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WHY STUDY STV?

PROGRAM OVERVIEW

FACULTY AND STAFF

ADVISING APPOINTMENTS

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Faculty and Staff

Matthew Ashley
Kathleen Biddick
Michael J. Crowe
Michael De Paul
Dennis P. Doordan
Christopher Fox
Christopher Hamlin
Don Howard
Janet Kourany
Edward Manier
Vaughn McKim
Michael Rae
Philip Ramsey
Maura Ryan
Kristin Shrader-Frechette
Phillip Sloan
Andrew Weigart
Robert Wolosin

Matthew Ashley

(Ph.D. University of Chicago, 1993). Assistant Professor of Theology. Science and theology,liberation theology. Books: Interruptions: Mysticism, Theology and Politics in the Work of Johannes Baptist Metz (1998); editor/translator: J. B. Metz,A Passion for God: The Mystical-Political Dimension of Christianity (1998).

Recent Articles: "The Turn to Spirituality? The Relationship Between Theology and Spirituality" (1995); "A Post-Einsteinian Settlement? On Spirituality as a Possible Border-Crossing Between Religion and the New Science" (1998).

Email:  James.M.Ashley.2@nd.edu

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Kathleen Biddick

Ph.D.:  University of Toronto, 1982  Title: Professor of history. Research Interests:  Medieval social and economic history, especially archaeology, quantitative methods, and the history of gender. Most recently, Professor Biddick's research relates developments in current feminist theory to medieval studies.

Publications:

The Other Economy: Pastoral Husbandry on a Medieval Estate (California, 1989); Editor, Archaeological Approaches to Medieval Europe (Medieval Institute, 1984); The Shock of Medievalism (Duke University Press, 1998).

Email: Biddick.1@nd.edu

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Michael J. Crowe

Michael J. Crowe, an historian of science, is Professor Emeritus in the Program of Liberal Studies and Concurrent Professor of History. He was the founding director and first chair of Notre Dame's Graduate Program in History and Philosophy of Science. His special area of teaching and research is the history of astronomy, physics, and mathematics in the period from 1600 to 1900. He holds B.A. (P.L.S.) and B.S. (science) degrees from Notre Dame and a doctorate in history of science from the University of Wisconsin. His books include A History of Vector Analysis: The Evolution of the Idea of a Vectorial System (1967), which won a Jean Scott Prize from La Maison des Sciences de l'Homme in Paris, The Extraterrestrial Life Debate 1750-1900: The Idea of a Plurality of Worlds from Kant to Lowell (1986), for which a Japanese translation is in preparation, Theories of the World from Ptolemy to Copernicus (1990), The Letters and Papers of Sir John Herschel: A Guide to the Manuscripts and Microfilm (1991), Modern Theories of the Universe from Herschel to Hubble (1994), and A Calendar of the Correspondence of Sir John F. W. Herschel (1998). He has also authored over seventy articles, booklets, and reviews. A Woodrow Wilson Fellow and a member of Phi Beta Kappa, he has been awarded four major research grants from the National Science Foundation. Courses he has offered in the STV Program include History of Modern Astronomy and Topics in the History of Modern Physical Science 1600-1900. 

Email:  Michael.J.Crowe.1@nd.edu  

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Michael De Paul

Associate Professor (Ph.D., Brown University) Ethics, Epistemology

Books: Balance and Refinement: Beyond Coherentism in Moral Inquiry, (1993).

Recent Articles:
"Two Conceptions of Coherence Methods in Ethics," Mind, (1987); "The Problem of the Criterion and Coherence Methods in Ethics," Canadian Journal of Philosophy, (1988); "Naivete and Corruption in Moral Inquiry," Philosophy and Phenomenological Research, (1988); "Argument and Perception: The Role of Literature in Moral Inquiry," The Journal of Philosophy, (1988); "Moral Statuses," Australasian Journal of Philosophy, (1988); "The Highest Moral Knowledge and the Truth Behind Moral Internalism," Southern Journal of Philosophy, (1990).

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Christopher Fox

(Ph.D., SUNY- Binghamton, 1978). Professor of English and Associate Dean of the College of Arts and Letters. Interactions between literature and medicine, psychology and science during the 18th century. Books: (editor) Psychology and Literature in the Eighteenth Century (1987); Locke and the Scriblerians: Identity and Consciousness in Eighteenth Century Britain (1988); (editor) Gulliver's Travels: A Case Study in Contemporary Criticism (1994); (coeditor) Inventing Human Science: Eighteenth Century Domains (1995); Introducer and editor, Gulliver's Travels: Complete Authoritative Text (1995); (editor) Walking Naboth's Vineyand: New Studies of Swift. Recent Articles: "Defining Eighteenth Century Psychology: Some Problems and Perspectives"(1987); "Of Logic and Lycanthropy: Gulliver and the Faculties of the Mind" (1993); "How to Prepare a Noble Savage: the Spectacle of Human Science" (1995); "Swift and the Spectacle of Human Science" (1995).

