Graduate Level Theology Course Descriptions

Fall 2004

 

Tentative

Subject to Change

Updated: 5/24/2004

Theo

Course

Instructor

Call #

Location

500

MTS Colloquium

Matthew Ashley

1576

DeBartolo 320

Credit

Time

Area

Graded

Level

0.0

W 4:30-5:45

MTS only

SU

Graduate

Description: Required for all M.A. & M.T.S. students

 

Theo

Course

Instructor

Call #

Location

500C

Faith and Traditions

John Conley, C.S.C. & Nicholas Ayo, C.S.C.

1322

Moreau

Credit

Time

Area

Graded

Level

3.0

F 9:30-12:00

Candidates Only

Letter

Graduate

Description: Required for non-degree seeking seminarians only.

 

Theo.

Course

Instructor

Call #

Location

503A

Introduction to Hebrew Bible

Eugene Ulrich

0093

Malloy 320

Credit

Time

Area

Graded

Level

3.0

T H 8:00-9:15

BS

Letter

Graduate

Description: This course provides an overview and critical study of the Hebrew Bible in its literary, historical, and theological contexts. The focus will be principally on reading and gaining an informed understanding of the biblical text, but this will be done against the background of the history, literature, and religions of the magnificent civilizations in the ancient Near East.  Further aspects include analysis and use of the tools of historical-critical scholarship; ancient mythology; the processes by which the Scriptures were composed; Old Testament theology; and contemporary theological issues.   The course is designed to prepare students both for doctoral biblical studies and for intelligent effectiveness in the contemporary church.

 

There will be one class presentation, one exegesis paper, a mid-term, and a final exam.

 

Readings:

The Catholic Study Bible(NAB).

J. Mays (ed.), HarperCollinsBible Commentary.

D. Harrington, Interpreting the Old Testament.

N. Gottwald, The Hebrew Bible-A Socio-Literary Introduction.

 J. Walsh, The Mighty from Their Thrones.

B. Childs, Introduction to the Old Testament as Scripture.

 

Theo

Course

Instructor

Call #

Location

507A

307A

Elementary Hebrew I

Alison Schofield

4594

Main Bldg 303

Credit

Time

Area

Graded

Level

3.0

M W F 10:40-11:30

BS

Letter

Graduate

Description: This is a two-semester introductory course in biblical Hebrew;

under normal circumstances, the student must complete the first in order to

enroll in the second. The fall semester will be devoted to learning the grammar

of biblical Hebrew. The spring semester will include a completion of and review

of the grammar.  Also, the spring semester will see the introduction of Hebrew

texts from the Bible, in addition to texts from Qumran and/or Rabbinic

literature. The course will focus on developing reading and comprehension

skills in biblical Hebrew through the study of biblical texts.  In addition,

students will learn how to use reference grammars, concordances, and apparatus

to the Biblica Hebraica. The course encourages students to think about the

grammatical forms and their implications for biblical interpretation..

 

Theo

Course

Instructor

Call #

Location

507H

607H

Intermediate Hebrew

James VanderKam

4302

Flanner 824

Credit

Time

Area

Graded

Level

3.0

T H 3:45-5:00

BS

Letter

Graduate

Description: The course presupposes completion of one year of Elementary Hebrew and is designed to increase the student's knowledge of Hebrew through reading prose and poetic sections of the Bible and also through reading selections from post-biblical Hebrew literature such as the Dead Sea Scrolls and the Mishnah.

 

Theo

Course

Instructor

Call #

Location

508A

405A

Introduction to Christian Latin

D. Sheerin

4803

DeBartolo 207

Credit

Time

Area

Graded

Level

3.0

M T H F 8:30-9:20

 

Letter

Graduate

Description: N/A

 

Theo.

Course

Instructor

Call #

Location

511A

The Gospel of John

John Meier

5680

Cushing 205

Credit

Time

Area

Graded

Level

3.0

T H 2:00-3:15

 

Letter

Graduate

Description: The purpose of this lecture course is to introduce the student at the Master's level to present-day study of the Gospel of John.  The Gospel will be covered by the interaction between class lectures on specific disputed topics or pericopes on the one hand and the reading of a commentary on the Fourth Gospel on the other.  The major methods employed will be those of source, form, and redaction criticism, though recent literary theories will also be considered.  The emphasis in the lectures will be on a synthetic overview of the theology of John's Gospel, divided into major themes, rather than on an exegesis of the whole Gospel in order.  An overview of the whole Gospel in its final canonical order will be gained by weekly reading and discussion of a commentary on John's Gospel, periodic quizzes on the readings, and discussions following the quizzes.

