Fall Courses 2011 Cúrsaí an Fhómhair 2011

 

Beginning Irish I-- IRST 10101:01
MWF 9:35-10:25
Ronan Doherty
No prior knowledge of the Irish language required. This course provides an enjoyable introduction to modern Irish. Energetic teachers in small classes teach basic language skills and prepare students to conduct conversations and read authentic texts. Extensive use is made of role-play and interactive teaching methods. Irish 10101 is a superb opportunity to learn a new language, explore Irish/Celtic culture, and investigate the linguistic politics of the only minority language offered at Notre Dame. In addition to satisfying the language requirement of the College of Arts and Letters and the College of Science, Irish satisfies the popular Irish Studies minor’s requirements, and selected students will have an opportunity to study in Dublin, Ireland.
Beginning Irish I--IRST 10101:03
MWF 1:55-2:45
Mary O’Callaghan
No prior knowledge of the Irish language required. This course provides an enjoyable introduction to modern Irish. Energetic teachers in small classes teach basic language skills and prepare students to conduct conversations and read authentic texts. Extensive use is made of role-play and interactive teaching methods. Irish 10101 is a superb opportunity to learn a new language, explore Irish/Celtic culture, and investigate the linguistic politics of the only minority language offered at Notre Dame. In addition to satisfying the language requirement of the College of Arts and Letters and the College of Science, Irish satisfies the popular Irish Studies minor’s requirements, and selected students will have an opportunity to study in Dublin, Ireland.
Beginning Irish II--IRST 10102:01
MWF 9:35-10:25
Mary O’Callaghan
Second semester of instruction in the Irish Language. More emphasis will be placed on reading simple texts in Irish.
Beginning Irish II--IRST 10102:02
MWF 10:40-11:30
Tara MacLeod
Second semester of instruction in the Irish Language. More emphasis will be placed on reading simple texts in Irish.
Intermediate Irish--IRST 20103:01
MWF 1:55-2:45
Tara MacLeod
Continuation of the study of the Irish Language with increased emphasis on the ability to read 20th-century literary work in the original Irish.
Intermediate Irish--IRST 20103:02
MWF 10:40-11:30
Mary O’Callaghan
Continuation of the study of the Irish Language with increased emphasis on the ability to read 20th-century literary work in the original Irish.
The Hidden Ireland--IRST 20107:01
TR 11:00-12:15
Peter McQuillan
The Hidden Ireland denotes both a book and a concept. The book was written by Daniel Corkery in 1924 and was an immediate success as it encapsulated a version of Irish history which had not hitherto been available to the general public; it is still considered to be a classic of its kind. The concept promoted the notion that history should emanate from “below” and should not be confined to the elites and governing classes. Both book and concept have had a profound impact on our understanding of Irish identity, Irish history, and Irish literature. This course will examine the book in depth and utilize it to open a window on the hidden Ireland of the 18th century. The cultural, historical, and literary issues which are raised by the book will be studied in the context of the poetry of the period. Poetry will be read in translation.
Verbal Arts and Oral Traditions--IRST 20108:01
TR 2:00-3:15
Diarmuid Ó Giolláin
This course will examine the practice, practitioners and different genres of the verbal arts:the folktale, legends, epic, proverb, riddle, etc., and will look at the different functions of these genres. It will also look at the research traditions devoted to the study of what has been variously termed folk narrative, oral literature, orature, as well as the verbal arts.
Coming-of-Age Novels--IRST 20314:01
MW 3:00-4:15
Shan-Yun Huang
This course will explore the ways in which the development of an individual from childhood to early adulthood is depicted in literature in different periods and cultural contexts ranging from Victorian England to late 20th-century, Celtic Tiger Ireland. The readings include canonical works by Charlotte Brontë, Charles Dickens, James Joyce, as well as more contemporary Irish novels. As we read, we will try to figure out how “coming of age” is understood and achieved in different times and also consider the social function of coming-of-age novels.
