Spring Courses 2008 Cúrsaí An Earraigh 2008

Beginning Irish I
IRST/IRLL 10101:01
Professor Hugh Fogarty
MWF 9:35-10:25
This course provides an enjoyable introduction to Modern Irish. Energetic teachers in small classes teach basic language skills, prepare students to conduct conversations and to read authentic texts. Extensive use is made of role-play and interactive teaching methods. Irish 10101 is a superb opportunity to learn a new language, explore Irish/Celtic culture and investigate the linguistic politics of the only minority language offered at Notre Dame. In addition to satisfying the College language requirement, Irish satisfies the popular Irish Studies Minor’s requirements and selected students will have an opportunity to study in Dublin, Ireland. No prior knowledge of the Irish Language required.
Beginning Irish I
IRST/IRLL 10101:02
Professor Peadar Ó Muircheartaigh
MWF 10:40-11:30
This course provides an enjoyable introduction to Modern Irish. Energetic teachers in small classes teach basic language skills, prepare students to conduct conversations and to read authentic texts. Extensive use is made of role-play and interactive teaching methods. Irish 10101 is a superb opportunity to learn a new language, explore Irish/Celtic culture and investigate the linguistic politics of the only minority language offered at Notre Dame. In addition Irish satisfies the College language and the popular Irish Studies Minor’s requirements. Selected students will have an opportunity to study in Dublin, Ireland. No prior knowledge of the Irish Language required.
Beginning Irish I
IRST/IRLL 10101:03
Professor Tomás Ó Murchú
MWF 12:50-1:40
This course provides an enjoyable introduction to Modern Irish. Energetic teachers in small classes teach basic language skills, prepare students to conduct conversations and to read authentic texts. Extensive use is made of role-play and interactive teaching methods. Irish 10101 is a superb opportunity to learn a new language, explore Irish/Celtic culture and investigate the linguistic politics of the only minority language offered at Notre Dame. In addition to satisfying the language requirement of the College of Arts and Letters, Irish satisfies the popular Irish Studies Minor’s requirements and selected students will have an opportunity to study in Dublin, Ireland. No prior knowledge of the Irish Language required.
Beginning Irish I
IRLL 10101:04
Professor Ciara Conneely
MWF 1:55-2:45
This course provides an enjoyable introduction to Modern Irish. Energetic teachers in small classes teach basic language skills, prepare students to conduct conversations and to read authentic texts. Extensive use is made of role-play and interactive teaching methods. Irish 10101 is a superb opportunity to learn a new language, explore Irish/Celtic culture and investigate the linguistic politics of the only minority language offered at Notre Dame. In addition to satisfying the language requirement of the College of Arts and Letters, Irish satisfies the popular Irish Studies Minor’s requirements and selected students will have an opportunity to study in Dublin, Ireland. No prior knowledge of the Irish Language required.
Beginning Irish II
IRST/IRLL 10102:01
Professor Tara MacLeod
MWF 9:35-10:25
A second semester of instruction in the Irish Language. This course is a continuation of IRST 10101 and further develops the students’ linguistic ability and knowledge of Irish. Role-play, pair work and group work, written exercise and dialogue are used to expand the student’s vocabulary, and cultivate a deeper understanding of the language. Students read basic texts and view a select number of authentic materials including some videos. Students are required to have passed Irish 101. In addition to satisfying the language requirement of the College of Arts and Letters, Irish satisfies the popular Irish Studies Minor’s requirements and selected students will have an opportunity to study in Dublin, Ireland.
Beginning Irish II
IRST/IRLL 10102:02
Professor Tara MacLeod
MWF 10:40-11:30
A second semester of instruction in the Irish Language. This course is a continuation of IRST 10101 and further develops the students’ linguistic ability and knowledge of Irish. Role-play, pair work and group work, written exercise and dialogue are used to expand the student’s vocabulary, and cultivate a deeper understanding of the language. Students read basic texts and view a select number of authentic materials including some videos. Students are required to have passed Irish 10101. In addition Irish satisfies the College language and the popular Irish Studies Minor’s requirements. Selected students will have an opportunity to study in Dublin, Ireland.
Intermediate Irish
IRST/IRLL 20103:01
Professor Sarah McKibben
MWF 9:35-10:25
This course follows on IRLL 10101 and 10102 with attention to more advanced grammatical structures, speaking and reading. You will hone your linguistic skills and also delve into some short twentieth-century texts in Irish. In addition, you will learn about Irish culture, music and participate in performances involving Irish. Prerequisites: you must have passed 10101 and 10102 to enroll.