 

Theo

Course

Instructor

Call #

Location

516

Sin & Forgiveness

in the Bible

Gary A. Anderson

0615

DeBartolo 231

Credit

Time

Area

Graded

Level

3.0

T H 12:30-1:45

 

Letter

Graduate

Description: This course will consist of a close reading of those central texts in the Old and New Testaments that treat the concept of sin.  The central themes to be encountered will be: the origin of human sin, its metaphysical nature (i.e. the metaphorical expressions used to speak of it), its consequences upon Israel and/or humanity at large and how it's disastrous effects on individual human persons or the larger society can be ameliorated or rectified.  Particular attention will be spent on how these texts have provided a framework for subsequent theological reflection in Judaism and Christianity.

 

Theo.

Course

Instructor

Call #

Location

521

Early Christianity: An Introduction

Robin Young

4467

Earth Science 102

Credit

Time

Area

Graded

Level

3.0

T H 11:00-12:15

HC

Letter

Graduate

Description: This course provides an introduction to the history and thought of the first five hundred years of the Christian church. The approach taken will be largely that of social history: we will try to discover not only the background and context of the major theological debates but also the shape and preoccupations of "ordinary" Christian life in late antiquity. Topics to be studies will therefore include canon formation, martyrdom, asceticism pilgrimage, and Jewish-Christian relations, as well as the doctrinal debates undergirding Gnosticism, Manichaeism, Donatism, Arianism, and Pelagianism. The class will stress the close reading of primary texts. Requirements include class participation, a final examination, the memorization of a few important dates and places, and 2 papers, one of which will be an exercise in the close reading of an additional primary source and the other and exploration of early Christian exegesis.

 

Theo.

Course

Instructor

Call #

Location

526B

Eucharist in the Middle Ages

Joseph Wawrykow

6386

DeBartolo 334

Credit

Time

Area

Graded

Level

3.0

M W 1:30-2:45

 

Letter

Graduate

Description: The eucharist stands at the heart of western European Christianity in the high middle ages. The insistence of church officials on regular reception of the eucharist; the numerous scholastic treatments of the theoretical issues associated with the eucharist; the recourse by spiritual authors, especially women, to the eucharist to express their most profound religious and devotional insights; the pointed reference to the Christ eucharistically-present to establish Christian identity and to distinguish the members of Christ from others, both within and outside of western Europe; the development of new rituals focused on aspects of the eucharist; the burgeoning of artistic representations of eucharistic themes-all testify to the centrality of the eucharist in medieval theological and religious consciousness. Through the close reading of representative texts by a wide variety of 13th-century authors, and, the study of the different kinds of 'eucharistic' art, this course examines the uses made of the eucharist by a broad spectrum of high medieval Christians. A special concern of the course is the relation between eucharistic doctrine and religious practice-to what extent have teachings about transubstantiation and real presence shaped religious expression? How has religious experience itself occasioned the refinement of these doctrines?

 

Theo

Course

Instructor

Call #

Location

528

441

Jews & Christians Throughout History

Michael Signer

4751

DeBartolo 131

Credit

Time

Area

Graded

Level

3.0

T H 3:30-4:45

 

Letter

Graduate

Description: In the closing days of the II Vatican Council Nostra Aetate (Declaration on non-Christian Religions) reversed the negative attitude of the Catholic Church toward Judaism and the Jewish people.  This remarkable change promoted "dialogue" with Jews, and suggested positive changes in the way Judaism was presented in Liturgy and Catechesis.  Reactions from the Jewish communities were diverse: from rejection to welcoming.

 

This course will explore a number of issues, which emerge, from the history of Christian thought and theology:  How did a negative image of Judaism develop within Christianity?  In what ways were these unfavorable teachings contribute toward violence against the Jews?  What is the relationship between Christian anti-Jewish teachings and Anti-Semitism?  Is there any correspondence to Christian hostility

within Judaism?  In what ways have Jewish authors reacted to Christian tradition?