Irish America--IRST 20531:01
MW 4:30-5:45
Ailbhe Darcy
This course is an opportunity to see the United States and its culture from a new, sidelong perspective and to sample the rich Irish literary tradition. Emigration to the United States has been a major theme for Irish literature since the 18th century, when famine forced masses of Irish people to board the “coffin ships” and cross the Atlantic in the hope of a better life, a phenomenon treated in novels and plays by writers like Brian Moore, Brian Friel, Joseph O’Connor and Frank McCourt. Today, in an era of cheap flights, Skype and immigration control, moving Stateside has a very different slant, as we shall see from the poetry of Paul Muldoon and Vona Groarke. Finally, through works like The Butcher Boy and The Commitments, we'll look also at the export of North American culture to Ireland, where that culture has variously been seen as a route to escapism, a means to rebel or a temptation to sin.
Anglo-Irish Identities--IRST 20541:01
TR 3:30-4:45
Christopher Fox
Observers of the political and cultural problems which continue to plague relations between the modern Irish State, six counties in the north of Ireland, and Great Britain cannot fail to note that the unresolved differences that have festered over the last two hundred years had their roots in the traumas of the preceding centuries of English colonialism in Ireland. Focusing on that crucial period in Irish culture, this course will explore the complex and contested cultural, political, and ideological identities of a group we have come to call the Anglo-Irish. How did they imagine themselves as a community, define themselves as a group? How did they differentiate themselves from others? We will examine these questions of identity and difference in several exemplary writers, beginning with Giraldus Cambrensis and with Edmund Spenser, author of a View of the Present State of Ireland (1596) composed during the initial phase of Tudor colonialism and published posthumously in 1633. We will move onto works by key figures who have dominated our understanding of eighteenth-century Ireland, including selections from Jonathan Swift, George Berkeley, Edmund Burke and Maria Edgeworth. We will conclude the course with some reading of Oscar Wilde. Students can expect a term paper, a midterm, and a final.
Archaeology of Ireland--IRST 30111:01
MW 3:00-4:15
Ian Kuijt
This course examines the cultural and historical trajectory of the archaeology of Ireland through a series of richly illustrated lectures, organized chronologically, that trace cultural, social, and technological developments from the Neolithic through the Viking period. Integrated with this lecture series, and running concurrently on alternate days, will be a series of seminar and discussion classes focused upon a number of anthropological and archaeological issues related to each of these periods of time. This includes the emergence of the unique systems of communities, and the development of systems of metallurgy in the Iron Age. Other classes will touch upon the topics of regionalism and identity and contact at different periods of time, mortuary practices and ritual, and discussion of village life in ring forts during the Bronze Age.
Swift to Heaney: Irish Poetry Since 1700--IRST 30124:01
TR 2:00-3:15
James Hamrick
This course introduces students to Irish poetry from the early eighteenth century to the present. We will cover major Anglo-Irish and English-language poets such as Jonathan Swift, William Butler Yeats and Seamus Heaney, as well as major Irish-language poets including Aogán Ó Rathaille, Brian Merriman, Seán Ó Ríordáin and Nuala Ní Dhomhnaill. The poets and their poetry will be discussed in terms of language and national identity, as well as their place in Irish history. With Swift, for example, we will discuss what it means to be Anglo-Irish, to be Protestant and to write in English in a time when the vast majority of the Irish people are Catholic and speak Irish. Students will be introduced to terms such as hybridity and colonialism and will consider the bases on which we can make claims for a poem's “Irishness.” Similarly, with Irish-language poets like Ó Rathaille we will discuss both the choice and the necessity to write in Irish, the implications of language in terms of national identity and how we come to grips with the complexities of Ireland's fundamentally bilingual literary history. Although we will be reading the poetry from Irish historical perspectives, our critical approach will take inspiration from a distinctly English poet. W.H. Auden once wrote that a critic should approach a poem by saying, “Here is a verbal contraption. How does it work?” We will indeed consider the technical question of how a poem “works,” but we will at the same time consider, for example, the linguistic importance of Merriman’s use of the couplet, the political implications of Thomas Moore’s feminine rhymes, or how Swift uses meter and line length in imitating Hiberno-English speech.
