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CATHOLIC SOCIAL TRADITION CONFERENCE

Peace Yesterday, Today, and Tomorrow

CELEBRATING 50 YEARS SINCE PACEM IN TERRIS

March 21–23, 2013    University of Notre Dame

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Colloquium and Workshop Presenters 

In Presentation Order

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Friday | March 22 | 10:30 AM

Colloquium Sessions on Social Issues I:

Four Concurrent Presentations of Papers 

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Peace in an International Setting | Room 100–104

 

Episcopal Conferences of the Developing World’s Peace and Justice Efforts

Dr. Terence McGoldrick
Theology Department
Providence College

Description of Presentation: An important way that the Church has been meeting the human rights and peace objectives of Pacem in Terris is in the activism of its Episcopal Conferences around the world. The bishops of the developing world are meeting social justice issues in their lands on many fronts and creating permanent offices for coordinated national efforts. Policy statements and plenary assemblies still have their role, but they are making fewer statements than in the past and relying more on grassroots initiatives and programs. To give examples of these initiatives the paper looks at three representative cases; Kenya, Mexico, and India. In Kenya the Church was an active participant in writing the country’s new Constitution, as a means to address the ominous African social tensions of tribalism and corruption. Today’s Conferencia Episcopal Mexicana is attempting to rise to the national crisis of a vicious drug war, which they blame on a fundamental culture of violence and corruption and which they are actively combatting with a national education and evangelization effort. They are using both statements and a national campaign in attempt to restore the social fabric and value of human life, in what they consider the most violent society in today’s world. Lastly, India’s Episcopal Conference affords an example of the new emphasis on activism, when they confront the problem of healthcare. Regionally, the FABC’s recent statements on evangelization are noteworthy developments of Asia’s triple dialogue and “new way of being Church.” The paper will conclude drawing some implications of the local Church’s vital role in bringing about the vision of Pacem in Terris today, as witnessed in these three vibrant regions of the Catholic world.

Bio: Dr. Terence McGoldrick is a moral theologian with the faculty of Providence College. His area of specialty is Catholic Social Thought, spirituality and Global Catholicism. His STL and STD were completed at Fribourg University, Switzerland, where he was a Swiss National Fund scholar and assistant director of the Centre International de Doctrine Social Chrétien. In that capacity he collaborated in an interdisciplinary research, which catalogued every Episcopal Conference statement worldwide from Rerum Novarum to 1991. He has published on Francis de Sales, the soul and neuroscience and on Catholic Social Thought as it is being applied around the world. He and his wife Theresa have three children.

 

Om Shanti, Shanti: The Catholic Church of India a Catalyst for Peace in a Pluralistic Society

Basilio G. Monteiro, Ph.D.
Associate Professor and Chair of the Division of Mass Communication
Director of Graduate Program in International Communication
St. John’s University

Description of Presentation: This paper explores how the tiny Catholic population of India engages in a ministry of presence in the highly pluralistic society, which serves as catalyst for peace in their respective communities, and in the country as a whole, albeit occasional outbursts of ethnic/religious violence.

Bio: Basilio G. Monteiro, Ph.D. specializes in International Communication, Communication and Theology, Media Strategies and Peace Building. He is currently associate professor and chair of the Division of Mass Communication, and director of Graduate Program in International Communication.

 

Communities Affected by War (Case Studies) | Room 202

 

“Mujeres de la Guerra”: Illuminating the Luchas and Gendered Experiences of Salvadoran Women of War in Light of Pacem in Terris

Karen Ross, M.A.
Ph.D. Candidate in Theology and Ethics
Loyola University Chicago

Description of Presentation: Mujeres de La Guerra: Illuminating the Luchas and Gendered Experiences of Salvadoran Women of War in Light of Pacem in Terris seeks to uncover the specific gendered experiences that women faced during the Salvadoran Civil war, and use Pacem in Terris as a useful tool in illuminating their often silenced voices. By addressing and recognizing the luchas (struggles) faced by women involved in war, a more holistic sense of peace and justice can be achieved in the post-war peacemaking process.

Bio: Karen Ross is in the Integrated Studies in Ethics and Theology Doctoral Program at Loyola University Chicago, specializing in feminist and sexual ethics, as well as liberation theology in Latin America. She received her undergraduate degree and master's degree from the University of Dayton. She leads a young adult delegation to El Sitio, El Salvador each summer through her home parish, St. Catherine of Siena in Kalamazoo, Mich.

 

Economic Justice and the Demands of Peace-Building: Transformation of the Israeli–Palestinian Conflict in the Light of Pacem in Terris (1963) and Gaudium et Spes (1965)


Edward Gaffney
Professor of Law and Religion
Valparaiso University

Description of Presentation: Both Pacem in Terris and Gaudium et Spes—the Pastoral Constitution of Vatican II on the Church on the Modern World—address the connection between economic development and the task of peacebuilding. Both documents urge the avoidance of armed conflict and specifically prohibit acts of war aimed indiscriminate at civilian population centers. Both teach that peace is not the absence of conflict, but the presence of justice, which includes the human and communal development referred to above. This paper explores the urgency of a global initiative to resolve the on-going scandal of the longest raging conflict in the modern world. Specifically, it will discuss the connection between relevant principles of Pacem in Terris (esp. ¶¶ 100-125) and Gaudium et Spes (esp. ¶¶ 4,6,8-10,22,29,63-72,77-82) and numerous economic and political initiatives relating to the genuine human needs of both Israelis and Palestinians. It scrutinizes major efforts at peace-making in the light of these documents, discussing ways in which principles articulated in Pacem in Terris and Gaudium et Spes explain both why many efforts at a peace “process” have been fruitless and why the contending parties must face the burden of transforming their nasty, brutish, and long violence into a mutually satisfactory relationship containing seeds of hope for transforming the entire region culturally and economically.

Bio: Ed Gaffney studied theology at the Gregorian University and the Pontifical Biblical Institute in Rome, and law and theology at the Catholic University of America in Washington. He served as a translator (Latin-English) for guests of the Secretariat for Christian Unity at the third and fourth sessions of Vatican II (1964 & 1965), and conducted several published interviews with observers and theological periti (experts) at the Council. He also served on the staff of the Bishops’ Committee on Ecumenical and Interreligious Affairs, and is the co-author with Judge John T. Noonan, Jr., of Religious Freedom (a collection of materials on the history of the struggle for religious freedom) and has authored dozens of briefs in leading cases involving these issues in federal and state courts. He was a columnist for Commonweal and a founding editor of the Journal of Law and Religion. He is the producer-director-writer of Holy Land: Common Ground (a documentary on Israeli and Palestinian peace-builders) and Empty Boxcars (a documentary on mass murder and mass rescue of Jews in the Shoah in Bulgaria). His current projects are “War and Peace” (materials on history, moral reasoning and international law on the misuse of force) and “The Stranger and the Neighbor” (biblical stories of hospitality).

 

Education and Technology | Room 112–114

 

Educating for Peace and Justice Among the ‘Nones:’ Pedagogical Resources for the Twenty-first Century from the Catholic Peace Movement in the Era of Pacem in Terris

Nicholas Rademacher, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor of Religious Studies
Cabrini College

Description of Presentation: This paper offers an overview of a pedagogical practice that seeks to engage college students of various backgrounds in interfaith dialogue and cooperation for peace and justice within the framework of the Catholic Social Tradition. This practice has been designed with the “nones” in mind, those students who arrive on college campuses with little religious literacy and nominal religious affiliation. Emphasis is placed on the interpretation and practice of two themes that are addressed in Pacem in Terris, the primacy of conscience and cooperation with all people of good will. In this approach, Thomas Merton and Daniel Berrigan serve as exemplars who, in the era of Pacem in Terris, recognized the importance of deep personal reflection on the demands of conscience and, from that reflection, practiced interfaith dialogue and cooperation for peace and justice.

Bio: Nicholas Rademacher is assistant professor of Religious Studies and Coordinator of the Social Justice Minor at Cabrini College in Radnor, Pa. He writes, presents, and teaches on the historical development of Catholic social thought and practice in the United States, as well as the pedagogy of social justice, interfaith dialogue and action for the common good.


Hashtags and Tweets: Information and Communication Technology in the Promotion of Peace

Patrick Flanagan, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor, Department of Theology and Religious Studies
St. John’s University

Description of Presentation: Social media sites like Twitter, Facebook, and blogs have provided an entirely new platform for active civic responsibility as John XXIII taught in Pacem in Terris (nos. 31-32, 73 & 146) and the role of a government in the promotion of the common good (nos. 54, 60- 62). This technological engagement, an entirely new means of communication, has amplified human solidarity and summoned a response to human rights abuses. This paper presentation will proceed in two parts. First, it will demonstrate the significant positive role social media has played in the promotion of peace relying on evidence from the Arab Spring and the Occupy Movement. Second, in light of the teachings of Pacem in Terris and subsequent Roman Catholic social teaching, this paper will discuss a government’s right to deny access to information communication technology, a denial of service (DoS), as evidenced in countries such as Iran, Egypt, and Libya during the emergence of the Arab Spring.