 

We shall also analyze recent theological writings by Jews and Christians about the changed nature of their relationship.  How can Jews and Christians develop religious responses to modernity?  In what senses can a study of Judaism by Christians, or Christianity by Jews, help either community to understand itself better?  How can Christians and Jews develop a theology of "the other" which is not triumphalist but

empathic?

 

Students will be asked to keep a journal; write a term paper

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Theo

Course

Instructor

Call #

Location

530

Fundamentals Systematic Theology

Mary Doak

3323

Malloy 320

Credit

Time

Area

Graded

Level

3.0

T H 12:30-1:45

TS

Letter

Graduate

Description: This course is a graduate level introduction to the nature, tasks, and methods of Systematic Theology.  It will proceed through a focus on 20th century theological contributions to the doctrine of Revelation, with special attention being given to the sources and methods used by major theologians.  In addition to refining our understanding of the Christian doctrine of Revelation, this study should result in a clearer grasp of such basic theological topics as: the relation of faith and reason, the use of Scripture and Tradition as theological sources, the significance of contemporary experiences, and the theological importance of praxis.

 

Theo

Course

Instructor

Call #

Location

532

Christology

Robert Krieg

3322

DeBartolo 246

Credit

Time

Area

Graded

Level

3.0

T H 11:00-12:15

TS

Letter

Graduate

Description: This course examines four issues in contemporary Christology: the meaning of the doctrine of Chalcedon, the theological significance of the historical Jesus, the theological role of belief in the resurrection of Jesus Christ, and the understanding of Jesus Christ as redeemer.  It pursues these issues by studying the Christologies of Karl Rahner, Gerald O'Collins, Brian McDermott, and Jon Sobrino.  The course requires the writing of four essays based on the assigned texts, secondary literature, and lectures.         

 

Theo

Course

Instructor

Call #

Location

535B

Theology of Edward Schillebeeckx

Mary Catherine Hilkert

5683

Malloy 320

Credit

Time

Area

Graded

Level

3.0

T H 3:30-4:45

 

Letter

Graduate

Description: The theological project of Edward Schillebeeckx traces one trajectory in the development of Catholic theology in the 20th century. This course will explore the evolution in Schillebeeckx‚s thought from an early sacramental and dogmatic theology grounded in the thought of Thomas Aquinas, through the turn to history and eschatology in the mid 1960s, to his later focus on radical suffering (negative contrast experience) as the necessary starting point for contemporary theology. If numbers permit, the course will proceed as a seminar that will include background lectures and discussion based on a close reading of selected portions of major works including Revelation and Theology, Christ the Sacrament of the Encounter with God, God the Future of Man, Understanding of Faith, and the christological trilogy Jesus: An Experiment in Christology, Christ:The Experience of Jesus as Lord, and Church: The Human Story of God.

 

Course requirements: Required reading and seminar participation, mid-term and final essay examinations, and either a research paper or three integration papers based on course readings.

 

Theo

Course

Instructor

Call #

Location

536

Theology After Darwin

Matthew Ashley

5704

ROTC 116

Credit

Time

Area

Graded

Level

3.0

M W 11:45-1:00

 

Letter

Graduate

Description: Daniel Dennett, a philosopher at Tufts University, has argued that the modern theory of evolution has not only made it intellectually possible and satisfying to be an atheist, but mandatory.  What is the history of this anti-theistic use of Darwin, and how have Christian theologians responded?  This course offers an advanced survey of attempts by Christian theologians (both Protestant and Catholic) to come to grips with the challenges raised by the Darwinian revolution.  We will begin with an overview of the role of the so-called argument from design in eighteenth and nineteenth century Christian theology.  Then we will consider two paradigmatic late nineteenth-century reactions to Darwin:  that of Charles Hodge (What is Darwinism?) and of John Zahm, C.S.C. (Evolution and Dogma).  From there we will study the largely negative mood of the early twentieth century, with particular attention to the rise of creationism.  We will conclude by looking at three influential contemporary responses to Darwin:  the modified creationist attack on Darwinism represented by the so-called „intelligent designš argument; the use of Darwin to attack the coherence of Christian faith by figures such as Daniel Dennett and Richard Dawson; and the argument by John Haught and Denis Edwards (building on Teilhard de Chardin) that the Darwinian revolution can in fact support and enrich Christian faith and theology.