Great Irish Writers--IRST 30309:01
TR 12:30-1:45
Sarah McKibben
This course will move from Celtic warriors to the (late lamented) Celtic tiger, from warrior queens and epic heroes to global jetsetters, looking at masterworks originally written in Ireland's language. We’ll look at the great Irish epic the Táin Bó Cúailnge (“The Cattle Raid of Cooley”), which tells a rollicking good story (body-morphing battle frenzy! treachery! boasting! tricolored hair!) while tackling confounding social and political concerns (such as chaos, or, what you do with a bunch of overheated, underemployed young men). Battle-warmed, we’ll next look at the poetic tradition in Irish between approximately 1540 and 1900, an era when England, later Britain, consolidates its conquest and colonization of the country. In this context, writers craftily defend Irish culture, manhood and authority while recalibrating Irish identity, sometimes in deadly earnest, sometimes by making fun of what they cannot necessarily change. Finally, we will turn to more recent writing in Irish from 1900 to the present, including autobiography, the funniest short comic novel ever written, a short story or two, and some terrific modern poetry with plenty of love, desire, and weird supernatural encounters. All materials will be read in English translation.
The Irish Language Lyric Song Tradition--IRST 30362:01
TR 9:30-10:45
Cathal Goan
The music, the meters, the magic of the Irish language lyric song tradition will be explored in this course spanning the known history of the most enduring songs; their transmission and migration in oral, written and sound-recorded form; the sources from which draw inspiration and their influence in translation on writers and performers as diverse as W.B. Yeats and Sinéad O’Connor. Using recordings, live performance and close textual analysis the course will aim to chart the journeys of these songs through the centuries and offer insights into their lasting appeal.
British History: 1660-1800--IRST 30413:01
MWF 9:35-10:25
James Smyth
This course of lectures and readings concentrates on British (that is, Scottish as well as English) history from the restoration of monarchy in 1660 to the great crisis detonated by the French Revolution and war in the 1790s. Themes include the politics of Protestant dissent, political ideologies, the role of parliament, Jacobitism, and the rise of the radical parliamentary reform movement.
Irish Politics 1916-2009: From Colonialism to the Celtic Tiger and Beyond--IRST 30423:01
MW 11:45-1:00
Sean McGraw
Ireland, a country rich in history, has undergone dramatic changes in the twentieth century beginning with its fight for independence and culminating in its meteoric rise during the Celtic Tiger years. What explains Ireland’s distinctive political trajectory and how does it compare to other European nations? How should we understand the Celtic Tiger, the rapid series of social, economic and political transformations that have occurred within Ireland since the 1990s? This course explores these questions by studying the political actors and institutional settings of Irish politics, the nature of political influence and the shaping of political priorities, and the forces that shape policy outcomes. It will address such critical issues as the legacies of colonialism and civil war, nationalism, democratization, the relationship between the Church and State, the Northern Ireland Troubles and the European Union. While the course focuses on the Republic of Ireland, it will adopt a broad comparative perspective, situating the country both within the wider global context and within the political science literature.
The Irish Hunger Strikes--IRST 40111:01
TR 3:30-4:45
Bríona Nic Dhiarmada
We remember them with pride for on hunger strike they died these brave men were Ireland’s sons they were the men of ‘81 Republican ballad “We’ll never forget you Jimmy Sands” Loyalist graffiti in East Belfast shortly after Bobby Sands death on hunger strike. Course description: Thirty years ago, in 1981, Bobby Sands and nine other Irish republican prisoners died on hunger strike in the Maze Prison outside Belfast. Their deaths and the British response were pivotal in the history of the recent “Troubles.” It would hardly be an exaggeration to say that the fallout from the 1981 Hunger strike had the same momentous impact on nationalists and on Irish politics as had the executions of the leaders of 1916. This course will examine the 1981 hunger strike in the context of previous political hunger strikes in Ireland and will examine both its genesis, the strike itself and its aftermath. It will pay particular attention to the ways in which the political hunger strike and the 1981 hunger strike in particular is “remembered” and commemorated, drawing on the work of Paul Ricoeur among others. We will engage with a variety of texts and sources including memoirs, news reports, documentaries, film and songs.
