Spring Courses 2010 Cúrsaí An Earraigh 2010

Beginning Irish I
IRST 10101:01
Tara MacLeod
MWF 10:40-11:30, T 9:30-10:20

No prior knowledge of the Irish language required. This course provides an enjoyable introduction to modern Irish. Energetic teachers in small classes teach basic language skills and prepare students to conduct conversations and read authentic texts. Extensive use is made of role-play and interactive teaching methods. Irish 10101 is a superb opportunity to learn a new language, explore Irish/Celtic culture, and investigate the linguistic politics of the only minority language offered at Notre Dame. In addition to satisfying the language requirement of the College of Arts and Letters and the College of Science, Irish satisfies the popular Irish Studies minor's requirements, and selected students will have an opportunity to study in Dublin, Ireland.

Beginning Irish I
IRST 10101:02
Muiris Ó Meara
MWF 11:45-12:35, T 11:00-11:50

No prior knowledge of the Irish language required. This course provides an enjoyable introduction to modern Irish. Energetic teachers in small classes teach basic language skills and prepare students to conduct conversations and read authentic texts. Extensive use is made of role-play and interactive teaching methods. Irish 10101 is a superb opportunity to learn a new language, explore Irish/Celtic culture, and investigate the linguistic politics of the only minority language offered at Notre Dame. In addition to satisfying the language requirement of the College of Arts and Letters and the College of Science, Irish satisfies the popular Irish Studies minor's requirements, and selected students will have an opportunity to study in Dublin, Ireland.

Beginning Irish I
IRST 10101:03
Verona O’Driscoll
MWF 1:55-2:45, R 2:00-2:50

No prior knowledge of the Irish language required. This course provides an enjoyable introduction to modern Irish. Energetic teachers in small classes teach basic language skills and prepare students to conduct conversations and read authentic texts. Extensive use is made of role-play and interactive teaching methods. Irish 10101 is a superb opportunity to learn a new language, explore Irish/Celtic culture, and investigate the linguistic politics of the only minority language offered at Notre Dame. In addition to satisfying the language requirement of the College of Arts and Letters and the College of Science, Irish satisfies the popular Irish Studies minor's requirements, and selected students will have an opportunity to study in Dublin, Ireland.

Beginning Irish II
IRST/IRLL 10201:01
Gráinne Ní Mhuirí
MWF 11:45-12:35, R 9:30-10:20

A second semester of instruction in the Irish Language. More emphasis will be placed on reading simple texts in Irish.

Beginning Irish II
IRLL 10102:02
Muiris Ó Meara
MWF 10:40-11:30, R 11:00-11:50

A second semester of instruction in the Irish Language. More emphasis will be placed on reading simple texts in Irish.

Intermediate Irish
IRST 20103:01
Sarah McKibben
MWF 9:35-10:25

Continuation of the study of the Irish Language with increased emphasis on the ability to read 20th-century literary work in the original Irish.

The Irish Novel and Memoir
IRST 20111:01
Brian Ó Conchubhair
TR 2:00-3:15

This undergraduate course offers an introduction to the Irish language novel for non-literature majors and those interested in Irish history and culture. In this we study the late emergence of the genre during the Irish language revival, its subsequent growth and development throughout the twentieth century and conclude with a survey of the current state of the contemporary novel. Among the authors to be read in this class are Rev. Peadar Ó Laoghaire, Rev. Pádraig Standún, Rev. Pádraig Ua Duinnín, Pádraic Ó Conaire, Dónall Mac Amhlaigh, Breandán O hEithir, Myles na Gopaleen, Máirtín O Cadhain, Eilís Ni Dhuibhne, Alan Titley and others. All texts will be read in translation or viewed as DVDs. Minors in IRLL will have an opportunity to read addition text in the original for extra credit.

Advanced Readings in Irish Culture
IRST 20203:01
Brian Ó Conchubhair
TR 9:30-10:45

An advanced course focusing on reading and translating a variety of texts in the Irish language. We concentrate on further development of reading, interpretive, and technical skills mastered in previous language courses (IRLL 10101, IRLL 10102, IRLL 20103). Texts from various authors and historical periods allow students to taste different writing styles: contemporary fiction, journalism, literary criticism, historical and cultural texts. Emphasis will be on sentence structure, stylistics and syntax. Students are required to have earned a high grade in IRLL 20103 in order to take this class. At the conclusion of this course, students will be able to conduct independent research with Irish texts.

Irish and American Tap Dance
IRST 21601:01
James McKenna
MW 4:30-5:45

This course will teach a range of fundamental steps.

