What I'm thinking about...


Spanish adoption of the TDI diesel engine after VW invents it in 1989 (dark bar). This is a common trend across Europe. Almost all diesel cars are produced by European auto makers.


 

The above figure shows the EU chose emissions standards to decrease CO and CO2 (i.e., greenhouse) emissions, while the US chose standards to decrease NOx emissions. Diesels produce little CO and CO2 but a lot of NOx. In "Innovation, Emissions Policy, and Competitive Advantage in the Diffusion of European Diesel Automobiles" we show the pro-diesel emissions policy employed by the EU benefited domestic automakers and amounted to a significant (strategic?) non-tariff trade policy.

Working Papers

1. Naive Policy Design and Legislative Inertia in the Regulation of Alcohol
(with Eugenio Miravete and Katja Seim)
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Revision Submitted to Econometrica

2. Innovation, Emissions Policy, and Competitive Advantage in the Diffusion of European Diesel Automobiles
(with Eugenio Miravete and Maria J. Moral)
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3. Complexity, Efficiency, and Fairness of Multi-Product Monopoly Pricing
(with Eugenio Miravete and Katja Seim)
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4. Rules versus Discretion in the Protection of Intellectual Property
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5. The Effects of Coordinating National Patent Policies
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Works in Progress

Innovation and Imitation of a General Technology: The Case of European Diesel Automobiles

Innovation, Imitation, and Outsourcing in the U.S. Semiconductor Industry

Does Maritime Shipping Provide Equal Access to Global Markets?
(with Simeon Alder)