Workshop Dates: May 20-21, 2007

The Workshop consists of a series of tutorial lectures when experts of their field present a detailed review of their research. The presentations will be in an accessible level to graduate students. Specific techniques and methodologies for networks research will be explained. These include graph analysis techniques, numerical and analytical methods, visualization software, statistics and network sampling methods, as well as domain specific detail about the particular fields (such as gene transcription, protein binding, flux-balance analysis, transport equations, etc.).

Workshop Program

   
SUNDAY 20
 
   
7:30-9:00
BREAKFAST
8:00-9:00
8:45-OPENING
9:00-10:00
10:00-10:15
COFFEE BREAK
10:15-11:15
11:15-11:30
11:30-11:45
11:45-12:00
12:00-12:15
12:15-2:00
LUNCH
2:00-2:15
2:15-2:30
2:30-2:45
2:45-3:00
3:00-3:15
3:15-3:30
3:30-3:45
3:45-4:00
4:00-4:15
COFFEE BREAK
4:15-4:30
4:30-4:45
4:45-5:00
5:00-5:15
5:15-5:30
 
   
MONDAY 21
 
   
7:30-8:00
BREAKFAST
8:00-9:00
9:00-10:00
10:00-10:15
COFFEE BREAK
10:15-11:15
11:15-12:15
12:15-2:00
LUNCH
2:00-3:00
3:00-3:15
3:15-3:30
3:30-3:45
3:45-4:00
4:00-4:15
COFFEE BREAK
4:15-4:30
4:30-4:45
4:45-5:00
5:00-5:15
5:15-5:30
5:30-5:45
5:45-6:00


Legend:
Tutorial lectures are 60 min = 45 min + 15 min questions;
Contributed talks are 15 minutes = 12 min + 3 min questions

 

Barabási, Albert-László (University of Notre Dame) Mon. 10:15 - 11:15 m4a m4v

Title: 
From Random to Scale Free Networks
Abstract: 
The purpose of this tutorial will be to discuss the basic features of scale-free networks, from empirical data to growth models and consequences.

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Caldarelli, Guido (Università "La Sapienza", Rome) Sun. 9:00 - 10:00 ppt pdf m4a m4v

Title: 
Community and Clustering in some Social Networks
Abstract: 
In this talk, we will present the basic methods for the analysis of the clustering and the detection of communities in networks. We also present an application of these methods to the case of a word association network and to the case of wikipedia.

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Contractor, Noshir (University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign) Mon. 2:00 - 3:00 ppt pdf m4a m4v

Title: 
Multi-Theoretical Multilevel (MTML) Models to Study the Emergence of Networks
Abstract: 
The changes looming in the organizational landscape signal the need for a new generation of organizational theory and research that responds to the assumptions, aspirations, and adversities that will characterize these 21st century organizational forms. While there has been a long-standing interest in the study of organizations from a social network perspective the fundamental changes outlined above suggest that the research agenda needs to evolve from studying networks in (or between) organizations to grapple with the notion that the network is the organization. This nuanced, yet significant, change in perspective has substantial -- and substantive -- implications for the deployment of a comprehensive network analytic framework to specify and statistically model the structural tendencies of network forms on the bases of multiple theories and at multiple levels of analyses (Contractor, Wasserman, & Faust, 2006; Monge & Contractor, 2003). Towards that goal, this tutorial begins by reviewing some of the theoretical and methodological accomplishments and challenges of contemporary research on networks. Next the tutorial offers an analytic framework that can be used to specify and statistically test simultaneously multilevel multi-theoretical hypotheses about the structural tendencies of networks. The tutorial concludes with an empirical study that illustrates some of the capabilities of this framework.

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Dunne, Jennifer A. (Santa Fe Institute) Mon. 8:00-9:00 m4a m4v

Title: 
An overview of food-web structure and dynamics
Abstract: 
Ecologists have a long history of studying food webs, the networks of feeding relationships among species, as demonstrated by the work of Charles Elton in the 1920's. The current focus on integrated empiricism, analysis and modeling was kick-started by mathematical analyses of community stability published by Robert May in 1973. In this tutorial, I will discuss the history of food-web concepts and research, current key topics with an emphasis on the structure and dynamics of complex food webs, and how such work fits within the broader framework of network research.

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Korniss, György (Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute) Mon. 11:15 - 12:15 pdf m4a m4v

Title: 
Prototypical Synchronization and Transport Problems in Weighted Complex Networks
Abstract: 
First, I will discuss the simplest synchronization paradigm in a noisy environment, the Edwards-Wilkinson process on an arbitrary network. I will specifically consider the problem of optimizing synchronization in weighted complex networks with fixed total edge cost. Then, employing recent connections between the Edwards-Wilkinson process and resistor networks, and some well-known connections between random walks and resistor networks, I will also pursue a naturally related problem of optimizing performance in queue-limited communication networks utilizing local weighted random "routing" schemes. I will discuss two methods for studying the above problems: exact numerical diagonalization and mean-field approximation on uncorrelated network, http://arxiv.org/abs/cond-mat/0609098.

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Maslov, Sergei (Brookhaven National Lab) Mon. 9:00-10:00 ppt pdf m4a m4v

Title: 
Genome-wide protein binding networks: from topology to kinetics
Abstract: 
In the first part of my talk I will describe the common topological properties of genome-wide protein binding networks such as their broad degree distribution, a particular set of degree-degree correlations, and a heavily interconnected "small-world" topology. Then I will introduce and compare different models proposed to account for their appearance: 1) The evolutionary explanation using growth models in which the network grows y duplication of individual genes 2) The biophysical explanation based on a broad distribution of "stickiness" of individual proteins. 3) The functional explanation: there are just as many binding partners of a given protein as needed for its function and these functional requirements are very heterogeneous. In the second part of my talk I will go beyond pure topological description and look at the Law of Mass Action (LMA) equilibrium of reversible protein binding networks and the kinetics of its response to perturbations in abundances of individual proteins. I will demonstrate that the extent of changes in free and bound concentrations of both immediate and more distant neighbors of a perturbed protein is influenced by such factors as the network topology, the distribution of protein abundances among its nodes, and the average binding strength.

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Toroczkai, Zoltán (University of Notre Dame) Mon. 10:15-11:15 ppt m4a m4v

Title: 
Gradient Networks
Abstract: 
A will briefly introduce the notion of gradient networks and discuss its implications on the collective efficiency of social networks in competitive environments.

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Last Updated May 3, 2007 | Site Design by Elisha Hardy