Bio: Patrick Flanagan is assistant professor in the Department of Theology and Religious Studies at St. John's University in Queens, N.Y. (www.stjohns.edu). He received a doctorate in Theological Ethics from Loyola University in Chicago, Ill. (www.luc.edu) in 2007. Prior to graduate work, he worked as a campus minister and taught theology at Niagara University in Niagara Falls, N.Y. (www.niagara.edu); science at Merion Mercy Academy in Merion Station, Pa. (www.merion-mercy.com/); and, math and science at St. Joseph Preparatory Seminary in Princeton, N.J. His particular teaching and research interests include information technology ethics, marketplace morality, and Catholic social teaching.

 

Legacy and Impact | Room 210–214

 

The Legacy of Pacem in Terris: Human Rights, Solidarity and the Right to Development

Meghan J. Clark, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor of Theology and Religious Studies
St. John’s University

Description of Presentation: Pacem in Terris marks a major evolution in Catholic social teaching broadening its scope, incorporating human rights language, and providing the foundation for the coming focus on solidarity and development. John XXIII’s Pacem in Terris is groundbreaking from its opening salutation establishing all people of good will as his intended audience, a tradition continued in all the social encyclicals of Paul VI, John Paul II and Benedict XVI. Having broadened the scope, Pacem in Terris marks a theoretical and political development in Catholic social teaching by incorporating human rights language. Prior to 1963, the Catholic Church had officially resisted using the language of human rights and the 1948 Universal Declaration (despite the strong influence of Catholics on the declaration itself). The genius of Pacem in Terris is that it adopts and adapts the listings of rights found in secular rights theory seeking to transcend the common political debates concerning the canon of human rights. Herein lays the major contribution of Pacem in Terris to both Catholic social teaching and the broader human rights tradition. Building upon his explication of the common good in Mater et Magistra, John XXIII offers an integrated approach to human rights that does not categorize rights as either civil-political or social-economic but instead divides into categories of rights between persons, between individuals and the political authority, within a state, and between states. Human rights as it developed here focus on the dynamic interaction between rights and duties and between persons and communities. In adapting human rights discourse, Pacem in Terris sets the stage for the emerging moral theology of solidarity and the establishing of the right to development as a human right (a right specified in Catholic social teaching almost twenty years before it was officially recognized by the United Nations in 1987). Thus, Pacem in Terris and its dynamic approach to human rights continue to offer much to conversations not only concerning the human right to development but also can guide human rights discourse as it develops further addressing issues of human rights and interdependence (most notably, the responsibility to protect).

Bio: Meghan is assistant professor of theology and religious studies at St. John’s University, N.Y. Her primary research area is Catholic social thought with a special focus on human rights, solidarity and development (with an emerging focus on global health and the Millennium Development Goals). She has published articles in Heythrop Journal, Political Theology, New Blackfriars, and the Journal of Catholic Social Thought. She completed her doctorate at Boston College under the supervision of David Hollenbach, S.J. Meghan is also a member of catholicmoraltheology.com and a lay consultant to the Domestic Justice and Human Development Committee of the USCCB, under Bishop Stephen Blaire.

 

Can Catholic Social Teaching Bring Peace to the "Liturgy Wars"?

Peter Jeffery, Ph.D.
Michael P. Grace II Professor of Medieval Studies
Concurrent Professor of Theology
Concurrent Professor of Anthropology
Co-Director of the Master of Sacred Music Program
University of Notre Dame
Scheide Professor of Music History Emeritus at Princeton University

Description of Presentation: Pacem in Terris and the Constitution on the Sacred Liturgy were published in the same year (1963). Both describe a right to worship and a right to culture. One advocates an active part in public life, the other an active role in the Church’s public prayer. Both mention the changing aspects of modern society that should be seen in the light of eternal, immutable truths. Of course, the implementation of the Constitution gave rise to much that the Council Fathers could not have foreseen: controversies about language, inculturation, modes of participation, distinctions of roles—all provoking antagonisms that have been described as “liturgy wars.” After fifty years, a way to peace might be constructed by applying Catholic social teaching to liturgical theology and practice. The “right to share in the benefits of culture” and the right to worship according to one’s own conscience are surely relevant. In finding the right relationships between the Vatican and the bishop’s conferences, the universal church and the local church, the principles of subsidiarity and solidarity remind us that the ultimate criterion is the good of the human person. Renegotiating the “liturgy wars” on the basis of Catholic social teaching should remind us all that, before approaching the sacrament of Holy Communion, we must offer each other a sign of peace.

Bio: Peter Jeffery, a Benedictine Oblate of St. John's Abbey, Collegeville, tries to live by the monastic motto: Pax! He has published many studies of liturgy and chant, Eastern and Western, medieval and modern, including: Re-Envisioning Past Musical Cultures (1992); A New Commandment: Toward a Renewed Rite for the Washing of Feet (1992); Ethiopian Christian Liturgical Chant: An Anthology (1993-97); The Secret Gospel of Mark Unveiled: Imagined Rituals of Sex, Death, and Madness in a Biblical Forgery (2006). Jeffery's book Translating Tradition: A Chant Historian Reads Liturgiam Authenticam (2005) won an honorable mention from the Catholic Press Association in 2006.

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Friday | March 22 | 2:30 PM

Colloquium Sessions on Social Issues II and Workshop Sessions:

Two Concurrent Presentations of Papers and Two Workshops

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CST Research and Learning Workshop | Room 100–104

 

Learning and Applying CST: Developing Research Tools to Examine Catholic Social Teaching Efforts in Higher Education

Roger Bergman, Ph.D.
Director and Associate Professor, Justice and Peace Studies Program
Creighton University

Description of Workshop: Catholic Social Teaching is not the best-kept secret anymore at Catholic colleges and universities. New initiatives to foster learning about the Catholic social tradition, and commensurate actions on the part of students and faculty, show promise and broad appeal. What is still unknown, however, is the effectiveness of such efforts. How well do our graduates understand CST? Do they see applicability to social challenges they encounter, and endeavor to apply CST principles? What long-term impacts do programs designed to teach the Catholic social tradition have? Colleagues at four colleges and universities plan a national collaboration to explore such questions. This workshop will share our progress to date, review relevant theory and research, and discuss means to build relevant measures (both qualitative and quantitative). We welcome collaborators at any interest level.

 

Learning and Applying CST: Developing Research Tools to Examine Catholic Social Teaching Efforts in Higher Education

Jay Brandenberger, Ph.D.
Director of Research, Center for Social Concerns
Concurrent Associate Professor of Psychology
University of Notre Dame

Description of Workshop: Catholic Social Teaching is not the best-kept secret anymore at Catholic colleges and universities. New initiatives to foster learning about the Catholic social tradition, and commensurate actions on the part of students and faculty, show promise and broad appeal. What is still unknown, however, is the effectiveness of such efforts. How well do our graduates understand CST? Do they see applicability to social challenges they encounter, and endeavor to apply CST principles? What long-term impacts do programs designed to teach the Catholic social tradition have? Colleagues at four colleges and universities plan a national collaboration to explore such questions. This workshop will share our progress to date, review relevant theory and research, and discuss means to build relevant measures (both qualitative and quantitative). We welcome collaborators at any interest level.

Bio: Jay Brandenberger serves as the director of Research and Assessment at the Center for Social Concerns, and as concurrent associate professor in the Department of Psychology at Notre Dame. He directs research initiatives at the Center, working with colleagues to examine the developmental outcomes and best practices associated with Center courses and programs. His research centers on moral development and purpose in life; his work has appeared in a variety of publications, including the Journal of Applied Developmental Psychology, the Michigan Journal of Community Service Learning, the Journal of College Student Development, and the Review of Higher Education.

 

Learning and Applying CST: Developing Research Tools to Examine Catholic Social Teaching Efforts in Higher Education


Kathleen Maas Weigert, Ph.D
Carolyn Farrell, BVM Professor of Women and Leadership
Assistant to the Provost for Social Justice Initiatives
Loyola University Chicago

Description of Workshop: Catholic Social Teaching is not the best-kept secret anymore at Catholic colleges and universities. New initiatives to foster learning about the Catholic social tradition, and commensurate actions on the part of students and faculty, show promise and broad appeal. What is still unknown, however, is the effectiveness of such efforts. How well do our graduates understand CST? Do they see applicability to social challenges they encounter, and endeavor to apply CST principles? What long-term impacts do programs designed to teach the Catholic social tradition have? Colleagues at four colleges and universities plan a national collaboration to explore such questions. This workshop will share our progress to date, review relevant theory and research, and discuss means to build relevant measures (both qualitative and quantitative). We welcome collaborators at any interest level.

