The Kamat Group

Graduate Students

Doug Hines

Doug is from Mansfield, Ohio and received his Bachelors of Science in Chemistry from Baldwin-Wallace College in 2009. Doug is in his fifth year of work for his PhD in Physical Chemistry. His current research uses ultra-fast transient absorption spectroscopy to study the effect of various surface reactions on the recombination dynamics of quantum dots. The ultimate goal is to better understand quantum dot passivation effects and to use this knowledge to optimize photovoltaic construction.
Email: dhines3@nd.edu




Jeff Christians

Jeff is a fifth year doctoral student in the Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering Department at Notre Dame. He is originally from Grand Rapids, Michigan where he received his bachelor degree in Chemical Engineering from Calvin College in 2010 and performed research on using individual CdSe quantum dots as wide dynamic range fluorescent biosensors. Jeff's work in the Kamat lab has focused on improving Sb2S3 extremely thin absorber (ETA) solar cells by understanding the hole transfer mechanism in these devices. Currently, Jeff is exploring organo-metal lead halide perovskites for use in photovoltaics, studying alternative hole conductor materials and improving the understanding of these devices.
Email: jchrist5@nd.edu

Yong-Siou Chen

Yong-Siou received a M.S. in Chemical Engineering at National Taiwan University of Science and Technology in 2008. He is currently a fourth year graduate student in Chemistry and Biochemistry at the University of Notre Dame in Prof. Kamat's lab. His research interests include hematite as a catalyst for the water oxidation reaction.
Email: ychen16@nd.edu






Joseph Manser

Joseph received a B.S. in chemistry in 2011 from Catawba College in Salisbury, North Carolina, where he also played two years of varsity baseball. As a sophomore, he had the exciting opportunity to work as a visiting scientist at the FBI's Counterterrorism and Forensic Science Research Unit. He joined the Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering Department at the University of Notre Dame in the fall of 2011, and became a member of the Kamat research group a semester later. His research focuses on understanding the underlying material and device properties that govern the performance of next generation photovoltaics. Techniques such as femtosecond transient absorption spectroscopy allow for characterization of the ultrafast excited state properties of photoactive materials. The ultimate goal of this work is to make low-cost, high-efficiency solar cells a competitive renewable technology capable of meeting our current and future energy demands.
Email: jmanser@nd.edu

Jacob Hoffman

Jacob Hoffman received his Bachelors of Science in Chemistry and Mathematics from Heidelberg University in 2012. During undergrad he did research in the synthesis of Dafachronic acid derivatives and computational modeling of core/shell type quantum dots. He is currently pursuing his doctoral degree at the University of Notre Dame in the department of Chemistry and Biochemistry.
Email: jhoffm10@nd.edu





Danilo Jara

Danilo received his Bachelors in Chemistry at University of Santiago de Chile. During his undergrad thesis he did research on the synthesis and characterization of copper(I) complexes. He received the "Becas Chile" scholarship from the Chilean government to pursue a doctoral degree abroad. Because of his passion for energy research, he started as a graduate student in the department of Chemistry and Biochemistry at Notre Dame in 2012 as a member of Prof. Kamat's lab. He is interested in synthesising, characterising, and studying photophysical properties of nanomateriales for light energy convertion applications such as multinary-quantum dots solar cells. In his free time, Danilo enjoys soccer, table tennis, gardening, and spending time with his wife, Dania.
Email: djaraqui@nd.edu

Seogjoon Yoon

Seogjoon Yoon (Seog Joon Yoon) graduated Cum Laude from Hanyang University, South Korea with his BS in 2010, and received MS from the same university in 2012. During undergraduate and masters studies, he performed research on dye-sensitized solar cells and the electrochemical oxidation of titanium. He is currently pursuing his Ph.D at the University of Notre Dame under the supervision of Professors Libai Huang and Prashant Kamat. His primary research interest is in the interfacial carrier transport between inorganic structures.
Email: syoon2@nd.edu



Victoria Bridewell

Victoria is a second year doctoral student in the department of Chemistry and Biochemistry at Notre Dame. She graduated summa cum laude from the University of Memphis in 2013 receiving Bachelor's degrees in Chemistry and Applied Mathematics. During the academic session, she was a member of the Mobile Analytical Monitoring and Miniaturization Lab on campus developing instrumentation for the online monitoring and modeling of formation kinetics of water disinfection byproducts. Off campus, she held an internship with DuPont Titanium Technologies accumulating over two years of industrial research experience implementing process technology and developing new and improving old products. Her research interests at Notre Dame focus on the development of "sense and shoot" semiconductor-metal cluster assemblies for use in chemical sensing. In her spare time, Victoria enjoys working out, going to ND sporting events, and playing with her Siberian Husky, Tyris.
Email: victoria.bridewell.1@nd.edu


Steven Kobosko

Steven is a second year doctoral student in Chemical Engineering at the University of Notre Dame. He graduated from the University of Central Florida in 2012 with a bachelor's degree in Electrical Engineering. He then spent a year on a Fulbright Scholarship at the Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne in Switzerland. There he worked in the Laboratory of Photonics and Interfaces under Prof. Michael Grätzel researching Fe2O3 (hematite) water splitting. Steven enjoys soccer, tennis, hiking, and playing piano in his free time.
Email: skobosko@nd.edu