Intermediate Irish
IRST/IRLL 20103:02
Professor Sarah McKibben
MWF 10:40-11:30
This course follows on IRLL 10101 and 10102 with attention to more advanced grammatical structures, speaking and reading. You will hone your linguistic skills and also delve into some short twentieth-century texts in Irish. In addition, you will learn about Irish culture, music and participate in performances involving Irish. Prerequisites: you must have passed 10101 and 10102 to enroll.
Celtic Heroic Literature IRST/IRLL 20109:01 Professor Hugh Fogarty MWF 11:45-12:35 An exciting introduction to Celtic literature and culture, this course introduces the thrilling sagas, breathtaking legends and prose tales of Ireland and Wales. Readings include battles, heroic deeds, feats of strength and daring and dilemma faced by the warrior heroes of the Celts. Celtic Heroic Literature, which requires no previous knowledge of Irish or Welsh, studies the ideology, belief system and concerns of the ancient Celtic peoples as reveled in their saga literature. By examining the hero’s function in society, students investigate the ideological concerns of a society undergoing profound social transformation and religious conversion to Christianity and the hero’s role as a conduit for emotional and social distress. Among the heroes to be studied in depth are: Cú Chulainn, Lug, St. Patrick and the king-heroes. Wisdom literature, archaeological and historical evidence will also be considered in this course. No prior knowledge of Irish required. All texts provided in English. Fulfills University Literature Requirement.
Advanced Readings in Irish Culture
IRST/IRLL 20203:01
Professor Peter McQuillan
TR 9:30-10:45
An advanced course focusing on reading and translating a variety of texts in the Irish language. We concentrate on further development of reading, interpretive, and technical skills mastered in previous language courses (IRLL 10101, IRLL 10102, IRLL 20101). Texts from various authors and historical periods allow students to taste different writing styles: contemporary fiction, journalism, literary criticism, historical and cultural texts. Emphasis will be on sentence structure, stylistics and syntax.Students are required to have earned a high grade in IRLL 20101 in order to take this class. At the conclusion of this course, students will be able to conduct independent research with Irish texts.
Modern British and Irish Literature
IRST 20520:01
Professor Sian White
TR 9:30-10:45
The twentieth century arrived to a world altered by industry and the metropolis, by scientific theory and psychoanalysis, by mechanical transportation and communication devices. Such a climate challenged traditional values, social mores, class distinctions, gender roles, and conceptions of nation, propriety and home. The literature from the first half of the century suggests that the increasingly alienating world forces interpersonal connection to take place under new circumstances, often outside of the traditional settings regulated by marital, social and religious convention. Through close reading, students in this course will examine how the literature presents colonialism, The Great War, the deterioration of aristocratic class values and privilege in both Britain and Ireland, the destruction of the metropolis and the home during the London air raids of World War II, and the shift in personal values vis-à-vis alcohol consumption and marital infidelity. The course will look at these modernist works in light not only of the alienating circumstances they represent, but also of the effect that alienation has on the interpersonal connections between individuals.
Irish and American Tap Dance
IRST 21601:01
Professor James McKenna
MW 4:30-5:45
This course will teach a range of fundamental steps.
The Hidden Ulster
IRST 30110:01
Professor Diarmaid Ó Doibhlin
TR 2:00-3:15
This course introduces students to the literature, language, culture and history of Ulster in Ireland and confronts the stereotypes of binary opposition that commonly mark the region. Through close textual readings of literary texts from the seventeenth century onwards, we discuss and interrogate the literary, religious, cultural and linguistic forces that shaped identity in Ulster from the colonial period onwards and explore the shared heritage of both communities -Irish/English, Catholic/Protestant, Native/Planter. This course will suit English majors and those interested in the study of identity formation and competing cultural ideologies. No prior knowledge of Irish is required for this course. All texts will be in translation.