Bio: Kathleen Maas Weigert is the Carolyn Farrell, BVM Professor of Women and Leadership and assistant to the Provost for Social Justice Initiatives at Loyola University Chicago. She has lectured, facilitated workshops, taught and published on such topics as experiential and community-based learning, nonviolence, the Catholic social tradition, and education for justice and peace. A co-editor of America's Working Poor (University of Notre Dame Press, 1995), she is also one of the authors of The Search for Common Ground: What Unites and Divides Catholic Americans (Our Sunday Visitor, 1997), which received the “1998 Award for Excellence in Research" from the National Conference of Catechetical Leaders. She is co-editor of Teaching for Justice: Concepts and Models for Service-Learning in Peace Studies (American Association of Higher Education, 1999) and Living the Catholic Social Tradition: Cases and Commentary (Sheed and Ward, 2005). Dr. Maas Weigert is currently researching social justice ideas in the work of Jane Addams and is participating in a multi-university research project on how college students learn and appropriate the Catholic social tradition.

 

Learning and Applying CST: Developing Research Tools to Examine Catholic Social Teaching Efforts in Higher Education

Margaret Pfeil, Ph.D.
Theology/Center for Social Concerns
Fellow, Kroc Institute for International Peace Studies
University of Notre Dame

Description of Workshop: Catholic Social Teaching is not the best-kept secret anymore at Catholic colleges and universities. New initiatives to foster learning about the Catholic social tradition, and commensurate actions on the part of students and faculty, show promise and broad appeal. What is still unknown, however, is the effectiveness of such efforts. How well do our graduates understand CST? Do they see applicability to social challenges they encounter, and endeavor to apply CST principles? What long-term impacts do programs designed to teach the Catholic social tradition have? Colleagues at four colleges and universities plan a national collaboration to explore such questions. This workshop will share our progress to date, review relevant theory and research, and discuss means to build relevant measures (both qualitative and quantitative). We welcome collaborators at any interest level.

Bio: Dr. Margaret R. Pfeil is an assistant professor of Moral Theology at the University of Notre Dame with a joint appointment in the Center for Social Concerns, and she is a Faculty Fellow of the Kroc Institute for International Peace Studies. Her research interests include Catholic social thought, racial justice, ecological ethics, ecumenical dialogue, and peace studies. With Tobias Winright, she coedited Violence, Transformation, and the Sacred: They Shall Be Called Children of God (Orbis Books, 2012). With Gerald Schlabach, she is co-editor of Sharing Peace: Mennonites and Catholics in Conversation (forthcoming, Liturgical Press, 2013), and with Laurie Cassidy and Alex Mikulich she is co-author of The Scandal of White Complicity in U.S. Hyper-incarceration: A Nonviolent Spirituality of White Resistance (forthcoming, Palgrave, 2013). She is a co-founder and resident of the St. Peter Claver Catholic Worker Community in South Bend, Ind.

 

Learning and Applying CST: Developing Research Tools to Examine Catholic Social Teaching Efforts in Higher Education

Kelly Silay
Graduate Student
Loyola University Chicago

Description of Workshop: Catholic Social Teaching is not the best-kept secret anymore at Catholic colleges and universities. New initiatives to foster learning about the Catholic social tradition, and commensurate actions on the part of students and faculty, show promise and broad appeal. What is still unknown, however, is the effectiveness of such efforts. How well do our graduates understand CST? Do they see applicability to social challenges they encounter, and endeavor to apply CST principles? What long-term impacts do programs designed to teach the Catholic social tradition have? Colleagues at four colleges and universities plan a national collaboration to explore such questions. This workshop will share our progress to date, review relevant theory and research, and discuss means to build relevant measures (both qualitative and quantitative). We welcome collaborators at any interest level.

Bio: Kelly is a recent graduate and current graduate student of Loyola University Chicago. She graduated in May 2012 with degrees in psychology and peace studies. She is currently pursuing her Masters degree in social work. Kelly works as the research assistant to Kathleen Maas Weigert.


Learning and Applying CST: Developing Research Tools to Examine Catholic Social Teaching Efforts in Higher Education

Todd Whitmore, Ph.D.
Associate Professor of  Theology
Concurrent Associate Professor of Anthropology
Co-Director, Minor in Catholic Social Tradition
Faculty Fellow, Kellogg Institute for International Studies
Faculty Fellow, Kroc Institute for International Peace Studies
University of Notre Dame

Description of Workshop: Catholic Social Teaching is not the best-kept secret anymore at Catholic colleges and universities. New initiatives to foster learning about the Catholic social tradition, and commensurate actions on the part of students and faculty, show promise and broad appeal. What is still unknown, however, is the effectiveness of such efforts. How well do our graduates understand CST? Do they see applicability to social challenges they encounter, and endeavor to apply CST principles? What long-term impacts do programs designed to teach the Catholic social tradition have? Colleagues at four colleges and universities plan a national collaboration to explore such questions. This workshop will share our progress to date, review relevant theory and research, and discuss means to build relevant measures (both qualitative and quantitative). We welcome collaborators at any interest level.

Bio: Todd Whitmore, Ph.D. is associate professor in the Department of Theology and concurrent associate professor in the Department of Anthropology at the University of Notre Dame. He is also the co-director of the Minor in Catholic Social Tradition. He has been doing fieldwork in northern Uganda and South Sudan since 2005.

 

Catholic Peace Fellowship Workshop | Room 210–214

 

Pursuing Pacem en Terris: From Supporting Conscientious Objectors to War to Healing Moral Injury in Those Returned from Combat

Tom Cornell, D.L.H. (h.c.)
Adjunct professor of Catholic Social Teaching
St. Joseph Seminary, Dunwoodie, NY

Description of Workshop: This workshop will address present social issues having to do with the areas of war, peace and reconciliation, law, and conscience in light of the teaching of Pope John XXIII’s encyclical, Pacem in Terris. This presentation will take up how the Church can forward the promotion of peace today with a special focus on the areas of conscience formation and catechesis, promotion of understanding of conscientious objection and selective conscientious objection before and during war along with what some contemporary clinicians, philosophers and theologians are calling “moral injury” and what Saint Augustine called “anguish of the soul” that marks so many who have undergone military training or participated in combat. In the course of this workshop we will also consider how Christian nonviolence fits in the scheme of CST: Just War Theory meets evangelical pacifism.

Bio: Tom Cornell, A.B, M.S., D.L.H. (h.c.) is a sixty-year veteran of the Catholic Worker movement, active in the peace and civil rights movements and in direct service to the very poor. High-points in my life: organized the first series of demonstrations against U.S. involvement in the Viet Nam war, July 16–25 July, 1963 and the first corporate act of resistance to the Viet Nam draft, the burning of draft card, Nov. 6, 1965. Served a six-month sentence at Danbury federal prison for that. Served as marshall for Martin Luther King's Selma to Montgomery march in 1965. Cofounder of the Catholic Peace Fellowship, with Jim Forest, and of Pax Christi, USA and Guadalupe Catholic Worker house in Waterbury, Conn. Ordained deacon for the Archdiocese of Hartford, 1988, serving now in the Archdiocese of New York.

 

Pursuing Pacem en Terris: From Supporting Conscientious Objectors to War to Healing Moral Injury in Those Returned from Combat

Michael Griffin, M.Div.
Theology Faculty and Director of Service Learning
Holy Cross College

Description of Workshop: This workshop will address present social issues having to do with the areas of war, peace and reconciliation, law, and conscience in light of the teaching of Pope John XXIII’s encyclical, Pacem in Terris. This presentation will take up how the Church can forward the promotion of peace today with a special focus on the areas of conscience formation and catechesis, promotion of understanding of conscientious objection and selective conscientious objection before and during war along with what some contemporary clinicians, philosophers and theologians are calling “moral injury” and what Saint Augustine called “anguish of the soul” that marks so many who have undergone military training or participated in combat. In the course of this workshop we will also consider how Christian nonviolence fits in the scheme of CST: Just War Theory meets evangelical pacifism.

