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Nathan Evans

Contact: nevans2@nd.edu

I am a sixth year PhD student in the Lamberti Lab. I arrived at Notre Dame the summer of 2010, from Oklahoma State University, where I completed a MS in Fisheries Ecology and Management. While my research interests are diverse, they primarily involve the conservation and restoration of aquatic biodiversity and ecosystem function. Currently, I am involved with the Notre Dame Environmental Change InitiativeCulvert on a Department of Defense-funded research project trying to determine if environmental DNA (eDNA) metabarcoding can be used to improve aquatic bioassessment particularly for rare and at-risk fish and amphibians. The goal of this project is to develop an eDNA metabarcoding approach that can accurately measure fish and amphibian species diversity (species richness and abundance) in both artificial and natural ecosystems. As outgrowth of this research, I have also completed a research project focused on determining the distribution of Brook Trout in the Namekagon River, WI watershed using eDNA surveillance techniques. In addition to my work on eDNA methods and applications, I am working with the U.S. Forest Service to investigate the movement of fishes in the Huron-Manistee National Forest following road culvert removal. In this project, we have implanted stream fish with small electronic tags that enable us to describe when fish are moving above, below, and through road crossings. CulvertThe goal of this project is to determine the effectiveness of alternative road crossings (bridges) at improving stream connectivity for both sport and non-sport fish species. Ultimately, I would like to see the knowledge gained in my research applied not only to the future conservation and management of aquatic ecosystems, but toward the successful structural and functional restoration of degraded aquatic systems. The goal of this project is to determine if novel management strategies that reduce nutrient and sediment export also enhance stream biodiversity. In addition to my work in agricultural streams, I am working with the U.S. Forest Service to investigate movement of fishes in the Huron-Manistee National Forest following road culvert removal. In this project, we have implanted stream fish with small electronic tags that enable us to describe when fish are moving above, below, and through road crossings. The goal of this project is to determine the effectiveness of alternative road crossings (bridges) at improving stream connectivity for both sport and non-sport fish species. Ultimately, I would like to see the knowledge gained in my research applied not only to the future conservation and management of aquatic ecosystems, but toward the successful structural and functional restoration of degraded aquatic systems.
 

 


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