  This course will build on the study of Darwin done in HPS 569:  the Darwinian Revolution.  Students who have not had this course are welcome to take "Theology After Darwin," as long as they agree to do a modest amount of reading (three or four chapters) from The Cambridge Campanion to Darwin prior to the beginning of the course in August. 

 

Theo

Course

Instructor

Call #

Location

546A

479

Hindu & Christian Interaction

Brad Malkovsky

5893

O’Shag 115

Credit

Time

Area

Graded

Level

3.0

M W 1:30-2:45

 

Letter

Graduate

Description: N/A

 

Theo.

Course

Instructor

Call #

Location

551A

442E

Christian Ethics and Contemporary Culture

Gerald McKenny

5343

O’Shag 106

Credit

Time

Area

Graded

Level

3.0

M W 1:30-2:45

MT

Letter

Graduate

Description: Christian ethics is committed to the claim that God is the ultimate ground and source of ethics.  In the cultures of the modern West this claim has been repeatedly challenged.  Two of the major challenges hold that by virtue of its theocentrism Christian ethics is inimical to rational morality or is implicated in cruelty, suffering and evil.  This course addresses these two challenges through the reading of biblical texts with classical and modern commentaries, Aquinas, Scotus, Kant, Nietzsche, Dostoyevsky, Levinas, Jonas, Barth, John Paul II and others.

 

Theo

Course

Instructor

Call #

Location

554

Christian Ethics & Pastoral Practice

Paulinus Odozor

3260

Hayes-Healy 129

Credit

Time

Area

Graded

Level

3.0

T H 3:30-4:45

 

Letter

Graduate

Description: Faith in Jesus Christ as Lord and savior has practical implications for the way believers construe the world and organize their lives.  What these implications are for Christian life in some specific areas of life and the tensions, which arise from the attempt of the Christian community to remain faithful to the teachings of the Lord Jesus while trying to live a fully human life – this is at the core of our course.

 

Therefore, in this course, we will (a) study the ethical stance of the Christian (Catholic) community on a number of issues and the pastoral issues arising from the position of this community on these issues; (b) explore the ways the pastoral worker can help to effectively translate Church teaching and moral theology in these areas; (c) Look at the moral demands that arise form the exercise of any pastoral ministry in the Church today.

 

Our course is divided into three main sections.  The first section will look at questions pertaining to human sexuality and Christian marriage.  Section two focuses on ethical issues of life and death while section three will look at the ethics of ministry and pastoral care.

 

Theo

Course

Instructor

Call #

Location

560

Liturgical History

Maxwell Johnson

4040

O’Shag 208

Credit

Time

Area

Graded

Level

3.0

M W 10:15-11:30

LS

Letter

Graduate

Description: Survey of liturgical history and sources with regard to both Eastern and Western rites.  Fundamental liturgical sources including basic homiletic and catechetical documents of the patristic period.  Basic introduction to the methodology of liturgical study.  Requirements include seminar-style presentations on select sources and two take-home examinations.

 

Theo

Course

Instructor

Call #

Location

562

Eucharist

Michael S. Driscoll

1454

DeBartolo 231

Credit

Time

Area

Graded

Level

3.0

T H 12:30-1:45

LS

Letter

Graduate

Description: The Church makes the Eucharist and the Eucharist makes the Church. A biblical, historical, systematic and liturgical treatment of the Eucharistic liturgy with a special emphasis on pastoral considerations. The goal of this course is a comprehensive understanding of the nature and development of the Christian Eucharist. In order to accomplish this end an examination of both the structure and the content of the eucharistic liturgy will be undertaken. A positive theological method will be employed whereby the Eucharist will be studied from an historical perspective, after which a systematic theological reflection upon various aspects will be undertaken with a commentary on contemporary theory and practice.