Bio: Michael Griffin has been involved at Catholic Peace Fellowship for the last decade, his main role having been as managing editor of The Sign of Peace journal from 2004–2007. Griffin has been published in several national publications, including the lead article in America Magazine in January 2007, titled “A Soldier’s Decision,” which chronicled the challenges of conscientious objectors to the Iraq War. He is coediting a book of essays by Dr. Paul Farmer of Partners in Health and Gustavo Gutierrez of Notre Dame on the role of accompaniment in strategies for social change. Griffin teaches theology at Holy Cross College and is also completing his doctoral dissertation at Notre Dame, titled “The Politics of Penance: Proposing an Ethic for Social Repair.”

 

Pursuing Pacem en Terris: From Supporting Conscientious Objectors to War to Healing Moral Injury in Those Returned from Combat

Shawn T. Storer, M.Div.
Director, Catholic Peace Fellowship

Description of Workshop: This workshop will address present social issues having to do with the areas of war, peace and reconciliation, law, and conscience in light of the teaching of Pope John XXIII’s encyclical, Pacem in Terris. This presentation will take up how the Church can forward the promotion of peace today with a special focus on the areas of conscience formation and catechesis, promotion of understanding of conscientious objection and selective conscientious objection before and during war along with what some contemporary clinicians, philosophers and theologians are calling “moral injury” and what Saint Augustine called “anguish of the soul” that marks so many who have undergone military training or participated in combat. In the course of this workshop we will also consider how Christian nonviolence fits in the scheme of CST: Just War Theory meets evangelical pacifism.

Bio: Upon graduating from Notre Dame with a B.A. in theology and peace studies in the spring of 2001, Shawn and Michael Baxter revitalized the Catholic Peace Fellowship in South Bend, with the guidance of its original cofounders and numerous supporters around the country. For nine of the past twelve years, Shawn remained actively involved with the work of the Catholic Peace Fellowship in a variety of ways holding a number of positions with the organization. From 2001–2007, Shawn was a theology teacher, campus minister, catechist, administrator, and bus driver at Red Cloud High School, a Jesuit school on the Pine Ridge Reservation in the Diocese of Rapid City, S. Dak. In the summer of 2012, upon graduating from the ND Master of Divinity program, Shawn became the director of the Catholic Peace Fellowship and editor of its journal The Sign of Peace. In addition to working with the CPF, Shawn also develops and instructs courses for the Notre Dame Institute for Church Life’s Satellite Theological Education Program and is ecumenical and interreligious officer for the South Bend side of the Diocese of Fort Wayne/South Bend. He has lived with his family in South Bend since 2007.

 

Global Governance | Room 112–114

 

Catholic Social Thought and the Reform of Global Governance

Kevin Ahern, M.A.
Doctoral Candidate
Boston College

Description of Presentation: Given the increasing number of cross-border challenges that call for a global response, what is the relevancy of John XXIII’s vision for the future of global governance? This paper will address this question by examining Pope John’s position; its reception by Catholics; and how the church’s teachings on state sovereignty, solidarity, subsidiarity and, the global common good might help guide the reforms of global governance structures to better address the challenges facing our planet today.

Bio: Kevin Ahern, a doctoral candidate in theological ethics at Boston College, is concerned with the theological significance of Catholic social movements and the reform of global governance. From 2003 to 2007 he served as the president of International Movement of Catholic Students and is presently the North American Vice President for Pax Romana-ICMICA. He is the editor of Visions of Hope: Emerging Theologians and the Future of the Church (Orbis, 2013). www.kevinjahern.wordpress.com/

 

Recasting the Case for World Government in Pacem in Terris and Caritas in Veritate: A Cogent Response to the Postmodern/postcolonial Accent on Radical Pluralism

John Francis Burke, Ph.D.
Executive Director
The Wolfington Center
Cabrini College

Description of Presentation: This paper critically examines the argument for world government in papal encyclicals, as an extension of universal human rights, as initiated in Pacem in Terris and then in Caritas in Veritate. After articulating the arguments presented by John XXIII and Benedict XVI, the paper then presents the specifics of the postmodern and postcolonial critiques of this narrative for world government. In particular, this critique contends that John XXIII’s articulation of world government in a modern way does not grasp the radical pluralism that characterizes the world’s groups and cultures and in turn, Benedict’s elaboration of John XXIII’s project, in a premodern fashion, is too univocal and static to respond effectively to these differences. To move beyond these respective modern and premodern articulations of world government, the paper suggests that Catholic discourses draw upon the literature of inculturation emerging from the Catholic communities in the developing world.

Bio: John Francis Burke is the newly appointed executive director of the Wolfington Center at Cabrini College in Radnor, Pa. The Wolfington Center seeks to put Catholic social teaching into community engagement. In previous positions at Texas State University, Delta State University, the University of Houston-Downtown, and the University of St. Thomas-Houston is taught political theory, especially with a connection to religious and multicultural issues. At St. Thomas, John also founded and director the Rev. William J. Young Social Justice Institute. Author of Mestizo Democracy (Texas A&M Press, 2002), John has published scholarly articles in numerous journals, including Commonweal and the Review of Politics.

 

Warfare | Room 202

 

War and the Surprising Realism of Catholicism’s Peacemaking Agenda

David Carroll Cochran, Ph.D.
Professor of Politics
Director of the Archbishop Kucera Center
Loras College

Description of Presentation: This presentation will draw on social scientific findings about warfare—trends, causes, preventative measures—to show how the factors emphasized by Catholic teaching on war and peace since Pacem in Terris are the very ones that have proven most effective in reducing war, meaning that while this teaching is often dismissed by its critics as too utopian, the evidence shows that it is in fact deeply realistic.

Bio: Cochran’s primary teaching and research interests are in religion and politics, multiculturalism and democracy, the morality of war, and Irish studies. His previous books are on race and liberalism and Catholicism and American politics. He is currently at work on a book tentatively titled Law and Order Pacifism: Catholicism, Realism, and the Abolition of War, part of which forms the basis for this presentation.

 

War, What Is It Good For? The Catholic Response to Nuclear War and Violence in the 20th Century

Seth J. A. Alexander, ABD
Department of Theology
Loyola University Chicago

Description of Presentation: The bombing of Hiroshima on August 6, 1945 forever changed warfare. After World War II, as armaments began to proliferate, Pius XII wrote two encyclicals, noting with “fear and trepidation” the specter of what the future might bring if nuclear weapons were used in an unfettered manner. Pius recognized that there had been a shift in warfare, making it necessary for the Church to redefine the language of just war. Beginning with Pius XII, the Church has continually found just war problematic in the face of the damage a nuclear conflagration would cause. This paper examines the shift in just war language within the Roman Catholic tradition since the advent of atomic weaponry and the threat of nuclear war. While the Church still upholds a theoretical just war, she has moved against sanctioning the use of nuclear weapons and, by opening conscientious objection as a valid response for the Catholic layperson, has further promulgated a stance of, while not quite pacifism, very limited use of violence.

Bio: Seth Alexander is in the Ph.D. program in Constructive theology and an instructor for the Theology Department at Loyola University Chicago. His research focuses on spirituality in the Middle Ages, particularly that of women in the twelfth and thirteenth centuries. He is currently working on a dissertation that examines the theology of Hadewijch of Brabant and Beatrijs of Nazareth.

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Saturday | March 23 | 8:30 AM

Colloquium Sessions on Social Issues III:

Four Concurrent Presentations of Papers

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Historical Perspectives | Room 210–214

 

Peace on Earth through Fraternity: A Perspective from Social Sciences

Rodrigo Mardones, Ph.D.
Associate Professor
Chair of the Department of Political Science
Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile

Description of Presentation: Since the French Revolution, liberty and equality have motivated political movements, regimens, and constitutions. Yet, contemporary political philosophy and social sciences have all but forgotten fraternity as the third pillar of modern democracy. Despite this fact, roughly the same idea has been conceptualized as civic friendship, social cohesion and solidarity. Similarly, the concept of fraternity is absent in economics, but akin ideas have been considered in the extensive literature of social capital. This line of studies puts into evidence interpersonal relationships and reciprocity, and their role in economic performance. As part of a larger research project, this paper reintroduces the concept of fraternity as a meaningful topic among political scientists and economists. The evolution of the Church’s Social Doctrine represents a rich source for this endeavor. The paper proposes that generalized trust can be conceived as a proxy of fraternity and can be useful for theorizing and performing empirical studies in these disciplines. Although responding to different concerns, trust is also an important concept in the Church’s Social Doctrine. Ultimately, this intellectual exchange is aimed at improving the material welfare of citizens, the functioning of democracy, and the spiritual dimension of human existence.