Exile in the Irish Literary
IRST 30214:01
Professor Julieann Ulin
MW 3:00-4:15
This course is designed to meet the University’s literature requirement and will explore the centrality of emigration and immigration in the literary production of Irish fiction and drama by both writers in Ireland and abroad. The course will range from the nationalist movements of the early 20th century and their demand for a stop to emigration from Ireland to the early 21st century, which has seen a tremendous influx of immigrants, refugees and asylum seekers into Ireland. Special attention will be paid to the homeless Irish woman and the immigrant Irish woman, domestic violence, the concept of emigration as libratory or as exile, the problems of the returnee, and fantasies of gender and ethnic essentialism and of a threatened ‘authentic’ home and nation. The course will be reading-intensive, and will emphasize close reading skills, cultural analysis and historical contexts for each text. Students will write weekly short papers (3 pages) that perform literary analysis and incorporate historical readings and/or literary theory from library reserves. Course texts will include W. B. Yeats’s and Lady Gregrory’s Cathleen ni Houlihan, Joyce’s Dubliners, Brian Friel’s Philadelphia, Here I Come, Maeve Brennan’s The Rose Garden, Betty Smith’s A Tree Grows in Brooklyn, Eugene O’Neill, Long Day’s Journey Into Night, Edna O’Brien, Down by the River, Marina Carr’s By the Bog of Cats and Roddy Doyle’s The Woman Who Walked into Doors.
Victorian Irish Literature
IRST 30216:01
Professor Sean O’Brien
TR 9:30-10:45
The nineteenth century was a dynamic period for Ireland and writers from a many different backgrounds offer a range of perspectives on these changes. The central works of the class reflect diverse ideas on Irish and British history and literature and will provide a frame for debate and discussion of violence and social change, sexuality, economics, and politics during the Victorian period. Readings will include works from a variety of genres including: Somerville and Ross, Oscar Wilde, Robert Louis Stevenson, W.B. Yeats, Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, Matthew Arnold, and James Clarence Mangan. Course work will include several brief essays and a research paper.
Reading the Unwritten Story: Mother-Daughter Relationships in 20th c. Irish Fiction
IRST 30219:01
Abigail Palko
TR 2:00-3:15
While the role of father-son relationships (and their attendant conflict) in contemporary Irish literature has been well established, the Irish mother-daughter relationship is, as Anne Fogarty notes, “an unwritten story in Ireland” - not because it really is unwritten, but because it has not been well-charted in literary studies. The dilemmas that the family poses and that daughters face are fruitful topics for exploration; Declan Kiberd notes that “for some women writers the family was a trap, for others it remained a zone of resistance.” This course will engage in a chronological reading of twentieth century Irish women writers, tracing the developing mode(s) of representation employed to depict Irish maternity and analyzing their place in the Irish literary canon; it will also explore the relationships between these images and other pertinent themes, such as political and social issues,expressions of sexuality, the role of religion in Ireland, and images of nationhood. Authors to be read include Elizabeth Bowen, Maeve Brennan, Jennifer Johnston, Molly Keane, Mary Lavin, Dorothy Macardle, Edna O’Brien and Kate O’Brien. Course requirements include one-page response papers, 2 short papers and midterm/final exams.
Saints and Kings in Celtic Ireland
IRST/IRLL 30306:01
Professor Hugh Fogarty
MWF 2:00-2:50
TThis course focuses on a series of encounters (in early Irish and Hiberno-Latin) between saints and kings or other royal characters. Through these stories and characters, tensions between the domains of spiritual and secular, the local and the national, the native and the external, are raised, explored and (sometimes, though by no means always) resolved. Saints such as Patrick, Colmcille, Brigit, Ciarán, and Cainnech, together with kings such as Lóegaire Mac Néill, Diarmuit Mac Cerbaill, and Muirchertach Mac Erca will be studied.
Great Irish Writers
IRST 30309:01
Professor Peter McQuillan
TR 12:30-1:45
The early modern period (sixteenth to late-eighteenth centuries) is a time of English conquest in Ireland. It is therefore a period of cumulative crisis for the Irish and is important in the formation of their identity. We will read closely a selection of texts, both prose and poetry, representative of various facets of this crisis and of Irish responses to them. All texts, originally written in Irish, will be read in English translation. The material provides interesting contrasts and comparisons for those who have already studied some Anglo-Irish literature (we will in fact read some English writing on Ireland in this period) and it will also be of interest to students of Irish history. We will supplement the material with readings from the work of historians on early modern European nationalism in order to place it in its wider context. In addition, we will examine some recent work on the interface between language, literature and anthropology in order to deepen our cultural understanding of the texts we are studying.