Email:  Christopher.B.Fox.1@nd.edu

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Dennis P. Doordan

Dennis Doordan is an architectural and design historian on the faculty of the School of Architecture and co-editor of Design Issues, a journal devoted to the history, theory and criticism of design. The study of design is of potential interest to people interested in the Science, Technology and Values curriculum because the concept of design embraces more than an aesthetic practice limited to the styling of industrial objects. Design negotiates the intersection of technology and cultural values. In the modern era, design has been a powerful tool for shaping the development of technology and articulating the values of modern culture and modern designers have acted as both facilitators and critics of industrial technology. Doordan offers a course, History of Modern Design: Form Values and Technology which provides a historical perspective on the relationship between design, technology, and cultural values in the modern era.

Doordan's research interests include the history of twentieth century architecture, design theory, political themes in modern architecture & design, and contemporary exhibition design. He earned his M.A (1976) and Ph.D.(1983) in Architectural History from Columbia University and his B.A. (1973) in History from Stanford University. He joined the Notre Dame faculty in 1990.

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Christopher Hamlin

(Ph.D., Univ. of Wisconsin, 1982). Professor of History. History of technology and history of medicine. Books: What Becomes of Pollution? Adversary Science and the Controversy on the Self-Purification of Rivers in Britain, 1850-1900 (1987); A Science of Impurity: Water Analysis in Nineteenth-Century Britain (1990); (co-author) Deep Disagreement in U.S. Agriculture: Making Sense of Policy Conflict (1993); Public Health and Social Justice in the Age of Chadwick: Britain 1800-1854 (1998). Recent Articles: "Concepts of Predisposing Causes in the Early Nineteenth Century Public Health Movement" (1992); "Reflexivity in Technology Studies: Toward a Technology of Technology (and Science)?" (1992); "Between Knowledge and Action: Themes in the History of Environmental Chemistry" (1993); "Environmental Sensibility in Edinburgh, 1839-1840: the 'Fetid Irrigation' Controversy"(1994).

Email:  Christopher.S.Hamlin.1@nd.edu

Chris Hamlin's web page

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Don A. Howard

Don Howard, ph.D., Boston University, 1979. Professor of philosophy, philosophy of science, foundations of physics, history of philosophy of science. Books include: Einstein and the History of General Relativity, co-editor with John Stachel (1989), The Collected Papers of Albert Einstein, vol. 3, The Swiss Years: Writings, 1909-1912, contributing ed. with Martin Klein et al. (1993). Recent articles include: "Was Einstein Really a Realist?" (1993), "Einstein, Kant, and the Origins of Logcal Empiricism" (1994), "Relativity, Eindeutigkeit, and Monomorphism: Rudolph Carnap and the Development of the Category Concept in Formal Semantics" (1996), "A Peek Beyond the Veil of Maya: Einstein, Schopenhauer, and the Historical Background of the Conception of Space as a Ground for the Individualism of Physical Systems" (1997).

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Janet Kourany

Education:   Ph.D., Columbia

Areas of Interest:  Philosophy of Science, Gender and Science, Feminist Philosophy

Books: The Gender of Science (2002); Feminist Philosophies (1999, 1992); Philosophy in a Feminist Voice (1998); Scientific Knowledge (1998, 1987).

 Recent Articles: "A Philosophy of Science for the Twenty-First Century" (forthcoming); "Socially Responsible Directions for the Realism/Antirealism Controversy", Feminist Epistemology: Evidence and Test (2002); "A Successor to the Realism/Antirealism Question", Philosophy of Science (2000); "What Does Feminism Contribute to Philosophy of Science?" Controversies in Feminism (2000); "A New Program for Philosophy of Science, in Many Voices" Philosophy in a Feminist Voice (1998).

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Edward Manier

(Ph.D., St. Louis Univ., 1961). Professor of Philosophy. History and philosophy of biology and the neuromedical sciences, social studies of science. Books: The Young Darwin and His Cultural Circle (1978); (editor) Neurobiology and Narrative (forthcoming). Recent Articles: "Reductionist Rhetoric: Expository Strategies and the Development of the Molecular Neurobiology of Behavior" (1989); "Walker Percy: Language, Neuropsychology and Moral Tradition" (1991); "Conditions for the Possibility of Human Behavioral Genetics" (forthcoming).