Bio: Rodrigo Mardones is associate professor and chair of the Department of Political Science at the Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile (UC). He holds a B.A. in History form UC, a MPA degree from Columbia University and a Ph.D. in political Science from New York University. Within the wider area of comparative politics he specializes in local politics, public policy, and education policy. He has recently published and coauthored on the politics of decentralization (Comparative Political Studies) and Chilean politics (Journal of Democracy). His most recent publication is Fraternity and Education (Buenos Aires: Ciudad Nueva, 2013). He participates in the study group for Political Science of the Abba School of the Focolare Movement (Rome, Italy), coordinated by Professor Antonio Baggio, and in the University Network for the Study of Fraternity (RUEF).


Pacem in Terris and the “Perpetual Peace” Genre of the 18th Century

Matthew A. Shadle, Ph.D.
Associate Professor of Religious Studies
Loras College

Description of Presentation: Several authors of the eighteenth century, beginning with the Abbé de Saint-Pierre and continuing with better-known philosophers such as Jean-Jacques Rousseau, Jeremy Bentham, and Immanuel Kant, composed works designed as plans to promote perpetual peace. In general, these works propose that the establishment of republican forms of government is essential to peace, and, with the exception of Rousseau’s, they also claim that peace can only be brought about through the establishment of an international political authority competent to resolve conflicts among states. Although written two centuries later, Pope John XXIII’s encyclical Pacem in Terris demonstrates many of the same characteristics of the much earlier works in the “perpetual peace” genre, including sharing the same conceptual framework and much of the line of argumentation of Kant’s Perpetual Peace: A Philosophical Sketch. This paper will illustrate the ways that John XXIII’s encyclical Pacem in Terris shares important characteristics of the eighteenth-century “perpetual peace” genre of political writing and provide an analysis of what this means for the encyclical’s interpretation.

Bio: Dr. Matthew A. Shadle is associate professor of Moral Theology at Loras College, in Dubuque, Iowa, where he is also the director of the Democracy and Global Diversity program. He received his B.A. in Religion from Hendrix College in Conway, Ark,, and his M.A. and Ph.D. in Theology from the University of Dayton, in Dayton, Ohio. He has published “The Origins of War: A Catholic Perspective’ (Georgetown, 2011) and “No Peace on Earth: War and the Environment” in Green Discipleship: Catholic Theological Ethics and the Environment, edited by Tobias Winright (Anselm Academic, 2011). His work focuses on the development of Catholic social teaching and its intersection with both fundamental moral theology and the social sciences, with special focus on war and peace, the economy, and immigration. He is married and lives in Dubuque.

 

Justice and Peace | Room 202

 

The Poor as Co-Creators of a Just World

James J. Kelly, Jr.
Clinical Professor of Law
University of Notre Dame Law School

Description of Presentation: This paper discusses Catholic social teaching’s exposure of the failings of imaginations in the two dominant perspectives on the plight of the needy among us. It looks at the centrality of the poor to the Church’s vision of human beings as co-creators with God and proposes that such a world view challenges us all to think of economically-oriented legal reforms not so much as redistributing income to meet the needs of the poor but as radically reshaping our society to stop preventing them from being co-creators of a just world. Specifically, the paper shows the consequences of the Church’s social teaching for more inclusive approaches to immigration, education, transportation and land use planning.

Bio: James J. Kelly, Jr. is clinical professor of Law at Notre Dame Law School, where he directs and teaches the Community Development Clinic of the Notre Dame Clinical Law Center. Prior to joining the Notre Dame Law faculty in 2011, he served as assistant professor of Law and director of the Community Development Clinic at the University of Baltimore School of Law. In spring 2011, he taught both Property and Legal Writing II as visiting professor of Law at Washington and Lee University School of Law. Before beginning his teaching career in 2004, Professor Kelly, as executive director of Save A Neighborhood, Inc. and legal consultant for Baltimore's Project 5000, worked to assist the city and community groups in acquiring clear title to vacant houses and vacant lot and, as a staff attorney for the Community Law Center, to represent Baltimore nonprofits in their community revitalization efforts. Prior to moving to Baltimore in 1999, he also represented and counseled tenants and tenant groups for the Northern Manhattan Improvement Corp., where his work was funded by the Skadden Fellowship Foundation.

 

New Relationships in Human Society: A Right to Restorative Justice Dialogue

Susan Sharpe, Ph.D.
Advisor on Restorative Justice and Concurrent Professor of Law
University of Notre Dame

Description of Presentation: Pacem in Terris reminds us that “what has so far been achieved is insufficient compared with what needs to be done” (156) and that incumbent on us is “the task of establishing new relationships in human society” (163). This paper presents restorative justice—a philosophy of justice that has emerged since Pacem in Terris—as an example of the kind of work Pope John XXIII was calling for when he wrote this encyclical. The paper briefly introduces restorative justice practice and its place within the criminal justice system, including ways it is often blocked by well meaning gatekeepers. The paper then discusses justice as a relational concept, highlighting justice needs that too often go unmet. Finally, drawing on guidance set out in the encyclical, the paper argues that the opportunity for dialogue should be a protected right in any official system of redress for criminal harm.

Bio: Susan Sharpe, Ph.D., is advisor on Restorative Justice at the University of Notre Dame. She has been actively involved with restorative justice since 1994 as a practitioner, author, teacher, and consultant. She has worked with government and nonprofit agencies in Canada, the United States, and South Africa on projects related to restorative justice, and has published academic as well as practical work on issues related to best practice. She is adjunct professor in the School of Criminology at Simon Fraser University and a board member of Indiana Legal Services.

 

Peacemakers | Room 112–114

 

A New Kind of Martyr and Peacemaker:

Blessed Franz Jägerstätter as Selective Conscientious Objector

Roger Bergman, Ph.D.
Director and Associate Professor, Justice and Peace Studies Program
Creighton University

Description of Presentation: On October 26, 2007, Pope Benedict XVI beatified Franz Jägerstätter as a martyr of the Catholic faith. This recognition came to pass only because of his discovery by the American Catholic sociologist Gordon Zahn while researching his classic account, German Catholics and Hitler’s Wars (1962). Otherwise unknown, and unheralded even in his native village, Jägerstätter was introduced to the world through Zahn’s second classic book, In Solitary Witness: The Life and Death of Franz Jägerstätter (1964, revised 1986). Jägerstätter was one of only a handful of Catholics throughout Germany and Austria known to have refused induction into Hitler’s army. Although possessing only an 8th grade education, Jägerstätter, unlike the entire Catholic leadership of Germany and Austria, saw clearly the murderous injustice of Hitler’s imperialist wars and acted on his conscience accordingly. He was executed on August 9, 1943. Zahn’s two books contribute substantially to a sociological understanding of conscience that I find conspicuously absent in the tradition of Catholic moral theology. This essay will 1) offer a narrative interpretation of Jägerstätter as a selective conscientious objector—a new kind of martyr—in the context of the brief presentation of conscience in Pacem in Terris (#51); 2) elaborate Zahn’s sociology of conscience both in regard to the German bishops and to Jägerstätter; and 3) offer some general implications for moral education in the context of Catholic higher education.

Bio: Roger Bergman, Ph.D., is founding director (since 1995) of the Justice and Peace Studies Program at Creighton University. His research is in moral development and moral education and especially justice pedagogies in the Catholic university. He has published in Catholic Education: A Journal of Inquiry and Praxis, Human Development, Journal for Peace and Justice Studies, Journal for Research in Character Education, Journal of Catholic Higher Education, Journal of Moral Education, and Studies in Philosophy and Education. A former board member of the Association for Moral Education, his book Catholic Social Learning: Educating the Faith That Does Justice was published by Fordham University Press in 2011 and received a 3rd Place Award in the Educational Books category from the Catholic Press Association in 2012.

 

Working for Peace After Pacem in Terris:

Dorothy Day as a Catalyst for and Embodiment of the Encyclical

Daniel Cosacchi, M.T.S.
Doctoral Student (ABD)
Theology Department
Loyola University Chicago

Description of Presentation: This paper explores the importance of Dorothy Day through the lens of Pacem in Terris. In particular, it presents Day as an important forerunner to the promulgation of the encyclical; it highlights the ways in which she felt the encyclical fell short, and the ways in which she was an ideal embodiment of the encyclical; and finally, the paper looks ahead to the Church’s role in the peacemaking process of the twenty-first century. The most important continuation of Day’s movement toward peace is of an ecumenical and inter-religious nature. The figure of Dorothy Day underlines the entire paper because of her vast importance in American Catholicism during the twentieth century. She is of further interest in this particular historical moment because of the recent unanimous vote on the part of the United States Bishops to advance her cause of canonization. The paper will allude to the ways in which the American hierarchy is “using” her today.

