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The Thirteenth Link: The Fragmented Web

 

One June 26, 2000 President Clinton, with J. Craig Venter, left, and Francis Collins, announces completion of "the first survey of the entire human genome."

(from http://www.the-scientist.com/images/yr2000/jul24/ap_clinton.jpg)

 

Human Genome Project

 

(from http://www.ornl.gov/TechResources/Human_Genome/home.html)

 

 

glass_charac.gif

 

Networks in the cell appear at many levels. They include protein-protein interaction networks (red-lines), protein-gene intereactions (green-lines) and metabolic networks (bottom). They together form what is often called the "cellular network."

 

 

 

The topology of the metabolic network of the yeast cell.

(from http://www.nd.edu/~networks/cell/)

 

 

 

  

Zoltan N. Oltvai,
Assistant Professor of Pathology at Northwestern University, who is interested in the topology of complex biological networks.

(from http://www.nums.nwu.edu/~igp/facindex/OltvaiZ.html)

 

The WIT (What is There?) database, and extensive depository of  metabolic networks.

(from http://wit.mcs.anl.gov/WIT2/)
 

 

 

The 2000 Nature paper demonstrating that the metabolism of 43 organisms is scale-free.

 

(from http://www.nd.edu/~networks/cell/papers/metabolic.pdf)

 

Andreas Wagner and David Fell, who independenly concluded that the metabolic network of E. Coli is scale-free.

 

(from http://bms-mudshark.brookes.ac.uk/fell.html)

 

 

The protein-protein interaction network of yeast also has a scale-free topology: a few proteins interact with a large number of other proteins, while most proteins have only one or two links.

 

(from H. Jeong et al Nature 411, 41 (2001)).

 

A microarray chip can record which of the genes are active in a cell-offering unprecedented opportunities as a future diagnostic tool.

For a description of how the DNA chip works, see
http://www.devicelink.com/ivdt/archive/98/09/009.html

(from http://asip.uthscsa.edu/ANNMEET_COURSE/images/microarray-medium.jpeg)

 

 

P53 Networks,

Vogelsteing, Lane and Levine suggested in a Nature paper that the best way to understand cancer, and the role of the p53 molecule, is to assume that the p53 molecule is a hub in the p53 network.

(from Nature 408, 307 (2000)).

 

Bert Vogelstein,

Investigator,
The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine

(from http://www.hhmi.org/research/investigators/vogelstein.html)
 

 

 

Sir David Lane,

Professor,
Department of Surgery and Molecular Oncology,
Ninewells Hospital and Medical School,
Dundee.

 (from http://www.dundee.ac.uk/biochemistry/dpl.htm)

Arnold J. Levine,

Robert and Harriet Heilbrunn Professor
Rockefeller University

(from http://www.rockefeller.edu/labheads/levine/arnoldlevine.html)
 

 

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Copyright (c) 2002 Albert-Laszlo Barabasi All rights reserved.
alb@nd.edu