Spring Courses 2007 Cúrsaí An Earraigh 2007

Beginning Irish I
IRST/IRLL 10101:01
Professor Laoise Ní Thuairisg
MWF 9:35-10:25
This course provides an enjoyable introduction to Modern Irish. Energetic teachers in small classes teach basic language skills, prepare students to conduct conversations and to read authentic texts. Extensive use is made of role-play and interactive teaching methods. Irish 10101 is a superb opportunity to learn a new language, explore Irish/Celtic culture and investigate the linguistic politics of the only minority language offered at Notre Dame. In addition Irish satisfies the College language and the popular Irish Studies Minor’s requirements. Selected students will have an opportunity to study in Dublin, Ireland. No prior knowledge of the Irish Language required.
Beginning Irish I
IRST/IRLL 10101:02
Professor Tara MacLeod
MWF 10:40-11:30
This course provides an enjoyable introduction to Modern Irish. Energetic teachers in small classes teach basic language skills, prepare students to conduct conversations and to read authentic texts. Extensive use is made of role-play and interactive teaching methods. Irish 10101 is a superb opportunity to learn a new language, explore Irish/Celtic culture and investigate the linguistic politics of the only minority language offered at Notre Dame. In addition Irish satisfies the College language and the popular Irish Studies Minor’s requirements. Selected students will have an opportunity to study in Dublin, Ireland. No prior knowledge of the Irish Language required.
Beginning Irish I
IRST/IRLL 10101:03
Professor Tara MacLeod
MWF 12:50-2:45
This course provides an enjoyable introduction to Modern Irish. Energetic teachers in small classes teach basic language skills, prepare students to conduct conversations and to read authentic texts. Extensive use is made of role-play and interactive teaching methods. Irish 10101 is a superb opportunity to learn a new language, explore Irish/Celtic culture and investigate the linguistic politics of the only minority language offered at Notre Dame. In addition Irish satisfies the College language and the popular Irish Studies Minor’s requirements. Selected students will have an opportunity to study in Dublin, Ireland. No prior knowledge of the Irish Language required.
Beginning Irish I
IRLL 10101:04
Professor Elaine Ní Neachtain
MWF 1:55-2:45
This course provides an enjoyable introduction to Modern Irish. Energetic teachers in small classes teach basic language skills, prepare students to conduct conversations and to read authentic texts. Extensive use is made of role-play and interactive teaching methods. Irish 10101 is a superb opportunity to learn a new language, explore Irish/Celtic culture and investigate the linguistic politics of the only minority language offered at Notre Dame. In addition Irish satisfies the College language and the popular Irish Studies Minor’s requirements. Selected students will have an opportunity to study in Dublin, Ireland. No prior knowledge of the Irish Language required.
Beginning Irish II
IRST/IRLL 10102:01
Professor Brian Ó Conchubhair
TR 9:30-10:45

A second semester of instruction in the Irish Language. This course is a continuation of IRST 10101 and further develops the students’ linguistic ability and knowledge of Irish. Role-play, pair work and group work, written exercise and dialogue are used to expand the student’s vocabulary, and cultivate a deeper understanding of the language. Students read basic texts and view a select number of authentic materials including some videos. Students are required to have passed Irish 10101. In addition Irish satisfies the College language and the popular Irish Studies Minor’s requirements. Selected students will have an opportunity to study in Dublin, Ireland.
Beginning Irish II
IRST/IRLL 10102:02
Professor Tara MacLeod
MWF 9:35-10:25
A second semester of instruction in the Irish Language. This course is a continuation of IRST 10101 and further develops the students’ linguistic ability and knowledge of Irish. Role-play, pair work and group work, written exercise and dialogue are used to expand the student’s vocabulary, and cultivate a deeper understanding of the language. Students read basic texts and view a select number of authentic materials including some videos. Students are required to have passed Irish 10101. In addition Irish satisfies the College language and the popular Irish Studies Minor’s requirements. Selected students will have an opportunity to study in Dublin, Ireland.
Intermediate Irish
IRST/IRLL 20103:01
Professor Hugh Fogarty
TR 11:00-12:15
Intermediate Irish This course follows on IRLL 10101 and 10102 with attention to more advanced grammatical structures, speaking and reading. You will hone your linguistic skills and also delve into some short twentieth-century texts in Irish. In addition, you will learn something about Irish culture and music. Prerequisites: you must have passed 10101 and 10102 to enroll.
Advanced Readings in Irish Culture
IRST/IRLL 20203:01
Professor Brian Ó Conchubhair
TR 12:30-1:45
Advanced Readings in Irish Culture is an advanced course focusing on reading and translating a variety of texts in the Irish language. We concentrate on further development of reading, interpretive, and technical skills mastered in previous language courses (IRLL 10101, IRLL 10102, IRLL 20101). Texts from various authors and historical periods allow students to taste different writing styles: contemporary fiction, journalism, literary criticism, historical and cultural texts. Emphasis will be on sentence structure, stylistics and syntax. Students are required to have earned a high grade in IRLL 20101 in order to take this class. At the conclusion of this course, students will be able to conduct independent research with Irish texts.
Mapping Ireland
IRST 20522:01
Professor James Wilson
TR 2:00-3:15
In this course we will read modern Irish history, film, poetry, drama, short fiction, and the novel to explore the various ways Irish artists and writers have sought to give shape to national identity and the political geography of Irish life. Our primary intention will be to read and appreciate the individual works, but over the course of the semester we shall seek to compare the different visions of nation and culture those works present. Because of Ireland's exceptional history, we may in fact discover that the central element of so much of its best art is precisely to imagine what it means to be Irish. In consequence, Irish works provide us a window through which to examine the relation between art and politics, imagination and the nation. Readings will range from John Ford's "The Quiet Man," to poems by Seamus Heaney, W. B. Yeats and Eavan Boland, to fiction by Edna O'Brien, John McGahern, and James Joyce. Assignments include four short essays, several in-class presentations, and a final exam.