Bio: Daniel Cosacchi is a third-year doctoral student (A.B.D.) in Christian ethics, in the Theology department at Loyola University, Chicago. He has particular interests in just war theory and especially pacifist alternatives to warfare. He holds degrees from Fordham University and Boston College, and has written about Ignacio Ellacuría, Oscar Romero, and the Salvadoran civil war; Catholic social thought and the environment; and the treatment of total warfare in Vatican II. He is writing his dissertation on the deleterious effects of war on the environment and the importance of this phenomenon in the corpus of Catholic social thought.

 

Peace, Human Rights, and Solidarity | Room 100–104

 

Human Rights and CST

Mark Ensalaco, Ph.D.
Associate Professor of Political Science
Founding Director, Human Rights Program
University of Dayton

Description of Presentation: This chapter of the book A Vision of Justice: Engaging Catholic Social Teaching on the College Campus (Susan Crawford Sullivan and Ron Pagnucco, editors) will discuss how the Church has extolled the United Nations Universal Declaration of Human rights as “a milestone on mankind’s moral progress,” due to the shared belief that respect for the inherent dignity of the human person is the foundation for freedom, justice, and peace in the world. The Church actively promotes human dignity and rights throughout the world in dialogue with secular human rights organizations. Catholic Social Teaching offers vital contributions to the promotion of human dignity and rights. It teaches that all human beings are free and equal in dignity and rights because God created them in his likeness and image, that God endowed human beings with reason and conscience and commanded them to act in solidarity towards one another in a spirit of love, that personal rights must be balanced with duties to the common good, and that demands for justice must be tempered with appeals for reconciliation in the search for peace.

Bio: As member of the University of Dayton faculty since 1989, Mark Ensalaco regularly teaches courses in the Politics of Human Rights, Comparative Politics: Latin America, United States—Latin America Relations and Political Violence. His research interests include human rights and human trafficking, Middle Eastern Terrorism, and U.S. and Latin America Relations, and he speaks and writes regularly on the intersections of these topics. Mark is a member of the ACCU Peace and Justice Education Advisory Committee.

 

Peacebuilding: the Missing Dimension of Catholic Social Teaching

Gerard F. Powers, J.D.
Director of Catholic Peacebuilding Studies
Kroc Institute for International Peace Studies
University of Notre Dame

Description of Presentation: This chapter of the book A Vision of Justice: Engaging Catholic Social Teaching on the College Campus (Susan Crawford Sullivan and Ron Pagnucco, editors) will discuss CST’s rich tradition of reflection on peace. This tradition includes both the ethics of war and peace (just war and nonviolence) as well as the less-studied spirituality, theology, ethics, and praxis of peacebuilding (conflict prevention, conflict management, and post-conflict reconciliation). The Catholic Peacebuilding Network is one effort of universities, bishops’ conferences, development agencies, and independent Catholic organizations that is working to enhance the study and practice of peacebuilding. Since peace is not just the absence of war, but the result of justice motivated by love, peace calls for the development of just institutions at all levels of society, including international institutions that can address questions that individual nations cannot address alone.

Bio: Gerard Powers is the director of Catholic Peacebuilding Studies at the Kroc Institute for International Peace Studies at the University of Notre Dame. He is also the coordinator of the Catholic Peacebuilding Network, which links scholars and Catholic leaders of two dozen Church and academic institutions in the United States and countries torn by war in an effort to enhance the study and practice of conflict prevention, conflict management, and post-conflict reconciliation. From 1998–2004, he was director of the Office of International Justice and Peace of the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops, and from 1987–1998 was a foreign policy advisor in the same office. He is co-editor (with R. Schreiter and S. Appleby) of Peacebuilding: Catholic Theology, Ethics and Praxis (Orbis, 2010); co-editor (with D. Philpott) of Strategies of Peace: Transforming Conflict in a Violent World (Oxford 2010).

 

Catholic Social Teaching, Poverty, and Student Development

Susan Crawford Sullivan, Ph.D.
Associate Professor of Sociology
Edward Bennett William Fellow
College of the Holy Cross

Description of Presentation: This chapter of the book A Vision of Justice: Engaging Catholic Social Teaching on the College Campus (Susan Crawford Sullivan and Ron Pagnucco, editors) will discuss how student learning on issues of poverty in conjunction with Catholic social teaching can contribute to student moral and civic development. Catholic social teaching calls for a preferential option for the poor and for solidarity with the poor, and assumes that participation in societal life, local and global, public and economic, is an inherently moral undertaking. To that end, CST can be a powerful tool in preparing students for the ethical and moral dimensions of professional practice and good citizenship by drawing them into reflection of their professions as vocations in service to the common good, especially the vulnerable and powerless.

Bio: Susan Crawford Sullivan is an assistant professor of sociology and Edward Bennett Williams Fellow at the College of the Holy Cross. Her research interests lie at the intersection of sociology of religion, family, and poverty and public policy. Her book, Living Faith: Everyday Religion and Mothers in Poverty (University of Chicago Press 2011), won the 2012 Society for the Scientific Study of Religion Distinguished Book Award and the 2012 American Sociological Association’s Distinguished Book Award from the sociology of religion section. Dr. Sullivan has published articles in journals such Sociology of Religion; Review of Religious Research; Journal of Catholic Higher Education; and the Journal of College Student Development. She is currently coediting the volume A Vision of Justice: Engaging Catholic Social Teaching on the College Campus (forthcoming, Liturgical Press). She received her Master in Public Affairs from Princeton University’s Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs and her Ph.D. in sociology from Harvard University. Prior to entering academia, Dr. Sullivan held a number of nonprofit positions, including with Catholic Charities, working with pregnant and parenting adolescents; and with UNICEF in Mozambique working on issues of child soldiers and orphans, and in Nepal on child labor issues. She also served as a U.S. Air Force intelligence officer early in her career. Since 2009, she has been an active member of the Peace and Justice National Advisory Committee of the Association of Catholic Colleges and Universities.

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Saturday | March 23 | 11:30 AM

Colloquium Sessions on Social Issues IV:

Four Concurrent Presentations of Papers

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Living CST | Room 100–104

 

Religion, State, and Civil Society in Catholic Social Teaching

David Coleman, Ph.D.
Professor of Religious Studies
Chaminade University

Description of Presentation: This chapter of the book A Vision of Justice: Engaging Catholic Social Teaching on the College Campus (Susan Crawford Sullivan and Ron Pagnucco, editors) will discuss the types of relationships religious communities have to civil society and the state; forms of church and individual Catholic engagement with society and state; the role of civil society and the state in Catholic Social Teaching; the purpose of the state and of law; and modes of political argument/reasoning for the common good in a pluralistic society.

Bio: David Coleman is currently a professor of Religion and dean of the Humanities and Fine Arts Division at Chaminade University of Honolulu. His educational background includes Philosophy, Asian Religions and Philosophy (particularly Buddhism), Catholic Theology and Education, and Political Theory. David’s research interests center around the experience that is the sacred, the religious traditions that arise from that experience, and their interactions with culture and society in the emerging global community. Recently, he has been working on the how Catholic institutions of higher learning can contribute to the dialogue between the Catholic community, other religious communities and the wider secular society, particularly as that dialogue touches on justice, peace and service. David Coleman is a member of the ACCU Peace and Justice Education Advisory Committee.

 

Economy and Dignity of Work

Joseph Torma, Ph.D.
Professor of Theology
Walsh University

Description of Presentation: This chapter will discuss how CST offers a moral vision for the economy where “the dignity and complete vocation of the human person and the welfare of society as a whole are to be respected and promoted” (#331, Compendium of Catholic Social Doctrine). CST asserts that the economy should serve the person, and that “everyone has the right to participate in economic life and the duty to contribute, each according to his own capacity” (#333, Compendium of Catholic Social Doctrine). Work is the essential way people develop their capacities, provide for the material needs of their families, contribute to the common good, and participate in God’s creation. The new economic realities of our time call for a deeper engagement between economics and CST. Concepts such as the dignity of labor, the common good, the preferential option for the poor, and human solidarity are essential to forge a more just, merciful, and sustainable global economy.

Bio: Dr. Joseph Torma is professor of theology at Walsh University, where he teaches The Church in the Modern World, Christian Moral Life, Christian Spirituality, and Social Ministry. He has written books on organizing parish social action committees and an academic pastoral ministry program, the principles of justice and peace, family as domestic church, and the church. Joe has been active in peace and justice and campus ministry, and he currently serves on the ACCU Peace and Justice Advisory Committee. In addition, he has worked for the diocese of Rochester, N.Y., organizing and training parish social action committees and been involved with the Rochester Catholic Worker as well as the start of a Catholic Worker House in Alliance, Ohio.

