Alan Seabaugh
seabaugh.1@nd.edu
Vita pdf download

Alan Seabaugh is a Professor of Electrical Engineering at the University of Notre Dame and Director of the SRC-STARnet Center for Low Energy Systems Technology (LEAST). He received the Ph.D. degree in electrical engineering from the University of Virginia, Charlottesville, in 1985. Before joining the faculty at Notre Dame he held research positions at the National Bureau of Standards (1979 to 1986), Texas Instruments (1986 to 1997), and Raytheon (1997 to 1999). He has authored or coauthored more than 300 papers and given 90 invited presentations at conferences and workshops; he has 22 U.S. patents and 10 foreign patents and is an editor for the IEEE Transactions on Electron Devices. He received teaching awards in 1990 from U.T. Dallas and 2001 from Notre Dame. He was elected Senior Fellow at Raytheon in 1999 and IEEE Fellow in 2003. He received the Int. Symp. on Comp. Semicon. Quantum Devices Award in 2011 for seminal contributions and leadership in semiconductor devices and circuits based on quantum mechanical tunneling. His current research interests are in nanoelectronic devices and circuits, III-V and graphene tunnel field-effect transistors, and Li-ion batteries.

 

Seabaugh photo

   

Group News

Trond Ytterdal is at Notre Dame for four weeks to work with the LEAST research team on implementing the TFET model as a native model in AIM-Spice and designing/testing digital and analog circuits using the TFET model. Dr. Ytterdal is a professor in the department of electronics and telecommunications at the Norwegian University of Science and Technology-Trondheim. (July 2014)

Sara Fathipour presented her research on "Investigation of aging and restoration of polyethylene-oxide cesiumperchlorate solid polymer electrolyte used for ion doping of a WSe2 field-effect transistor" at the Device Research Conference poster session in Santa Barbara. (June 2014)

Buchanan Bourdon (Notre Dame) and Patrick Foley (University College Cork, Ireland) were awarded NDnano Undergraduate Research Fellowships to work with Dr. Seabaugh's group this summer. Buchanan is continuing his work on simulating ion-electron transport using COMSOL Multiphysics software; Patrick's research is focused on the automation of testing devices on wafers using a Cascade auto-prober, in conjunction with two software programs: Nucleus and Wavevue. (May 2014)

Hao Lu's paper on "Tunnel Field Effect Transistors: State of the Art" was published in the Journal of the Electron Devices Society. (May 2014)

Hao Lu received her master’s degree in electrical engineering and is continuing her research on TFET compact modeling and 2D graphene ionic memory to complete her Ph.D. (May 2014)

Tim Vasen has successfully defended his doctoral dissertation on "Investigation of III-V tunneling field-effect transistors." He has returned to Lund University in Sweden, where he is employed as a principal engineer. (April 2014)

Hao Lu presented her work on "Continuous semiempirical model for the current–voltage characteristics of tunnel FETs" at the 2014 Ultimate Integration on Silicon (ULIS) conference in Stockholm, Sweden. (April 2014)

Huamin Li has joined the LEAST research team at Notre Dame and is focused on the development of low-voltage steep-subthreshold-swing transistors. Huamin was previously a postdoc at the Advanced Institute of Nano Technology at Sungkyunkwan University in Seoul, Korea. (April 2014)

Qin Zhang has completed her postdoc assignment with NIST/MIND and is now working with the Information Engineering Department at the University of Pisa in Italy (April 2013).

The LEAST Center Steep transistor group at Notre Dame welcomes Dr. Shudong Xiao from the University of Maryland. As a postdoc with LEAST, Shudong is working on tunnel FETs based on stacked 2D crystals (April 2013).

 

 

Buchanan Bourdon
bbourdon@nd.edu

Buchanan is a rising sophomore at the University of Notre Dame and is a recipient of the 2013 NDnanoUndergraduate Research Fellowship. He is researching the development of low-voltage nanoionic memory devices using two-dimensional materials such as graphene and molybdenum disulphide. Buchanan plans to major in computer engineering and hopes to one day achieve his Ph.D. in computer engineering as well. His other interests include golf, physics, and competitive bass fishing.

 

Bourdon photo

Sara Fathipour
sfathipo@nd.edu

Sara received her B.Sc. degree in electrical engineering from University of Tehran, Iran in 2012. She is now the PhD student in the department of electrical engineering at University of Notre Dame. She is very much interested in nanoelectronics, tunneling transistors, III-V and graphene based devices and energy harvesting devices.

Fathipour photo

Huamin Li
hli10@nd.edu

Hua-Min is a postdoctoral research associate in the Center of Low Energy Systems Technology (LEAST). He received his Ph.D. degree in Nano Science and Technology from Sungkyunkwan University, Korea in 2013. His research interests include solid-state electronic and optoelectronic devices based on Si and 2D layered materials such as graphene, boron nitride, and transition metal dichalcogenides. Currently he is working on tunneling transistor using 2D layered materials.

Hao Lu photo

Hao Lu
hlu1@nd.edu

Hao received her bachelor's degree in microelectronics from Peking University in 2011. She is now a graduate student in the department of electrical engineering at the University of Notre Dame. Her research interests are the development and architecture of Li-ion graphene flash memory, and modeling of steep-slope devices. She also enjoys yoga, cooking, and traveling in her free time.

Hao Lu photo

Research collaborations

Suman Datta (Penn State)

Patrick Fay (Notre Dame)

Susan Fullerton (Notre Dame)

Debdeep Jena (Notre Dame)

Gerhard Klimeck (Purdue)

Theresa Mayer (Penn State)

Maja Remskar (Jožef Stefan Institute)

Robert Wallace (University of Texas at Dallas)

Mark Wistey (Notre Dame)

Huili Grace Xing (Notre Dame)

 

Seabaugh Group Alumni

Group photo summer 2011

 

07.17.14