Irish Heroic Literature in Modern Adaptation
IRST/IRLL 40103:01/60107
Professor Philip O’Leary
MW 11:45-1:00
Beginning with a study of the ethos of Irish heroic literature in its historic and cultural context, this course will then examine the uses, ideological, aesthetic, and personal, to which that material has been put by Irish writers of the past two centuries (WB Yeats, JM Synge, Lady Gregory, Brian Friel, Tom Murphy). Particular attention will be paid to shifting concepts of "authenticity" and the degree to which various creative artists have retained, reinterpreted, or reinvented what they perceived to be the essence of their originals. This course will suit students who Studied Celtic Heroic Literature in Fall 2006 as well as English and Medieval majors.
Saints and Kings in Celtic Ireland IRST/IRLL 30306
Professor Hugh Fogarty
TR 2:00-3:15
This course focuses on a series of encounters (in early Irish and Hiberno-Latin) between saints and kings or other royal characters. Through these stories and characters, tensions between the domains of spiritual and secular, the local and the 'national,' the native and the external, are raised, explored and (sometimes, though by no means always) resolved. Saints such as Patrick, Colmcille, Brigit, Ciarán, and Cainnech, together with kings such as Lóegaire Mac Néill, Diarmuit Mac Cerbaill, and Muirchertach Mac Erca will be studied.
Irish History to 1800
Hist 30431
Professor Enda Leaney
TR 9:30 - 10:45
This course explores the main themes in Irish History from the plantation of Ulster in 1603, to the rebellion of 1798 and the Act of Union with Great Britain in 1800. Attention focuses on plantation, colonization, and the Williamite Wars in the seventeenth century; and the anti-Catholic penal laws and rise of Protestant Ascendancy in the eighteenth century. This dramatic and formative period witnessed the emergence of many of the forces and rivalries shaping modern Irish politics and society and continues to generate lively disagreement among historians today.
19th Century Ireland
Hist 30435
Professor Enda Leaney
TR 12:30 - 1:45
This course invites students to examine the profound changes affecting Irish society in the nineteenth century. The course will focus on the social, cultural, and religious history of Ireland rather than the political (though this will not be neglected). Topics to be covered include education, emigration, religious revivals, the cultural revival, and the role of sport in Irish society.
Identities in Early Modern Irish Literature
IRST/IRLL 40303/60301
Professor Peter McQuillan
TR 3:30-4:45
The topic to be covered in this course is the formation of individual and collective identity through language, literature and history in this period. In addition to the works of the great early-modern poets (16-18th centuries) like Tadhg Dall Ó hUiginn, Dáibhí Ó Bruadair and Aogán Ó Rathaille, we will focus on such important prose works as Foras Feasa ar Éirinn, the foundation history of the "new" Irish nation of the seventeenth century. Important secondary works here will include those of Anthony D. Smith and Adrian Hastings on pre-modern forms of nationalism as well as Stephen Greenblatt on identity formation in 16th century England and Paul Friedrich on linguistic relativism and the poetic in language.
Northern Ireland Troubles
HIST 43440
Professor Jim Smyth
MW 11:45 - 1:00
This discussion-based seminar explores the history of the six north-eastern counties of Ireland which became ‘Northern Ireland’ in 1920/1. Northern Ireland remained part of the United Kingdom and had a built-in protestant unionist majority. The Catholic minority, alienated from the state from the outset, looked across the new border and to Dublin, capital of the Irish Free State, as the true site of their allegiance. Northern Ireland was thus, from the beginning, dysfunctional, scarred by sectarian violence and systematic discrimination in housing and employment. After examining the origins of the state and the early decades of it existence the seminar will turn to its main concern ‘the troubles’ which broke out in the late 1960s. The major episodes under scrutiny include the civil rights movement, Bloody Sunday, the hunger strikes, and the Good Friday Peace Agreement. Students are obliged to produce a twenty-five page essay based on original research, and many are expected to draw on the rich microcfilm archive of ‘the troubles’, the Linenhall Collection, held in the Hesburgh Library.
Political Ideologies in Europe
IRST 60230:01
Professor Jim Smyth
M 3:00-5:30
Taking 1789 as its base-line and understanding the French Revolution as seminal in shaping modern European political ideologies this course falls into three parts:
i Methodologies and concepts
ii Classic texts
iii Case-studies
Part one consists of an introduction to the study of political thought/ideas; examines key concepts such as ‘ideology’, ‘sovereignty’, ‘democracy’ and ‘freedom’; and investigates canonicity – or the ‘Great Books’ tradition - and the new, more pluralistic, ‘political languages’, approaches which emerged from the late 1950s. Part two looks at the major strands of European political thought as represented by major books: Conservatism, (Edmund Burke, Reflections on the Revolution in France); Republicanism (Tom Paine, The Rights of Man); Socialism/Communism (Marx and Engels, The Communist Manifesto); Liberalism (John Stuart Mill, On Liberty) and Nationalism (extracts from Renan, Mazzini, Barker). The discussion concludes with consideration of the ‘end of ideology’ in the 1950s. Part three is student-led, each seminar participant presenting a work-in-progress paper on a topic of interest or relevance to her research and expertise.