Email:  A.E.Manier.1@nd.edu

Edward Manier's home page

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Vaughn McKim

(Ph.D., Yale, 1966). Associate Professor of Philosophy. Philosophy of social science, philosophy of technology, contemporary metaphysical issues in philosophy of science. Books: (coeditor and contributor) Causality in Crisis? Statistical Methods and the Search for Causal Knowledge in the Social Sciences (1997). Recent Articles: "Scientific Rationality: Construction or Constraint?" (1988); "Singular Causal Explanation in the Social Sciences" (forthcoming).

Email:  Vaughn.R.McKim.1@nd.edu

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  Michael Rae
Associate Professor of Philosophy

Areas of Interest:  Metaphysics, Epistemology, Philosophy of Religion

Books:

World Without Design: The Ontological Consequences of Naturalism (Oxford University Press, 2002); Material Constitution: A Reader (Rowman & Littlefield, 1997)

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William Ramsey

 (Ph.D., Univ. of California, San Diego, 1989). Associate Professor of Philosophy. Cognitive science and the philosophy of psychology. Books: (coeditor) Philosophy and Connectionist Theory (1991); (co-editor) Rethinking Intuition (forthcoming); Recent Articles: "Parallelism and Functionalism" (1989); "Connectionism and Three Levels of Nativism" (with Stephen Stich) (1990); "Connectionism, Eliminativism and the Future of Folk Psychology" (1990); "Where Does the Self-refutation Objection Take Us?" (1991); "Prototypes and Conceptual Analysis" (1992); "Connectionism and the Philosophy of Mental Representation" (1993); "Prototypes and Conceptual Analysis" (1994); "Investigating Common Sense Psychology" (1996); "Do Connectionist Representations Earn Their Explanatory Keep?" (forthcoming).

Email:  William.M.Ramsey.1@nd.edu

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Maura Ryan

PhD, Yale

Area of Specialization: MT

Maura A. Ryan is associate professor of Christian ethics, with particular interests in medical ethics and feminism.

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Kristin Shrader-Frechette

See Kristin Shrader-Frechette's home page

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Phillip R. Sloan

Phil Sloan  (Ph.D., Univ. of California, San Diego, 1970). Professor in the Program of Liberal Studies and Concurrent Professor of History. History of biology, 1700-1990, Buffon studies, history of natural history, evolution, recent human genetics. Books: (coeditor) From Natural History to the History of Nature: Readings fromBuffon and his Critics (1981); Introduction and editing of: Richard Owen's Hunterian Lectures at theRoyal College of Surgeons, May-June 1837 (1992).Editor and contributor, Controlling Our Destinies:Historical, Philosophical,Ethical, and Theological  Perspectives on the Human Genome Project (forthcoming,  University of Notre Dame Press, 1999);

Recent Articles and Chapters: "Organic Molecules Revisited" (1992); "The Gaze of Natural History"(1995); "Lamarck from an English-Language Perspective," (1997); "Lamarck in Britain: Transforming Lamarck's Transformism" (1997); "From Natural Law to Evolutionary Ethics in Enlightenment French Natural History" in: J. Maienschein and M. Ruse (eds), Biology and the Foundation of Ethics (Cambridge, 1999); "Darwin on Nature: Theology, Romanticism and Darwinian Theory," (forthcoming, 2001, Osiris), "Teleology and Form Revisited" (forthcoming); "Natural History" (forthcoming).

Email:  Phillip.R.Sloan.1@nd.edu.

Web page: http://www.nd.edu/~psloan

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Andrew Weigart
              
Professor of Sociology
Ph.D.: University of Minnesota, 1968

Professor Weigert's areas of interest include social psychology, religion, theory, environment, and modern identity. He has authored or co-authored over 50 scholarly pieces and eight books, the most recent being Self, Society, and Natural Environment. Current initiatives are in teaching about environment and modern identity. Weigert is the subject of a biographical entry in the "Encyclopedia of Religion and Society" and is listed in various "Who's Who." He received the 2002 College of Arts and Letters Sheedy Award for Undergraduate Teaching and two Kaneb undergraduate teaching awards (multiple recipients).

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Robert J. Wolosin

Bob Wolosin is an Adjunct Associate Professor who teaches the Cultural Aspects of Clinical Medicine course, STV 454. His former "regular" job was at the Family Practice Residency Program of Memorial Hospital, where he was Director of Behavioral Science. This position gave him an "insider's" view of the medical world, which he still uses to inform and enhance his teaching at Notre Dame.

Trained as a social psychologist at the University of Michigan, Bob's research interests are in the determinants of physicians' identities and in the application of social psychological principles to medical practice. Lately, he has become interested in Sports Psychology.

Bob is on the Board of Directors of La Casa de Amistad and the St. Joseph County Minority Health Coalition. He enjoys bicycling, hiking, and visits to his grandchildren in New Hampshire. Bob is an avid amateur potter.

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