Introduction to Irish Writers
IRST 30371:01
Professor Christopher Fox
MWF 10:40-11:30
As the visit to campus of the most recent Irish winner of the Nobel Prize in Literature suggests, this small island has produced a disproportionate number of great writers. Designed as a general literature course, the class will introduce the student to a broad range of Irish writers in English from the eighteenth century to the present. Writers will include Jonathan Swift, Maria Edgeworth, Oscar Wilde, James Joyce, William Butler Yeats, Elizabeth Bowen, Brian Friel, and John McGahern. We will also look at recent film versions of several of these writers’ works, including Wilde’s Importance of Being Earnest. Themes to be explored include representations of “national character” and the relationships between religion and national identity, gender and nationalism, Ireland and England, and “Irishness” and “Englishness.” Students can expect a midterm, a paper (5-6 pages typed) and a final.
Irish History Since 1800
IRST 30433:01
Professor James Smyth
MWF 10:40-11:30
This course consists of lectures and readings examining Irish (mainly) political history and Anglo-Irish relations from the Act of Union (1801) up to and including the Northern Ireland 'troubles' and the peace process. It focuses on religious conflict, catholic emancipation, famine, emigration, the development of romantic and revolutionary nationalism, unionism, rebellion, the changing nature of Anglo-Irish relations, modernization, and the special problems of the North. A mid-semester paper/essay and a final are required.
Late Medieval/Early Modern Ireland
IRST 30434:01
Professor Rory Rapple
TR 2:00-3:15
This course offers new perspectives on the struggle for mastery in Ireland from 1470 to 1660. Though keeping in mind the traditional view of the “English reconquest” (decades of rebellion, dispossession, and plantation until, in the aftermath of Cromwell, all Ireland was finally subjected to English rule) this course will take a different approach. By investigating a range of primary sources from the period, students will explore the interactions between the three different models of conquest: (1) descendants of the old Norman colonists (e.g., Fitzgeralds and Butlers) seeking to finish the job; (2) Tudor reform (inspired by Renaissance optimism), by which the English attempted to establish rule by means of legal, social, and cultural assimilation; and (3) unabashed exploitation by English private entrepreneurs on the make. The most important effect of these “contending conquests” was the way they shaped the diverse responses of the native Irish, ranging from accommodation and assimilation to outright rebellion and national war.
Debating Irish History
IRST 30439:01
Professor Rory Rapple
TR 5:00-6:15
There has long been disagreement between academic historians about how best to conceptualize Ireland’s troubled past. This course analyzes the approaches attempted in the nineteenth, twentieth and twenty first centuries to explain Ireland’s history and addresses a host of questions relevant to the history of any country. To what degree do influences like religious adherence, state loyalty and political commitment affect history writing? How can an historian best deal with the fact of human suffering? What is the difference between a terrorist and a freedom fighter? What effect do the constraints involved in the very process of writing history have on intelligent expression? Can a good history book ever be entirely satisfying to an ethnicity, a nation or a religious grouping?
The West of Ireland
IRST 40110:01
Professor Bríona Nic Dhiarmada
TR 3:30-4:45
This course will interrogate and examine representations of the West of Ireland in various twentieth century texts focusing, in particular on the role of ‘the West of Ireland’ in state formation and legitimization during the early decades of independent Ireland and its role in the construction of an Irish identity. We will look at how images of the West of Ireland were constructed in various utopian or romanticized formulations as well as examining more dystopian versions. This course will take an interdisciplinary approach, drawing on the visual arts and film as well as on literary texts in both Irish and English. (Irish language texts will be read in translation).
Beckett, Theater and Visual Art
IRST 40302:01
Professor David Lloyd
TR 11:00-12:15
In this course we will read and watch Samuel Beckett’s plays, read some of his art criticism and view work by artists he admired--where possible, we will seek out paintings by these artists in the L.A. area. As a dramatist, Beckett makes extensive use of painterly effects, both in stage design and in direction. We will be able to watch both TV productions of plays like Krapp’s Last Tape, Not I and Eh Joe that Beckett himself closely supervised, and the newly completed film versions of his plays (including Waiting for Godot, Endgame, and Happy Days) by directors that range from Neil Jordan and Atom Egoyan to Damien Hirst and David Mamet. Artists we will look at will include the Irish painter Jack B. Yeats (brother of W.B. Yeats), Bram Van Velde, the Dutch abstract painter, and Avigdor Arikha, the Israeli figurative painter and close friend of the writer from the late 1950s. We will, accordingly, read Beckett as dramatist in the context of the visual arts and their influence on his work, and learn to read visual material--painting, film, plays. We will try to understand Beckett both in the context of Irish drama and art (reading a little of the drama of Synge and W.B. Yeats) and in the context of the international avant-garde of which he was part. The dramas and visual material will be supplemented by a small number of critical works that will aid students in understanding Beckett’s works. Students will be expected to do response papers and one longer research paper.
