Spring Courses 2006 Cúrsaí An Earraigh 2006

IRST 101:01
T H 11:00-12:15
Sarah McKibben
Beginning Irish I
An introduction to modern spoken and written Irish: basic principles of grammar and sentence structure, as well as core vocabulary. Emphasis is placed on the application of these principles in every-day situations. Students learn how to conduct simple conversations: talking about oneself and asking information of others; talking about family and home; describing the weather and daily activities.
IRST 101:02
MWF 10:40-11:30
Peter McQuillan
Beginning Irish I
An introduction to modern spoken and written Irish: basic principles of grammar and sentence structure, as well as core vocabulary. Emphasis is placed on the application of these principles in every-day situations. Students learn how to conduct simple conversations: talking about oneself and asking information of others; talking about family and home; describing the weather and daily activities.
IRST 101:03
T H 12:30-1:45
Brian Ó Conchubhair
Beginning Irish I
This course is a fun introduction for absolute beginners to the modern Irish language. Students learn basic language skills, pronunciation, sentence structure, how to talk about oneself and asking information of others. Extensive use is made of audio and video tapes, role play exercises and dialogue.
IRST 102:01
T H 2:00-3:15
Sarah McKibben
Beginning Irish II
Second semester of instruction in the Irish Language. Continuation of IRST 101/501. More emphasis will be placed on reading simple texts in Irish. This course satisfies Irish Studies requirements.
IRST 102:02
MWF 9:30-10:25
Peter McQuillan
Beginning Irish II
Second semester of instruction in the Irish Language. Continuation of IRST 101/501. More emphasis will be placed on reading simple texts in Irish. This course satisfies Irish Studies requirements.
IRST 103:01
T H 11:00-12:15
Brian Ó Conchubhair
Intermediate Irish
A continuation of Irish 101 and 102 with increased emphasis on the ability to read 20th century literary works in the original Irish.
IRST 228:01
M W 4:30-5:45
James McKenna
Irish and American Dance
This course will teach a range of fundamental American tap steps in addition to at least two finished tap dance pieces set to CD music. Several hard show Irish tap dances will be taught and depending on the ability of the students, several other completed dances are possible. The particular range of individual tap pieces learned will permit the student to use these steps and expand on them to fit a wide diversity of music types and rhythms. Although the class is intended for students who have never learned tap previously, both elementary and middle range students have found the class suited to their needs. Tap shoes are a necessity and should be purchased before the class begins. Introductory class for beginners.
IRST 322A:01
T H 3:30-4:45
Éamonn Ó Ciardha
The Bandit and the Outlaw in History
The bandit and outlaw (in the guise of the 'Tory', 'rapparee' 'moss-trooper' 'highlanderer' and 'borderer') occupy a pivotal position in the history, popular culture and fiction of Ireland, Britain, American and Australia. Historians, however, have often found it difficult to follow these elusive figures through the battlefields, bogs, borderlands, badlands and bush. This has not been made easier by the transformation of the bandit in Irish, British, American and Australian historiography and hagiography. The popular historians, political commentators and reporters of the late eighteenth, nineteenth and twentieth centuries often portrayed him as a 'noble robber' and Robin Hood-like figure. Irish nationalists in the nineteenth and twentieth century viewed him as a prototype nationalist icon: the 'outlaw rapparee' would be eulogized in popular song, chapbook and verse. He has remained the focus of a number of recent popular histories, documentaries and films. Nevertheless, the elevated position of the bandit within the nationalist pantheon has come under renewed assault in recent years. At the outset, this course will explore the nature and activities of bandits and outlaws in their many forms and guises in Ireland, American and Australia. These will include a consideration of banditry as a form of guerilla warfare in the late medieval and early modern period and as an aspect of the Gaelic customs of raiding and 'coshering'. It will seek to examine attitudes towards crime, criminality and punishment in the early modern and modern periods, particularly in the context of the Tudor colonial experiment and ongoing plantation, republicanism and the struggle for independence. Another primary focus will be an appraisal of the impact of the bandit and outlaw on the English and Scottish settler psyche and the image of the Irish, Scottish and English bandit the contemporary media. This evolved from the barbarian 'wild Irishman and savage (as represented by the recalcitrant Feagh McHugh O'Byrne as the O'Neills of Tyrone) of the sixteenth century to the blundering Sir Lucius O'Trigger of the later-eighteenth century. In stark contrast to the unflattering portrayal of the 'tory' in English literature, an examination of Irish poetry and prose suggests an emerging cult of the outlaw in the Irish literary tradition from the mid-sixteenth century. The Irish poet, through the 'Marbhna', 'Tuireamh' and 'Caoineadh' of the Irish literary tradition, often extolled the virtues and noble lineage of the tory, rapparee or highwayman. They regularly voiced disdain for their betrayers and persecutors and excoriated the political and legal system that brought them to the scaffold. These themes also survive in the popular song-culture from the late eighteenth century onwards.