Poetry in Irish Since the Revival
IRST 30112:01
Sarah McKibben
MWF 10:40-11:30

This course will examine the compelling poetry produced in Irish since the Gaelic Revival of the turn of the twentieth century running right up to very recent publications of the first decade of the twenty-first century. We will consider major authors whose influence on the tradition has been profound, more recent international stars, as well as emergent figures whose work is only very recently in print. Our method will be that sine qua non of literary study, close reading, the dogged and unsparing analysis of the inner workings of the text at hand, an enduring and essential skill for both scholars of liberal arts and the educated, thinking individual more generally. To this will we join attention to the sociocultural, linguistic and political context of the works, relating to the aftermath of Irish independence, economic hardship and emigration, the crisis of the Catholic church, transformations in gender and familial expectations, the Troubles in the North, and the new composition of Irish society with immigration and globalization. Poetry as well as selected criticism will be read in English.

Great Irish Writers
IRST 303081:01
Peter McQuillan
TR 12:30-1:45

The objective of this course is to offer an introduction to a representative cross-section of literature in Irish from approximately 800 down to the present day. We will examine the great Irish medieval epic, the Táin Bó Cúailnge (“The Cattle Raid of Cooley”) which recollects a pre-medieval heroic society but which uses the lineaments of that society to tackle social and political issues current in the Middle Ages in Ireland. Then we will look at the poetic tradition in Irish between approximately 1600 and 1900, an era when England, later Britain, consolidates its conquest and colonization of the country. Much of the poetry is to be read against the background of disruption and dislocation caused by the political turmoil of these centuries. Finally, we will consider some more contemporary writing in Irish from 1900 to the present: the novel, the short story as well as poetry. All materials will be read in English translation.

Screening the Irish Troubles
IRST 30320:01
Bríona Nic Dhiarmada
TR 11:00-12:15

This course will look at how political conflict in Ireland from the 1916 Rebellion and the War of Independence up to and including what became known as “The Troubles” in the North of Ireland has been represented on the screen. Students will analyze a wide variety of cinematic texts, mainstream commercial Hollywood features as well as independent Irish and British films. Documentary film will also be analyzed. Certain seminal events such as Bloody Sunday and the 1981 Hunger Strikes which have a diverse representational history on screen will be given particular attention. Among the films discussed will be Mise Eire, Saoirse, Michael Collins, The Wind that Shakes the Barley, Some Mother’s Son, In the Name of the Father, and Bloody Sunday.

Introduction to Irish Writers
IRST 30371:01
Christopher Fox
MWF 10:40-11:30

As the visit to campus of the most recent Irish winner of the Nobel Prize in Literature suggests, this small island has produced a disproportionate number of great writers. Designed as a general literature course, the class will introduce the student to a broad range of Irish writers in English from the eighteenth century to the present. Writers will include Jonathan Swift, Maria Edgeworth, Oscar Wilde, James Joyce, William Butler Yeats, Brian Friel, and John McGahern. We will also look at recent film versions of several of these writers’ works, including Wilde’s Importance of Being Earnest. Themes to be explored include representations of “national character” and the relationships between religion and national identity, gender and nationalism, Ireland and England, and “Irishness” and “Englishness.” Students can expect a midterm, a paper (5-6 pages typed) and a final.

Introduction to Irish Studies
IRST 303756:01
Sean O’Brien
MWF 12:50-1:40

This course will provide an outline of the field of Irish studies. We will look Ireland its internal and external relations through an interdisciplinary lens that connects literary, sociological, political, historical, and economic perspectives. We explore several key elements of the study of Ireland using critical scholarship, archival information, and a range of creative works including films (from The Quiet Man to Once), literature (from Bram Stoker and Oscar Wilde to Nuala Ní Dhomhnaill and Seamus Heaney), and music (from 18th-century harpist Turlough Carolan to U2 and Dropkick Murphys). This course is open to students at every level and there are no prerequisites for this class other than an interest in Ireland and the Irish. While this is an introductory class, the interdisciplinary focus will also benefit students who have studied Ireland in other courses. requirements will include brief response papers, a midterm and final exam.

