Spring Courses 2009 Cúrsaí An Earraigh 2009

Beginning Irish I
IRST 10101:01
Professor Tara MacLeod
MWF 10:40-11:30,T 9:30-10:20
No prior knowledge of the Irish language required. This course provides an enjoyable introduction to modern Irish. Energetic teachers in small classes teach basic language skills and prepare students to conduct conversations and read authentic texts. Extensive use is made of role-play and interactive teaching methods. Irish 10101 is a superb opportunity to learn a new language, explore Irish/Celtic culture, and investigate the linguistic politics of the only minority language offered at Notre Dame. In addition to satisfying the language requirement of the College of Arts and Letters and the College of Science, Irish satisfies the popular Irish Studies minor's requirements, and selected students will have an opportunity to study in Dublin, Ireland.
Beginning Irish I
IRST/IRLL 10101:02
Professor Tara MacLeod
MWF 11:45-12:35, T 11:00-11:50
No prior knowledge of the Irish language required. This course provides an enjoyable introduction to modern Irish. Energetic teachers in small classes teach basic language skills and prepare students to conduct conversations and read authentic texts. Extensive use is made of role-play and interactive teaching methods. Irish 10101 is a superb opportunity to learn a new language, explore Irish/Celtic culture, and investigate the linguistic politics of the only minority language offered at Notre Dame. In addition to satisfying the language requirement of the College of Arts and Letters and the College of Science, Irish satisfies the popular Irish Studies minor's requirements, and selected students will have an opportunity to study in Dublin, Ireland.
Beginning Irish II
IRST/IRLL 10201:01
Professor Mary O’Callaghan
MWF 11:45-12:35, R 9:30-10:20
A second semester of instruction in the Irish Language. This course is a continuation of IRST 10101 and further develops the students’ linguistic ability and knowledge of Irish. Role-play, pair work and group work, written exercise and dialogue are used to expand the student’s vocabulary, and cultivate a deeper understanding of the language. Students read basic texts and view a select number of authentic materials including some videos. Students are required to have passed Irish 101. In addition to satisfying the language requirement of the College of Arts and Letters, Irish satisfies the popular Irish Studies Minor’s requirements and selected students will have an opportunity to study in Dublin, Ireland.
Beginning Irish II
IRLL 10102:02
Professor Mary O’Callaghan
MWF 10:40-11:30, T 11:00-11:50
A second semester of instruction in the Irish Language. This course is a continuation of IRST 10101 and further develops the students’ linguistic ability and knowledge of Irish. Role-play, pair work and group work, written exercise and dialogue are used to expand the student’s vocabulary, and cultivate a deeper understanding of the language. Students read basic texts and view a select number of authentic materials including some videos. Students are required to have passed Irish 101. In addition to satisfying the language requirement of the College of Arts and Letters, Irish satisfies the popular Irish Studies Minor’s requirements and selected students will have an opportunity to study in Dublin, Ireland.
Intermediate Irish
IRST 20103:01
Professor Anne Corbett
MWF 10:40-11:30
Continuation of the study of the Irish language with increased emphasis on the ability to read 20th-century literary work in the original Irish.
Celtic Heroic Literature
IRST 20109:01
Professor Hugh Fogarty
TR 9:30-10:45
An exciting introduction to Celtic literature and culture, this course introduces the thrilling sagas, breathtaking legends and prose tales of Ireland and Wales. Readings include battles, heroic deeds, feats of strength and daring and dilemma faced by the warrior heroes of the Celts. Celtic Heroic Literature, which requires no previous knowledge of Irish or Welsh, studies the ideology, belief system and concerns of the ancient Celtic peoples as reveled in their saga literature. By examining the hero’s function in society, students investigate the ideological concerns of a society undergoing profound social transformation and religious conversion to Christianity and the hero’s role as a conduit for emotional and social distress. Among the heroes to be studied in depth are: Cu Chulainn, Lug, St. Patrick and the king-heroes. Wisdom literature, archaeological and historical evidence will also be considered in this course. No prior knowledge of Irish required. All texts provided in English.