IRST 327B:01
MWF 9:35-10:25
Jim Smyth
Irish History II
This course consists of lectures and readings examining Irish (mainly) political history and Anglo-Irish relations from the Act of Union (1801) up to and including the Northern Ireland 'troubles' and the peace process. It focuses on religious conflict, catholic emancipation, famine, the development of romantic and revolutionary nationalism, unionism, rebellion, the changing nature of Anglo-Irish relations, modernization, and the special problems of the North. A mid-semester paper/essay and a final are required.
IRST 371A:01
MWF 11:45-12:35
Christopher Fox
Co-req. ENGL 371T
Introduction to Irish Writers
As the visit to campus last year of the most recent Irish winner of the Nobel Prize in Literature, Seamus Heaney, suggests, this small island has produced a disproportionate number of great writers. Designed as a general literature course, the class will introduce the student to a broad range of Irish writers in English from the eighteenth century to the present. Writers will include Jonathan Swift, Maria Edgeworth, Oscar Wilde, James Joyce, William Butler Yeats, Elizabeth Bowen, Brian Friel, and John McGahern. We will also look at recent film versions of several of these writers' works, including Wilde's Importance of Being Earnest. Themes to be explored include representations of "national character" and the relationships between religion and national identity, gender and nationalism, Ireland and England, and "Irishness" and "Englishness." Students can expect a midterm, a paper (5-6 pages typed), and a final.Note: Students are also required to register for one section of ENGL 371T, Introduction to Irish Writers - Discussion, F 11:45-12:35.
IRST 372E:01
MWF 1:55-2:45
John Witek
Anglo-Irish Literature: Cultured Misrule, Dissolute Lords and Rebel Countesses
From the Act of Union in 1800 to the first decades of the twentieth century, the Anglo-Irish dominated the political and literary life of Ireland. Then, in a few decades, they disappeared from Ireland's public life. They left behind a troubled history and a literary legacy that forms a central portion of the canon of "Irish" literature today. This course will look at this "Irish" identity as it figures in a sampling of "Irish" literature. The reading for the course will be: Maria Edgeworth, Castle Rackrent; Sheridan Le Fanu's horror stories The House by the Churchyard and In a Glass Darkly; and Somerville and Ross's Stories of an Irish RM. We will also look at the poetry of W.B. Yeats and the fiction of Elizabeth Bowen. We will explore some contemporary Irish literature as well, most notably John Banville's novels The Newton Letter and Birchwood, and Molly Keane's novel Good Behavior. Required work for the course includes two tests (a midterm and a final), one essay of 5-8 pages, and biweekly quizzes.
IRST 379C:01
MWF 11:45-12:35
Jim Wurtz
Irish Gothic From Union to Troubles
Ireland is an island with a long and troubled history, as well as a deep tradition of producing great writers and vital literature. This class will examine the ways that Irish literature uses ghosts, vampires, demons, and rebels, to grapple with threats facing the society, and engage with the historical unrest in 19th and 20th century Ireland, beginning with the joining of Ireland and Britain under one government with the Act of Union in 1800, through Ireland's independence in the South and the Troubles in the North in the late 20th century. We will read from a range of writers, including Sheridan LeFanu, James Joyce, Oscar Wilde, Bram Stoker, Charles Maturin, Elizabeth Bowen, and W.B Yeats. Two short papers (3pp) and one longer paper (8pp) and a final exam will be required.
IRST 435:01
T H 11:00-12:15
Aideen O'Leary
Medieval Ireland
This course covers the history and culture of Ireland from the pre-Christian era to approximately A.D. 800. For instance, we will discuss what Saint Patrick really achieved, the nature of monastic life in Ireland, and whether the Vikings were the brutal savages they are often said to be. We will also analyze the relationships between Ireland and her neighbors, especially England and Scotland. Students will be expected to draw their own conclusions on issues such as the uses and limitations of archaeology, the historical value of Celtic mythology, how the Irish related to the outside world, and Ireland's place in medieval European history. Requirements include participation in class discussion, midterm and final exams, and a research paper (10 pages approx.) on a topic of the student's choice.