Culture and Politics of Northern Ireland--IRST 40513:01
TR 3:30-4:45
Mary Smyth
This course explores the politics of culture, and the cultures of politics, in the North of Ireland during the twentieth century. Using a multiplicity of genres - drama, fiction, poetry, film, painting, and documentary material - we will unravel the history behind partition, the causes of the Troubles, and the nature of the conflict. Among the key moments or events upon which we will concentrate are the Somme, the sinking of the Titanic, Bloody Sunday, the hunger strikes, Drumcree, the Anglo-Irish Agreement, and the Shankill Butchers. Certain key themes will stretch through our semester's work. Among these are sectarianism, the relationship between violence and culture, the role of religion in the state, borders, hatred, identity, and issues of social and political justice. Some of the writers whose work we will read are Seamus Heaney, Frank McGuinness, Sam Thompson, John Montague, Seamus Deane, Eoin MacNamee, Robert MacLiam Wilson, Colin McCann, and Thomas Kinsella.
Wilde and Synge: Art as Subversion--IRST 40530:01
TR 11:00-12:15
Declan Kiberd
On the surface Oscar Wilde and John Millington Synge seemed very different kinds of artist. Wilde won fame for his witty portrayals of the English aristocracy, whereas Synge was celebrated for his lyrical depiction of an impoverished Irish peasantry. Wilde pursued a career on the London stage and in high society, whereas Synge embraced a life of austerity and wrote for the nascent Irish national theatre in Dublin. Wilde was often dismissed as a mere entertainer, who was so fixated on his audience that he risked the betrayal of his subject. Synge was understood to be a pure artist, so committed to his subjects that he risked the alienation of his audience. Yet these products of Protestant Dublin had much in common: a fascination with fairy tales and folklore; an anarchist ideal in politics; a belief in the artistic value of lying and in the truth of masks; and a distrust of a merely representational art. For both men art should be an improvement on rather than a reflection of nature; and they saw their writing as a utopian project, addressed not just to present realities but to future possibilities. This course will offer an in-depth reading of the work of Wilde and Synge, assessing the differing opportunities and constraints faced by playwrights in London and Dublin in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. It will consider the ways in which both dramatists, by challenging their audiences and subverting traditional forms of art, helped to create a modern Irish literary movement. Oscar Wilde texts for discussion: Fairy Tales, The Picture of Dorian Gray, A Woman of No Importance, Lady Windermere’s Fan, The Importance of Being Earnest, “The Decay of Lying,” “The Truth of Masks,” “The Ballad of Reading Gaol,” and poems, Salomé, De Profundis available in Collected Works, one volume (Collins). JM Synge texts for discussion: Riders to the Sea, The Shadow of the Glen, The Tinker’s Wedding, The Well of the Saints, The Playboy of the Western World, Deirdre of the Sorrows, The Aran Islands available in Collected Works, Volumes 2, 3, 4 (OUP).
Seminar: Modern Irish Fiction--IRST 43504:01
TR 11:00-12:15
Mary Smyth
A close examination of the works of major Irish writers of fiction after the Second World War--Flann O’Brien, Frank O'Connor, Mary Lavin, Patrick Kavanagh, Edna O’Brien, Michael MacLaverty, Sam Hanna Bell, and Brian Moore.
Irish Connections--IRST 43511:01
MW 3:00-4:15
Denis O’Hearn
This seminar will examine connections between Ireland and the rest of the world with respect to economic development, social movements, and imprisonment. Coverage will be both historical and contemporary. The section on development will analyze and compare Ireland’s place in the 19th century British-led Atlantic economy with the 20th century U.S.-led world-economy, ending with an analysis of the “Celtic tiger” period and its influence on other developing countries/regions, including developmental states in Eastern Europe and Turkey. The section on social movements will begin with nineteenth-century Irish movements and their connections to British and U.S. movements, including the Molly Maguires and emergent labor movement in the northeastern U.S. It will move through the period of partition/independence to the civil rights and armed liberation movements that emerged in the 1960s and their connections to movements in North America and the so-called Third World. Finally, the course will look at connections between social movements and imprisonment, including political imprisonment, prison protests, and state strategies of isolating prisoners in Ireland, Turkey, and U.S. supermax.