Advanced Readings in Irish Culture
IRST 20203:01
Professor Brian Ó Conchubhair
MWF 9:35-10:20
An advanced course focusing on reading and translating a variety of texts in the Irish language. We concentrate on further development of reading, interpretive, and technical skills mastered in previous language courses (IRLL 10101, IRLL 10102, IRLL 20103). Texts from various authors and historical periods allow students to taste different writing styles: contemporary fiction, journalism, literary criticism, historical and cultural texts. Emphasis will be on sentence structure, stylistics and syntax. Students are required to have earned a high grade in IRLL 20103 in order to take this class. At the conclusion of this course, students will be able to conduct independent research with Irish texts.
British and Irish Gothic
TR 3:30-4:45
Professor Heather Edwards
Although the Gothic is most often associated with the Romantic period, the Victorian period was marked by a revival in interest in Gothic themes and literary strategies. This course explores how Victorian writers refashioned the Gothic to reflect the anxieties of their own period, creating in particular distinct domestic and urban versions of the Gothic. Texts will include Emily Bronte’s “Wuthering Heights”, Joseph Sheridan Le Fanu’s “Carmilla”, Mary Elizabeth Braddon’s “Lady Audley’s Secret”, Bram Stoker’s “Dracula”, Robert Louis Stevenson’s “Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde”, and Oscar Wilde’s “The Portrait of Dorian Gray” among others. Students will become familiar with Gothic influences in the art and architecture of the period.
Irish and American Tap Dance
IRST 21601:01
Professor James McKenna
MW 4:30-5:45
This course will teach a range of fundamental steps.
Irish Folk Custom and Belief
IRST 30105:01
Professor Jeremiah Gillan
TR 12:30-1:45
‘Irish Folk Custom and Belief’ is both the title of a popular work from 1967 by Seán Ó Súilleabháin (1903-1996), archivist of the Irish Folklore Commission, and an approach to the study of rural Irish popular religion. That approach was long dominant among Irish folklorists. It tended to frame rural popular religion a historically and to fudge the issue of its relationship to specific social groups. At the same time it led to the recording of extraordinarily rich data, mostly from the Irish-speaking population of the West. Concentrating on the work of 19th century antiquarians and 20th century folklorists and anthropologists, the course will examine the study of rural popular religion in Ireland. It will contextualize it both in terms of historical, sociological and anthropological knowledge of Irish rural society and specifically of Irish peasant society, and in terms of the scientific study of religion. Specific topics often identified under the headings of ‘folk custom and belief’ will be discussed, in particular ritual, festival, magic, supernatural beings, sacred places and the oral narratives that deal with them. Specific scholarly texts, including texts by leading contemporary scholars of Irish rural popular religion, will be discussed as well as ethnographic texts recorded by the Irish Folklore Commission.
Migration and Identity in the New Ireland
IRST 30109:01
Professor Sean O’Brien
TR 11:00-12:15
In less than two decades, the Republic of Ireland has shifted from a relatively poor country with a high level of national, racial, and ethnic homogeneity to a country with the world’s fourth highest per capita income experiencing an exponential expansion of cultural diversity. One of the names used to describe this shift is “New Ireland,” and this course will discuss the cultural dimensions of this term. We will examine selections from contemporary Irish literature and film which contribute to this analysis and contextualize our discussions with legal, political, and economic approaches to Irish social issues. Class work will include several short papers, a long research paper, and an exam.