IRST 449
T H 3:30-4:45
Joseph McMinn
Swift and the Arts
This course will look at the ways in which Jonathan Swift regarded the non-literary arts in eighteenth-century Ireland and England - gardening, music, architecture and painting - and how his views on those art forms are reflected in his poetry and prose. Swift was very aware of a changing artistic and literary climate during his long writing career, especially of a new appreciation amongst many writers of the 'natural' unity of the arts, a sentiment held by leading virtuosi of the period, most notably by Swift's friend, Alexander Pope. While Swift never shared Pope's enthusiasm for the new humanist learning, based on the Renaissance ideal of the 'sister arts', he was a close, usually ironic, and always entertaining observer of changing and fashionable tastes in the arts. This course will survey a wide range of Swift's works in order to illustrate his satirical dissent from the new learning associated with Enlightenment ideals, as in Gulliver's Travels, for example, or his distaste for the politics of monumental architecture, as in his satirical poem, A Character, Panegyric and Description of the Legion Club. In the broader context of eighteenth-century culture, the course tries to understand Swift's ambiguous relationship to 'modernity' and tradition, and to changing ideas about taste and refinement. Finally, the course will address the decisive influence of Ireland's colonial culture upon Swift's ambivalent relationship with the arts. Students will be expected to write one short response paper, one longer essay, and a final exam.
IRST 475B:01
T H 12:30-1:45
Maud Ellmann
Reading "Ulysses"
Who's afraid of Joyce's Ulysses? Most people, until they realize how funny it is. Joyce said, "I am only an Irish clown, a great joker at the universe" - and this statement should be taken seriously. Ulysses is a wildly inventive book, but it never loses sight of the comedy and poignancy of human life. And the better one understands the novel, the funnier it gets. This course aims to make Ulysses understandable, by reading it slowly chapter-by-chapter in the light of Homer's Odyssey and Joyce's early autobiographical novel A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man. The class will consist of a mixture of lectures and discussions. Students will be expected to meet in small groups outside class and report back on particular topics. In addition, there will be two quizzes, two 1-page papers, one 4-5 page paper (midterm), and one 7-8 page paper (final).
IRST 476
T H 11:00-12:15
Luke Gibbons
Co-req IRST 476L
Irish Film and Culture
This course will examine some of the dominant images of Ireland in film and literature, and will place their development in a wider cultural and historical context. Comparisons between film, literature, and other cultural forms will be featured throughout the course, and key stereotypes relating to gender, class, and nation will be analyzed, particularly as they bear on images of romantic Ireland and modernity, landscape, the city, religion, violence, family, and community. Particular attention will be paid to key figures such as Yeats, Synge, and Joyce, and contemporary writers such as John McGahern, William Trevor, Patrick McCabe, and Roddy Doyle will be discussed in terms of the wider implications of their work for contemporary Irish culture. The resurgence of Irish cinema and new forms of Irish writing in the past two decades will provide the main focus of the second part of the semester, tracing the emergence of new distinctive voices and images in an increasingly globalised and multi-cultural Ireland. Students are also required to register for IRST 475L, Lab: Irish Film and Culture, T, 6:00-8:30.
IRLL 501:01
T H 11:00-12:15
Sarah McKibben
Graduate Course
Beginning Irish I
An introduction to modern spoken and written Irish: basic principles of grammar and sentence structure, as well as core vocabulary. Emphasis is placed on the application of these principles in every-day situations. Students learn how to conduct simple conversations: talking about oneself and asking information of others; talking about family and home; describing the weather and daily activities.
IRLL 501:02
MWF 10:40-11:30
Peter McQuillan
Graduate Course
Beginning Irish I
An introduction to modern spoken and written Irish: basic principles of grammar and sentence structure, as well as core vocabulary. Emphasis is placed on the application of these principles in every-day situations. Students learn how to conduct simple conversations: talking about oneself and asking information of others; talking about family and home; describing the weather and daily activities.
IRLL 501:03
T H 12:30-1:4
5 Brian Ó Conchubhair
Graduate Course
Beginning Irish I
This course is a fun introduction for absolute beginners to the modern Irish language. Students learn basic language skills, pronunciation, sentence structure, how to talk about oneself and asking information of others. Extensive use is made of audio and video tapes, role play exercises and dialogue.
IRLL 502:01
T H 2:00-3:15
Sarah McKibben
Graduate Course
Beginning Irish II
Second semester of instruction in the Irish Language. Continuation of IRST 101/501. More emphasis will be placed on reading simple texts in Irish. This course satisfies Irish Studies requirements.
IRLL 502:02 MWF 9:30-10:25 Peter McQuillan Graduate Course Beginning Irish II Second semester of instruction in the Irish Language. Continuation of IRST 101/501. More emphasis will be placed on reading simple texts in Irish. This course satisfies Irish Studies requirements.
IRLL 503:01
T H 11:00-12:15
Brian Ó Conchubhair
Graduate Course
Intermediate Irish
A continuation of Irish 101 and 102 with increased emphasis on the ability to read 20th century literary works in the original Irish.
