"Welcome to The Prashant Kamat lab at the University of Notre Dame! With the help of internal and external collaborations we have established a successful multidisciplinary research program in nanostructure architectures and energy conversion processes." - Prashant Kamat


Kamat Lab News


Wednesday, August 20, 2014Posted by Jeff Christians

Editorail: Reporting on Heterogeneous Photocatalysis

This editorial written for ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces looks into the best practices for reporting on hetergeneous photocatalysis. It includes tips for making measurements as well as proper reporting of values and things to watch out for in the literature.

Best Practices for Reporting on Heterogeneous Photocatalysis

Heterogeneous photocatalysis is of broad interest in materials chemistry and materials science, particularly with the rapid growth of research attention being directed toward energy-related applications, pollution mitigation, and other related areas of environmental impact.(1) A literature survey reveals more than 9000 papers with the word photocatalyst or photocatalysis in the title published during the last ten years (Source: Web of Science, July 3, 2014), with the number of papers published each year increasing significantly since 2005. The materials and physical chemistry journals of the American Chemical Society receive a significant number of papers in the area of photocatalysis.

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Wednesday, August 20, 2014Posted by Jeff Christians

Catalytic Reduction of CO2 with TiO2

Read the latest paper from the Kamat Lab!

The Origin of Catalytic Effect in the Reduction of CO2 at Nanostructured TiO2 Films

The Origin of Catalytic Effect in the Reduction of CO2 at Nanostructured TiO2 Films

Abstract: Electrocatalytic activity of mesoscopic TiO2 films towards the reduction of CO2 is probed by depositing a nanostructured film on a glassy carbon electrode. The one-electron reduction of CO2 in acetonitrile seen at an onset potential of -1.1 V (vs. NHE) is ~0.5 V lower than the one observed with a glassy carbon electrode. The electrocatalytic role of TiO2 is elucidated through spectroelectrochemistry and product analysis. Ti3+ species formed when TiO2 film is subjected to negative potentials have been identified as active reduction sites. Binding of CO2 to catalytically active Ti3+ followed by the electron transfer facilitates the initial one-electron reduction process. Methanol was the primary product when the reduction was carried out in wet acetonitrile.

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Wednesday, August 13, 2014Posted by Jeff Christians

PhysOrg: Band Filling in Perovskite

Band filling with free charge carriers in organometal halide perovskites

PhysOrg: A new paper by University of Notre Dame researchers describes their investigations of the fundamental optical properties of a new class of semiconducting materials known as organic-inorganic "hybrid" perovskites.

The research was conducted at the Notre Dame Radiation Laboratory by Joseph Manser, a doctoral student in chemical and biomolecular engineering, under the direction of Prashant Kamat, Rev. John A. Zahm Professor of Science. The findings appear in a paper in the August 10 edition of the journal Nature Photonics.

Article continued on PhysOrg

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Wednesday, August 13, 2014Posted by Jeff Christians

C&EN: Graphene Surprises By Decomposing

Graphene surprises by decomposing

C&EN: Graphene's hallmark chemical stability has made this ultrathin carbon network an ideal support material in catalysis and energy studies. But that inertness is now being called into question by an investigation showing that the material can decompose when used in common applications (Chem. Mater. 2014, DOI: 10.1021/cm5026552).

Water-dispersible forms of graphene are easy to make and easy to handle via simple wet-chemistry methods. Large numbers of researchers use the materials to support nanoparticle catalysts for use in environmental remediation, solar cells, and fuel cells.

Article continued on C&EN

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Monday, August 11, 2014Posted by Jeff Christians

Band Filling in Perovskite

Read the latest paper from the Kamat Lab!

Band Filling with Free Charge Carriers in Organometal Halide Perovskites

Band filling with free charge carriers in organometal halide perovskites

Abstract: The unique and promising properties of semiconducting organometal halide perovskites have brought these materials to the forefront of solar energy research. Here, we present new insights into the excited-state properties of CH3>NH3PbI3 thin films through femtosecond transient absorption spectroscopy measurements. The photoinduced bleach recovery at 760 nm reveals that band-edge recombination follows second-order kinetics, indicating that the dominant relaxation pathway is via recombination of free electrons and holes. Additionally, charge accumulation in the perovskite films leads to an increase in the intrinsic bandgap that follows the Burstein–Moss band filling model. Both the recombination mechanism and the band-edge shift are studied as a function of the photogenerated carrier density and serve to elucidate the behaviour of charge carriers in hybrid perovskites. These results offer insights into the intrinsic photophysics of semiconducting organometal halide perovskites with direct implications for photovoltaic and optoelectronic applications.

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