Violence in Late Medieval and Renaissance Europe
IRST 30274:01
Professor Rory Rapple
TR 3:30-4:45
During the late-medieval and early-modern period Western Europe was a particularly violent place, but Europeans did not conceive of themselves as living in a state of unmitigated and continuous chaos. This course will examine the ways in which violence manifested itself during the period, with particular attention to the theoretical justifications that underpinned it, the rituals that surrounded it and the calculation with which it was used. The centrality of violence in upholding personal honour as well as the persistent notions that its employment lay at the heart of government and the legal system will also be scrutinized. The benediction that the cult of the knight as Christian professional gave to much violence, and the opportunities for financial advancement that mercy could offer those capable of devastating action will be of special interest. Using contemporary accounts the course will bring the student from the streets of sixteenth century Rome to the fields of war-torn France, from the western seaboard of Ireland to the contested waters of the Mediterranean in a world where life was often cheap and mercy was generally expensive.
Introduction to Irish Writers
IRST 30372:01
Professor Brian Ó Conchubhair
MW 11:45-12:35
This course introduces undergraduate students to Irish literature, explores its dominant themes and motifs and surveys canonical texts and major authors from the 18th century to the present day. A broad range of texts and genres - poetry, novels, short stories, folklore and drama - are studied from a historical and cultural perspective and in relation to transnational literary trends and movements. Attention is also paid to modernization and tradition as well as post-colonialism, feminism and censorship. No prior knowledge of Ireland or the Irish language is required. Irish-language texts will be available. Students are also required to register for IRLL 32109 (section 01, 02 or 03), Discussion: Introduction to Irish Writers.
British History, 1660-1800
IRST 30413:01
Professor James Smyth
MWF 9:35-10:25
This course of lectures and readings concentrates on British (that is, Scottish as well as English) history from the restoration of monarchy in 1660 to the great crisis detonated by the French Revolution and war in the 1790s. Themes include the politics of Protestant dissent, political ideologies, the role of parliament, Jacobitism, and the rise of the radical parliamentary reform movement.
Late Medieval/Early Modern Ireland
IRST 30434:01
Professor Rory Rapple
TR 12:30-1:45
This course offers new perspectives on the struggle for mastery in Ireland from 1470 to 1660. Though keeping in mind the traditional view of the “English reconquest” (decades of rebellion, dispossession, and plantation until, in the aftermath of Cromwell, all Ireland was finally subjected to English rule) this course will take a different approach. By investigating a range of primary sources from the period, students will explore the interactions between the three different models of conquest: (1) descendants of the old Norman colonists (e.g., Fitzgeralds and Butlers) seeking to finish the job; (2) Tudor reform (inspired by Renaissance optimism), by which the English attempted to establish rule by means of legal, social, and cultural assimilation; and (3) unabashed exploitation by English private entrepreneurs on the make. The most important effect of these “contending conquests” was the way they shaped the diverse responses of the native Irish, ranging from accommodation and assimilation to outright rebellion and national war.
Irish-American History
IRST 30610:01
Professor Patrick Griffin
MW 11:45-12:35
This course will explore the Irish-American experience from Atlantic, global, and comparative perspectives. We will, of course, cover traditional topics, such as labor, politics, and religion. And we will encounter many colorful characters and fascinating stories. But we will do so by viewing the Irish who came to America as part of a broader, dynamic diaspora that would span the globe. Viewing migration to the American colonies (including the Caribbean) and the United States from this vantage point means that we must consider the changing relationship between Ireland and America, as well as the ways in which both regions were parts of broader economic and cultural systems. As such, we will examine dynamics that occurred within the Atlantic basin, such as movement and adaptation to a New World, within a global context. Needless to say, we will cover the history of both sending and receiving societies in rigorous fashion. Only by doing this sort of work can we understand what defined the Irish-American experience.
Folklore, Literature and Irish National Culture
IRST 40316:01
Professor Diarmuid Ó Giolláin
TR 9:30-10:45
The ideological character of the 19th century concept of folklore allowed it to transcend the social category of peasants from whom it was largely recorded. This course will look at the role of folklore in the building of an Irish national culture from the time of the Gaelic Revival. Programmatic texts in Irish and in English by Douglas Hyde, first president of the Gaelic League, and by Séamus Delargy, director of the Irish Folklore Commission, will be discussed. It will also look at a later polemical text of the Gaelic writer Máirtín Ó Cadhain directed at what he perceived as the essentialism of Irish folklorists.