ENGL 571
T H 2:00-3:15
Susan Harris
Graduate Course
Irish Drama and Revolutionary Politics
This course will investigate the relationship between the drama produced by the Abbey Theater movement during the first decades of this century and the political struggle for Irish independence that was taking place at the same time. As part of this project, we will examine not only the plays but the responses they provoked when they were first performed, reading the texts of the plays alongside the reviews they generated and the debates that were taking place at the time in the nationalist press. We will be paying particular attention to the relationship between national and sexual politics, and how representations of gender--and audience responses to them--mediated it. We will also use our study of these plays and their historical, political, cultural and critical context to interrogate the development and definition of Irish studies itself as a discipline. Students have the option of producing either one seminar paper or two conference-length papers, and will also be responsible for at least two in-class presentations. Texts: The Yeats Reader: A Portable Compendium of Poetry, Drama and Prose. Ed. Richard J. Finneran; Modern Irish Drama. (Norton anthology.) Ed. John Harrington; The Aran Islands. J. M. Synge; The Complete Plays. J. M. Synge; Plays 2. Sean O'Casey. Course packet containing contextual materials, available in 301 O'Shaughnessy.
ENGL 573
H 6:30-9:00
Mary Burgess
Graduate Course
Modernism and the Four Nations: England, Ireland, Scotland, Wale
s This seminar examines the geographies and locations of British and Irish literary modernism. We will pay particular attention to the ways in which (especially in Scotland and Wales) modernist writers engaged with, and frequently drove, efforts to renew national identity as against an idea of 'Britishness'. We will also be exploring what Franco Moretti calls the 'literary geography' of some rather more familiar English and Irish modernist texts, and will try to get some sense of how these regional or more precisely national movements interacted with each other. This is a wide-ranging course that will involve a lot of reading in all genres. Some of the writers whose work we will read are: Virginia Woolf, D.H. Lawrence, Katherine Mansfield, Hugh MacDiarmid, Lewis Grassic Gibbon, Edwin and Willa Muir, Neil Gunn, James Joyce, Elizabeth Bowen, Denis Johnston, Patrick Kavanagh, Austin Clarke, Dylan Thomas, David Jones, Saunders Lewis, Menna Elfyn and Rhys Davies. Some of the critical/ theoretical material we will read includes work by David Harvey, Robert Crawford, Seamus Deane, Cairns Craig and Franco Moretti. Students will present on a number of occasions, and will work towards a final research paper, on which they will receive input from other seminar members.
ENGL 575:01
T H 12:30-1:45
Maud Ellmann
Graduate Course
Gender and Writing
This course focuses on the seventy years between 1871 (the publication of George Eliot's Middlemarch) and 1941 (the publication of Virginia Woolf's Between the Acts), a period of upheaval in gender relations that also witnessed the emergence of the modern professional woman writer. We will examine changing images of women of the period - the New Woman, the Suffragette, the vamp, the lesbian, the hysteric, the typist - in conjunction with changing images of men: the shell-shocked veteran, the "invert," the obsessional compulsive. Since this period also witnessed the birth of psychoanalysis, we will study Freud's works both as responses to their historical context and as (cannon) fodder for gender theory today. The course will concentrate on Irish and British authors of the period (e.g. George Eliot, Dickens, Gissing, Hardy, T.S. Eliot, Gertrude Stein, H.D., Mina Loy, Joyce, Woolf, Elizabeth Bowen), and on recent theorists of gender and sexuality such as Jacques Lacan, Julia Kristeva, Jacques Derrida, Eve Kosofsky Sedgwick, and Judith Butler. After some introductory sessions at the beginning of the semester, the class will take the form of student presentations and discussion. At each class students will either participate in presentations or submit a short position paper (1 page), addressing issues raised by the previous week's reading. A final paper of 15-20 pages is due at the end of the semester.
ENGL 577
W 6:30-9:00
Luke Gibbons
Graduate Course
Rethinking Race: Irishness, Whiteness and Postcolonialism
This seminar will discuss issues of race and representation in relation to Irish literature and culture. The threat presented by the Irish to colonial civility had less to do with visibility than with other components of racial theory, as the Celt‚ provided an ominous template for the concept of doomed races‚ and other modes of cultural contagion. The semester will begin by examining the Ossianic controversy, the romantic novel in Ireland (Edgeworth, Morgan) gaelic Gothic‚ (Maturin, Stoker), and Arnoldian Celticism. Attitudes to race during the emergence of Irish nationalism and the Literary Revival will be analysed, with particular emphasis on Joyce's understanding of race and modernity, whether in the form of colonial stereotypes or anti-semitism. The final part of the semester will address questions of race in the Ireland of the Celtic Tiger, looking particularly at representations of immigration in contemporary Irish film and literature.