 

Religious Freedom and Secularism | Room 210–214

 

Keeping the Faith of Peace-making in a Secular World

Margarita M. Rose, Ph.D.
Professor of Economics
Chairperson of the Department of Economics
King’s College

Description of Presentation: How does a peace and justice organization founded by an interfaith group of community activists adjust to a membership that is much more secular, if not outright hostile to organized religion? As it embarks on the celebration of its 25th Anniversary, the Interfaith Resource Center for Peace and Justice in Wilkes-Barre, Pa. looks back on the influences of Pacem in Terris, the Catholic Worker Movement, and other expressions of Catholic Social Teaching on the founding members of the organization. Whether Catholic, Protestant, or Jewish, early members were conversant in the language of Pacem in Terris and receptive to its tenets. Many of today’s younger members came to their peace and justice perspectives independent of religious training and are suspicious of any “teaching” that comes from the Catholic hierarchy. This presentation reports the results of interviews with Catholic and non-Catholic founders of the organization on their knowledge of Pacem in Terris and its influence on the early days of the organization. It also describes the changing demographics of the membership and leadership of the organization in terms of religious (non) affiliation and de-emphasis on faith-based references in its work. Finally, the presentation discusses more recent efforts to reclaim the faith-basis of the organization’s founding, while maintaining the energy and interest of younger members, by engaging in a study of the spirit of Pacem in Terris and demonstrating its relevance in the twenty-first century.

Bio: Margarita is a professor of Economics and Chairperson of the Department of Economics at King’s College in Wilkes-Barre, Pa. She holds her doctoral degree from the University of Notre Dame, where as a graduate student she co-chaired the campus Anti-Apartheid Network. Her undergraduate studies in International Relations took place at Saint Joseph’s University in Philadelphia. Since arriving in Wilkes-Barre in 1989, Dr. Rose has been a member of the Interfaith Resource Center for Peace and Justice (Peace and Justice Center), serving for several years on the steering committee, including as coordinator. Currently, she serves as that organization’s Treasurer and is involved in developing a minor in Peace and Justice Studies at King’s College. She is married to Bob Tuttle, professor of Sociology at Wilkes University; together they are the proud parents of high school junior Mairéad and 8th grader Eamon.

 

Keeping the Faith of Peace-making in a Secular World

Rodrigo Gereda
M.Div. Candidate, John XXIII Theological Institute, Arizona
Chief Facilitator and Acting Director, The Interfaith Resource Center for Peace and Justice

Description of Presentation: How does a peace and justice organization founded by an interfaith group of community activists adjust to a membership that is much more secular, if not outright hostile to organized religion? As it embarks on the celebration of its 25th Anniversary, the Interfaith Resource Center for Peace and Justice in Wilkes-Barre, Pa. looks back on the influences of Pacem in Terris, the Catholic Worker Movement, and other expressions of Catholic social teaching on the founding members of the organization. Whether Catholic, Protestant, or Jewish, early members were conversant in the language of Pacem in Terris and receptive to its tenets. Many of today’s younger members came to their peace and justice perspectives independent of religious training and are suspicious of any “teaching” that comes from the Catholic hierarchy. This presentation reports the results of interviews with Catholic and non-Catholic founders of the organization on their knowledge of Pacem in Terris and its influence on the early days of the organization. It also describes the changing demographics of the membership and leadership of the organization in terms of religious (non) affiliation and de-emphasis on faith-based references in its work. Finally, the presentation discusses more recent efforts to reclaim the faith-basis of the organization’s founding, while maintaining the energy and interest of younger members, by engaging in a study of the spirit of Pacem in Terris and demonstrating its relevance in the twenty-first century.

Bio: Rodrigo “Rod” Gereda guides his personal and professional activities by a commitment to the common good and the building of community through servant leadership. Rod is currently the chief facilitator and acting director for the Interfaith Resource Center for Peace and Justice and the chief mediation trainer for The Father James Doyle, C.S.C., Community Mediation Institute in Wilkes-Barre, Pa. In the practice of conflict resolution, his service to building community is known as Transformational Leadership. Rod offers services in Servant Leadership Skills, Conflict Resolution Techniques, and Service Leadership Initiatives (all bilingual programs). Rod and his family enjoy being involved in the parish life at St. Nicholas Church in Wilkes-Barre, in particular his involvement as Extraordinary Minister of Holy Communion. Currently, Rod is active in launching Building Communities of Peace. This is a country-wide community dialogue seminar promoting peace and social integration. Rod also serves on many community advisory groups and boards throughout various counties and at the national level. Rod holds a Bachelor of Architecture from the University of Houston, and is in his second year as a candidate for his Master of Divinity. Above all, Rod enjoys the practice of family alongside his wife Kathy. His proudest achievement: his three Girl Scout daughters - Arisa Lucía (18), Katarina María (16) and Maria Lucía (13).

 

The Development of Religious Freedom in Catholic Social Teaching: from Pacem in Terris to “Religious Freedom, Path to Peace”

Angela Senander, Ph.D.
Associate Professor, Merrimack College
Research Fellow, Berkley Center for Religion, Peace, and World Affairs
Georgetown University

Description of Presentation: The emphasis placed on freedom in Pacem in Terris is a notable development in relationship to the prior documents of modern Catholic social teaching. Despite this emphasis on freedom, one does not find the term “religious freedom” in this document. Instead, one finds a more limited right to worship and to profess one’s beliefs (PT #14). In contrast, Pope Benedict XVI, in his World Day of Peace Message forty-five years after Dignitatis humanae, offers a broader understanding of religious freedom and places greater emphasis on this right: “among the rights and freedoms rooted in the dignity of the person, religious freedom enjoys a special status” (“Religious Freedom, Path to Peace” #5). To better understand this development in Catholic social teaching, we will consider the significance of two moments of doctrinal development: the broader understanding of free exercise of religion in Dignitatis humanae and the emphasis on promotion of justice as constitutive of proclaiming the Gospel in Justitia in mundo.

Bio: Angela Senander is a research fellow at Georgetown University’s Berkley Center for Religion, Peace, and World Affairs, as well as an associate professor at Merrimack College. She is the author of Scandal: The Catholic Church and Public Life (Liturgical Press, 2012). Prior to publishing this book, she taught and wrote about faith and public life as a member of the faculty at Washington Theological Union.

 

CST and the World Community | Room 202

 

Love Your Enemies: the Church, the Nation, and the Lives of Others

Matthew Bagot, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor
Department of Theology
Spring Hill College

Description of Presentation: This presentation will be a response in light of Catholic Social Teaching to John Tirman’s recent book, The Deaths of Others: The Fate of Civilians in America’s Wars (Oxford UP, 2011), which explores the apparent indifference of Americans to civilian casualties in their nation’s wars. Tirman attributes this indifference to the nation’s supposedly divine mission of “taming the wilderness” in light of which violence is deemed both regenerative and redemptive. The presentation will examine the relationship between religion and national identity and will argue for a cosmopolitan approach to national identity that provides resources for American Christians to engage critically with their nation’s foreign policy.

Bio: Matthew Bagot teaches social ethics in the department of theology at Spring Hill College, Mobile, Ala. His work focuses on the relationship between religion and international politics, religion and human rights, and issues of war and peace from the perspective of Catholic social teaching. He is a convert to the Catholic faith and is originally from England.

 

Pacem in Terris and H. Richard Niebuhr: On the Possibility of “a World Government”

John Crowley-Buck, M.A.
Ph.D. Candidate
Department of Theology
Loyola University Chicago

Description of Presentation: What is the possibility of a world government today? Both Pacem in Terris and H. Richard Niebuhr offer nuanced responses to this question, but these responses differ insofar as each accounts, in its own way, for the theological category of sin. This presentation will juxtapose Pacem in Terris and H. Richard Niebuhr in order to tease out the genuine possibility of a world government today. If a world government is possible, what might it look like? If a world government is not possible, then where does that leave us with regard to important issues like human dignity and human rights? How might a robust account of sin affect the outcomes of these questions, and will this effect be positive or negative? These are just a few of the questions I will seek to address in the course of this presentation.

Bio: John Crowley-Buck is a Ph.D. candidate in the Department of Theology at Loyola University Chicago. He received his BA in Theology and English and his MA in Theological Ethics from Boston College. John is a Ph.D. candidate at Loyola University Chicago. His interests pertain primarily to the field of ethics, and include foundational ethics, political theology, social ethics and hermeneutics. He is an instructor in the Department of Theology and the graduate research assistant at Loyola’s Joan and Bill Hank Center for the Catholic Intellectual Heritage. John’s dissertation focuses on the concept of human dignity, as it is played out in Kant and the Natural Law, as a foundation for Christian ethics.