Contemporary British and Irish Fiction
IRST 40515:01
Professor Mary Smyth
MW 11:45-1:00
This course will introduce students to the contemporary fiction of Ireland, England, Scotland and Wales, as well as some of the best recent Black British fiction. Some of the authors whose work we will read are: Pat McCabe, Neil Jordan, John Banville, Zadie Smith, Monica Ali, Andrea Levi, Irvine Welsh, James Kelman and Pat Barker. These writers will be read in the context of `the Break-up of Britain’ and a concomitant sense of the changes in British and Irish identity in the past twenty years or so. Expect a lot of reading; but also some superb novels. Two twelve-page papers and a presentation.
Film, Literature and Irish Culture
IRST 40605:01
Professor Luke Gibbons
TR 11:00-12:15
This course will examine some of the dominant images of Ireland in film and literature, and will place their development in a wider cultural and historical context. Comparisons between film, literature and other cultural forms will be featured throughout the course, and key stereotypes relating to gender, class and nation will be analyzed, particularly as they bear on images of romantic Ireland and modernity, landscape, the city, religion, violence, family and community. Particular attention will be paid to key figures such as Yeats, Synge, and Joyce, and contemporary writers such as John McGahern, William Trevor, Patrick McCabe and Roddy Doyle will be discussed in terms of the wider implications of their work for contemporary Irish culture. The resurgence of Irish cinema and new forms of Irish writing in the past two decades will provide the main focus of the second part of the semester, tracing the emergence of new distinctive voices and images in an increasingly globalised and multi-cultural Ireland. Students are also required to register for IRST 41606:01, Lab: Film, Literature and Irish Culture.
Folklore, Literature and Irish National Culture
IRST 50316
Professor Diarmuid Ó Giolláin
TR 9:30-10:45
The ideological character of the 19th century concept of folklore allowed it to transcend the social category of peasants from whom it was largely recorded. This course will look at the role of folklore in the building of an Irish national culture from the time of the Gaelic Revival. Programmatic texts in Irish and in English by Douglas Hyde, first president of the Gaelic League, and by Séamus Delargy, director of the Irish Folklore Commission, will be discussed. It will also look at a later polemical text of the Gaelic writer Máirtín Ó Cadhain directed at what he perceived as the essentialism of Irish folklorists.
The Feminine in Irish Literary and Oral-Vernacular Tradition
IRST 50318:01
Professor Gearóid Ó Crualaoich
TR 3:30-4:45
This course addresses issues concerning the representation of the feminine in Irish literary and oral-vernacular tradition. It treats of the historical displacement and re-interpretation of the figure of the autonomous ‘otherworld’ female in literature and oral narrative. In particular it examines a series of texts from pre-modern oral narrative tradition featuring the figures of ‘cailleach’/hag and ‘bean feasa’/wise woman with a view to understanding their significance for the ‘native’ ear. The potential significance of such texts as therapeutic resources for the modern reader is also considered?
The Feminine in Irish Literary and Oral-Vernacular Tradition
IRST 60318:01
Professor Gearóid Ó Crualaoich
TR 3:30-4:45
This course addresses issues concerning the representation of the feminine in Irish literary and oral-vernacular tradition. It treats of the historical displacement and re-interpretation of the figure of the autonomous ‘otherworld’ female in literature and oral narrative. In particular it examines a series of texts from pre-modern oral narrative tradition featuring the figures of ‘cailleach’/hag and ‘bean feasa’/wise woman with a view to understanding their significance for the ‘native’ ear. The potential significance of such texts as therapeutic resources for the modern reader is also considered?