -1900. Déanfar cúram den teanga is den litríocht i dteannta a chéile; cuimseoidh an cúrsa idir staidéar téacsúil agus anailís liteartha. Iniúchfar cúlra na dtéacsanna go mion agus pléifear an chritic agus an tráchtaireacht atá déanta orthu go dtí seo.