 

Theo

Course

Instructor

Call #

Location

572

Ritual Studies

John Melloh

2144

Malloy 320

Credit

Time

Area

Graded

Level

3.0

M W 3:00-4:15

LS

Letter

Graduate

Description: The pastoral liturgist is one who fosters critical praxis in the liturgical life of a local church. This course is designed to introduce students to ritual studies through a treatment of ritual, symbol, language, myth and story, time and space, music and art. Students will discuss and employ a method for analysis of worship events. (Fall)

 

Theo

Course

Instructor

Call #

Location

575O

American & Catholic: Religion and Culture Tension

Jay Dolan

6394

Online

Credit

Time

Area

Graded

Level

3.0

Online

MA only

Letter

Graduate

Description:

 

Theo

Course

Instructor

Call #

Location

576

Fundamentals of Pastoral Care

Dominic Vachon

 

 

Credit

Time

Area

Graded

Level

1.0

M 3:00-4:15

1st year MDIV

SU

Graduate

Description: Self-assessment of skills for ministry.

 

Theo

Course

Instructor

Call #

Location

581

Images and Models of Ministry I

Michael Connors

6581

Malloy 220

Credit

Time

Area

Graded

Level

2.0

W 3:00-4:30

MDIV

S U

Graduate

Description: Through supervision and seminars, the tools of field education will be developed. Focus will be on diagnosing skills, clarifying goals, concretizing objectives, identifying methods of learning, and understanding the theology implied therein. Students are required to keep a ministry journal, write a contract, a critical incident, 2-page reflection paper on readings, end of the semester evaluation of field placement.  1st year Mdiv students only. (Fall)      

 

Theo

Course

Instructor

Call #

Location

583

Articulating Faith I

Janice Poorman

3764

Malloy 320

Credit

Time

Area

Graded

Level

2.0

W 10:00-11:30

MDIV

S U

Graduate

Description: In conjunction with supervised ministerial placements, students examine operative ecclesiologies, pastoral strategies and practical theologies of ministry.  2nd year Mdiv students only.  (Fall)       

 

Theo

Course

Instructor

Call #

Location

585

Leadership and Authority

Janice Poorman

6582

Malloy 320

Credit

Time

Area

Graded

Level

2.0

M 10:00-11:30

MDIV

S U

Graduate

Description: Description: Through supervised field experience and seminars, students treat issues inherent in their exercise of authority. In particular students analyze the theology displayed by their actions. Students are required to write a contract, case study, 2-page book review, weekly journal and end of year report of field placement. Course requirements include four to six hours weekly at field placement site, journal, etc. as above, weekly supervisory sessions of 30 minutes, attendance at weekly field education seminars and three interviews with instructor.   3rd year Mdiv students only.  (Fall)

 

Theo

Course

Instructor

Call #

Location

591

Cannon Law

Patricia Smith

3766

DeBartolo 245

Credit

Time

Area

Graded

Level

3.0

M W 3:00-4:15

MDIV

Letter

Graduate

Description: The purpose of this course is to provide students studying for ministry with an introduction to the law of the Roman Catholic Church. General principles for the interpretation of canon law as well as its history, and its relationship to theology and pastoral praxis are discussed. Although attention is given the laws and canonical jurisprudence concerning marriage, other selected canonical topics of value to those in ministry are considered as well. (Fall) – Mdiv students only            

 

Theo

Course

Instructor

Call #

Location

592A

Liturgical Celebration and Ministry I

John Melloh

2181

Performing Arts B042

Credit

Time

Area

Graded

Level

2.0

T 9:00-11:30

MDIV

Letter

Graduate

Description: A study of the structure of the Eucharistic Rite and the Liturgy of the Hours with emphasis on ministerial roles.   (Fall)

 

Theo

Course

Instructor

Call #

Location

593A

Preaching I

Craig Satterlee

1582

Security 228

Credit

Time

Area

Graded

Level

2.0

F 8:00-12:00

MDIV

Letter

Graduate

Description: This course is an introduction to homiletics. (Fall)

 

Theo

Course

Instructor

Call #

Location

593B

Preaching II

John Melloh

3321

Malloy 220

Credit

Time

Area

Graded

Level

2.0

H 9:00-11:30

MDIV

Letter

Graduate

Description: A continuation of Preaching I, this course treats exegesis for preaching, methods of homily preparation and delivery.   (Fall)

 

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