Gender and Identity in Irish
IRST 40320:01
Professor Bríona Nic Dhiarmada
TR 12:30-1:45
This course will interrogate issues of gender and identity in the work of contemporary Irish language writers. We will examine the ways in which contemporary writers in Irish writing from a constellation of identities, sexual, cultural and linguistic question explore these issues as they articulate them in specific cultural forms. Drawing on recent theoretical work in gender studies and postcolonial studies the course will look at texts which question and problematize essentialist notions of cultural identity. It will explore in particular some of the tensions inherent in the articulation of a cross-cultural sexual identity and the specificity of linguistic and cultural inheritance in contemporary writing in Irish. We will read, among others, texts from writers such as Máire Mhac an tSaoi, Biddy Jenkinson, Nuala Ní Dhomhnaill, Pearse Hutchinson, Cathal Ó Searcaigh, Seán Mac Mathúna and Micheál Ó Conghaile.
Film, Literature and Irish Culture
IRST 40605:01
Professor Luke Gibbons
TR 11:00-12:15
This course will examine some of the dominant images of Ireland in film and literature, and will place their development in a wider cultural and historical context. Comparisons between film, literature and other cultural forms will be featured throughout the course, and key stereotypes relating to gender, class and nation will be analyzed, particularly as they bear on images of romantic Ireland and modernity, landscape, the city, religion, violence, family and community. Particular attention will be paid to key figures such as Yeats, Synge, and Joyce, and contemporary writers such as John McGahern, William Trevor, Patrick McCabe and Roddy Doyle will be discussed in terms of the wider implications of their work for contemporary Irish culture. The resurgence of Irish cinema and new forms of Irish writing in the past two decades will provide the main focus of the second part of the semester, tracing the emergence of new distinctive voices and images in an increasingly globalised and multi-cultural Ireland. Students are also required to register for IRST 41606:01, Lab: Irish Film and Culture. T 6:30-9:00 pm.
Ulysses, Cultural Studies
IRST 60305:01
(Graduate Course)
Professor David Lloyd
R 6:30-9:00 pm
The course is organized around a semester long reading of James Joyce’s Ulysses. Our first objective will be to read and comprehend and enjoy this work collectively; and all participants will be required, formally and informally, to contribute to our reading. Using Ulysses as our principal referent point, we will then be working through a number of key texts in the following areas: Joyce criticism, cultural studies and postcolonialism. This is intended to be an introduction to these bodies of work, not an exhaustive survey or even representative sampling. We will, accordingly, be reading these texts with constant reference to the ways in which they illuminate Ulysses and, beyond it, the colonial and postcolonial culture of Ireland. Towards the end of semester we will concentrate on discussing both the value of the different kinds of approaches we have encountered and tried to deploy and the ways in which methods we have used here might be applicable in other domains of cultural and literary studies. Since this is a research seminar, students will be expected to follow up their readings and deepen their knowledge of at least one of the domains of secondary material we have addressed (e.g., psychoanalysis, popular culture, postcolonialism etc.) and write a paper using this material to read a chapter or a thematic concern of Ulysses.
Gender and Identity in Irish
IRST 60312:01
(Graduate Course)
Professor Bríona Nic Dhiarmada
TR 12:30-1:45
This course will interrogate issues of gender and identity in the work of contemporary Irish language writers. We will examine the ways in which contemporary writers in Irish writing from a constellation of identities, sexual, cultural and linguistic question explore these issues as they articulate them in specific cultural forms. Drawing on recent theoretical work in gender studies and postcolonial studies the course will look at texts which question and problematize essentialist notions of cultural identity. It will explore in particular some of the tensions inherent in the articulation of a cross-cultural sexual identity and the specificity of linguistic and cultural inheritance in contemporary writing in Irish. We will read, among others, texts from writers such as Máire Mhac an tSaoi, Biddy Jenkinson, Nuala Ní Dhomhnaill, Pearse Hutchinson, Cathal Ó Searcaigh, Seán Mac Mathúna and Micheál Ó Conghaile.