 

Migration and Structural Sin | Room 112–114

 

“Truly a person:” Approaching Migration as a Peace Issue in a Transnational Age

Susan Bigelow Reynolds, M.Ed.
M.T.S., Boston College School of Theology and Ministry, 2013

Description of Presentation: Fifty years ago, Pacem in Terris affirmed the right to freedom of movement both within and beyond one’s country of origin. The rights of migrants and refugees form a brief but by no means insignificant point of focus in the encyclical. In this paper, I will ague that in the twenty-first century, which some scholars have already termed the “age of migration,” the extent to which the rights of migrants are upheld constitutes an important, necessary, and challenging litmus test in assessing global progress toward the Catholic vision of peace laid out in Pacem in Terris. This paper will focus on the contemporary reality of U.S.-Latin American immigration, which can also be (but rarely is) regarded as a refugee situation, given the severity of the ongoing drug war and the continued threat posed by femicide in areas such as Ciudad Juarez, Mexico. In the United States, immigration is considered a political, economic, and "security" issue but is rarely approached through a hermeneutic of peace. I will argue that Pacem in Terris and the Catholic social teaching on migration it influenced provide a framework for understanding migration as, fundamentally, a peace issue.

Bio: Susan graduated from the University of Notre Dame in 2009 with a B.A. in Theology and Political Science. After graduating, Susan moved to Brownsville, Tex., where she taught middle school language arts and social studies at St. Anthony Catholic School for two years while earning her Masters of Education from Notre Dame’s Alliance for Catholic Education program. Captivated by the distinct Catholic devotional practice she encountered in the border community where she lived, she decided to pursue her Masters in Theological Studies at Boston College School of Theology and Ministry, where she works as a research assistant on the National Study of Catholic Parishes with Hispanic Ministry. She will graduate with her M.T.S. this May. Her primary research interests are in the areas of theology and migration, lived religion, and the relationship of religious experience and place. Susan lives in Boston with her husband Drew.

 

Learning How to Care for Climate Change Refugees from Pope John XXIII and Pope Benedict XVI

Daniel R. DiLeo
Masters in Theological Studies 2013
Boston College School of Theology and Ministry
Project Manager, Catholic Coalition on Climate Change

Description of Presentation: “Learning How to Respond to Climate Change Refugees from Pope John XXIII and Pope Benedict XVI” seeks to appropriate the teachings of Pacem in Terris regarding political refugees in light of the phenomenon of “climate change refugees” recognized by Pope Benedict XVI. At the same time, this paper will argue that the treatment of immigration and emigration that is articulated in Pacem in Terris—and which supports the document’s framework for addressing political refugees—must be supplemented by Pope Benedict XVI’s 2011 Message for the World Day of Migrants and Refugees in order to address the phenomenon of climate change refugees. In sum, this paper will argue that Pacem in Terris and key teachings of Pope Benedict XVI together provide a framework for addressing those displaced by what the Holy Father has called “a grave concern for the entire human family.

Bio: Daniel R. DiLeo is a Master of Theological Studies Candidate (’13) at the Boston College School of Theology and Ministry, where he is pre-Ph.D. concentrating in Moral Theology. His research interests lie at the intersection of Catholic social thought, political theology, virtue ethics, and environmental and economic justice, and he is specifically drawn to the issue of climate change. Since 2009 he has worked as project manager for the USCCB-endorsed Catholic Coalition on Climate Change.

 

Theological and Practical Responses to John XXIII’s Call to Peace

Katie Mahowski
Masters in Theological Studies 2013
Boston College School of Theology and Ministry

Description of Presentation: Writing to all people of good will, and not just to Catholics, John XXIII tried to find the basis for lasting peace in the midst of conflict. Although the Cold War has ended and the threat of nuclear war has shifted to the background, the vision of John XXIII remains relevant. Grounded in a holistic vision of peace, John XXIII took progressive positions on migration, political refugees, and the development of economically underdeveloped nations. His vision provides an excellent framework for ongoing discussions of structural injustice. This paper examines theological and practical responses to Pacem In Terris including Catholic Social Teaching and the Community of Sant'Egidio.

Bio: Katie Mahowski is a Masters in Theological Studies student at Boston College's School of Theology and Ministry. She completed her Bachelors of Arts in Religion and Linguistics summa cum laude from the University of Florida in 2011. Her interests are in the field of social ethics and inter-religious dialogue. Her undergraduate thesis examined a community of second-generation Indian-American immigrants in the state of Florida and the transplantation of the celebration of Navratri from India to the United States.

 

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Saturday | March 23 | 2:00 PM

Social Action with Justice Partners Discussion:

Informal Presentation and Discussion of College Social Ministry Partnerships

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Ronald Pagnucco, Ph.D.
Associate Professor of Peace Studies
Chair, Department of Peace Studies
College of St. Benedict/St. John’s University

Bio: Ron Pagnucco has authored or coauthored essays that have appeared in Human Rights Quarterly; Research in Social Movements, Conflict and Change; The Journal of Intergroup Relations; Research on Democracy and Society; the Journal for Peace and Justice Studies, and in Disruptive Religion (C. Smith, ed. Routledge, 1995). With Jackie Smith and Charles Chatfield, he coedited Transnational Social Movements and Global Politics (1997) and he coedited with Chris Hausmann a special issue of the Journal for Peace and Justice Studies on "Peacebuilding in Africa" (Volume 20: Number 2, 2011). Ron is a member of the Peace and Justice Education Advisory Committee of the ACCU.

 

Aaron Matthew Weldon, M.Div.
Intern, The Catholic Campaign for Human Development
United States Conference of Catholic Bishops

Bio: Aaron Weldon is a Ph.D. student in Systematic Theology at The Catholic University of America. He received a B.S. in Biomedical Engineering from Texas A&M University and a M.Div. from Fuller Theological Seminary, focusing on ecclesiology and contemporary Anabaptist theology. His primary research interests are ecclesiology, vicarious suffering, theological language, and the nature-grace debates.

 

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Saturday | March 23 | 3:15 PM

Panel on Peace in Catholic Social Tradition

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Margaret Pfeil, Ph.D.
Theology/Center for Social Concerns
Fellow, Kroc Institute for International Peace Studies
University of Notre Dame

Bio: Dr. Margaret R. Pfeil is an assistant professor of Moral Theology at the University of Notre Dame with a joint appointment in the Center for Social Concerns, and she is a Faculty Fellow of the Kroc Institute for International Peace Studies. Her research interests include Catholic social thought, racial justice, ecological ethics, ecumenical dialogue, and peace studies. With Tobias Winright, she coedited Violence, Transformation, and the Sacred: They Shall Be Called Children of God (Orbis Books, 2012). With Gerald Schlabach, she is co-editor of Sharing Peace: Mennonites and Catholics in Conversation (forthcoming, Liturgical Press, 2013), and with Laurie Cassidy and Alex Mikulich she is co-author of The Scandal of White Complicity in U.S. Hyper-incarceration: A Nonviolent Spirituality of White Resistance (forthcoming, Palgrave, 2013). She is a co-founder and resident of the St. Peter Claver Catholic Worker Community in South Bend, Ind.

 

Todd Whitmore, Ph.D.
Associate Professor of  Theology
Concurrent Associate Professor of Anthropology
Co-Director, Minor in Catholic Social Tradition
Faculty Fellow, Kellogg Institute for International Studies
Faculty Fellow, Kroc Institute for International Peace Studies
University of Notre Dame

Bio: Todd Whitmore, Ph.D. is associate professor in the Department of Theology and concurrent associate professor in the Department of Anthropology at the University of Notre Dame. He is also the co-director of the Minor in Catholic Social Tradition. He has been doing fieldwork in northern Uganda and South Sudan since 2005.

 

Emily Sipos-Butler, M.Div.
Research Associate, Catholic Peacebuilding Network
Kroc Institute for International Peace Studies
University of Notre Dame

Bio: Emily Sipos-Butler holds a Master of Divinity from the University of Notre Dame and is currently a research associate with the Catholic Peacebuilding Network (CPN). CPN, cofounded and sponsored by the Kroc Institute for International Peace Studies, seeks to enhance the study and practice of Catholic peacebuilding. Prior to coming to Kroc, she worked on a variety of local and national peace and justice initiatives, including working with Notre Dame’s Center for Social Concerns in support of the Catholic Campaign for Human Development. She participated for several years in the local Bridgefolk Catholic-Mennonite dialogue, served on the boards of local peace groups and community empowerment organizations, and taught justice education at St. Mary’s College and through adult faith formation groups.

 

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