Irish Politics-1916-2009: From Colonialism to the Celtic Tiger and Beyond
IRST 30423:01
Sean McGraw
MW 8:00-9:15

Ireland, a country rich in history, has undergone dramatic changes in the twentieth century beginning with its fight for independence and culminating in its meteoric rise during the Celtic Tiger years. What explains Ireland's distinctive political trajectory and how does it compare to other European nations? How should we understand the Celtic Tiger, the rapid series of social, economic and political transformations that have occurred within Ireland since the 1990s? This course explores these questions by studying the political actors and institutional settings of Irish politics, the nature of political influence and the shaping of political priorities, and the forces that shape policy outcomes. It will address such critical issues as the legacies of colonialism and civil war, nationalism, democratization, the relationship between the Church and State, the Northern Ireland Troubles and the European Union. While the course focuses on the Republic of Ireland, it will adopt a broad comparative perspective, situating the country both within the wider global context and within the political science literature.

Early Modern Ireland
IRST 30434:01
Rory Rapple
TR 11:00-12:15

This course offers new perspectives on the struggle for mastery in Ireland from 1470 to 1660. Though keeping in mind the traditional view of the “English reconquest” (decades of rebellion, dispossession, and plantation until, in the aftermath of Cromwell, all Ireland was finally subjected to English rule) this course will take a different approach. By investigating a range of primary sources from the period, students will explore the interactions between the three different models of conquest: (1) descendants of the old Norman colonists (e.g., Fitzgeralds and Butlers) seeking to finish the job; (2) Tudor reform (inspired by Renaissance optimism), by which the English attempted to establish rule by means of legal, social, and cultural assimilation; and (3) unabashed exploitation by English private entrepreneurs on the make. The most important effect of these “contending conquests” was the way they shaped the diverse responses of the native Irish, ranging from accommodation and assimilation to outright rebellion and national war.

Irish History Since 1800
IRST 30436:01
James Smyth
MWF 9:35-10:25

This course will consist of lectures and readings examining Irish political history and Anglo-Irish relations from 1801 up to and including the current conflict in Northern Ireland. Attention will be given to religious conflict, the development of romantic and revolutionary nationalism, the changing nature of Anglo-Irish relations, and the special problems of the North. A mid-semester examination, a paper/essay, and a final will be required.

Issues in Modern Irish History
IRST 30448:01
Melinda Grimsley-Smith
MW 11:45-1:00

What is special about Irish Catholicism? Was pre-Famine Irish poverty a myth perpetuated by tourists from other countries? Why was celibacy so common in Ireland? Why was schizophrenia called “The Irish Disease”? If you’re in Belfast in July, why should you do all your shopping well before and after the 12th? We will explore these and other questions in modern Irish history, as well as themes such as nationalism, education and the Irish language, women and the family, sexuality, health and disease, and emigration. Students will have the opportunity to develop a solid understanding of both long-term trends and specific issues in modern Ireland, as well as the ability to evaluate primary documents and secondary works. Assignments include regular short (1-2p) response papers, from which students will choose one theme or subject to explore in greater detail in a longer (7-10p) research paper.

Irish-American History
IRST 30610:01
Patrick Griffin
MWF 10:40-11:30

This course will explore the Irish-American experience from Atlantic, global, and comparative perspectives. We will, of course, cover traditional topics, such as labor, politics, and religion. And we will encounter many colorful characters and fascinating stories. But we will do so by viewing the Irish who came to America as part of a broader, dynamic diaspora that would span the globe. Viewing migration to the American colonies (including the Caribbean) and the United States from this vantage point means that we must consider the changing relationship between Ireland and America, as well as the ways in which both regions were parts of broader economic and cultural systems. As such, we will examine dynamics that occurred within the Atlantic basin, such as movement and adaptation to a New World, within a global context. Needless to say, we will cover the history of both sending and receiving societies in rigorous fashion. Only by doing this sort of work can we understand what defined the Irish-American experience.

Culture and Politics of Northern Ireland
IRST 405130
Mary Smyth
TR 11:00-12:15

This course explores the politics of culture, and the cultures of politics, in the North of Ireland during the twentieth century. Using a multiplicity of genres - drama, fiction, poetry, film, painting, and documentary material - we will unravel the history behind partition, the causes of the Troubles, and the nature of the conflict. Among the key moments or events upon which we will concentrate are the Somme, the sinking of the Titanic, Bloody Sunday, the hunger strikes, Drumcree, the Anglo-Irish Agreement, and the Shankill Butchers. Certain key themes will stretch through our semester’s work. Among these are sectarianism, the relationship between violence and culture, the role of religion in the state, borders, hatred, identity, and issues of social and political justice. Some of the writers whose work we will read are Seamus Heaney, Frank McGuinness, Sam Thompson, John Montague, Seamus Deane, Eoin MacNamee, Robert MacLiam Wilson, Colin McCann, and Thomas Kinsella.